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  1. Yesterday
  2. GusMac

    1/72 HMS Vanguard 1787

    Looking forward to seeing how these build up. I'm sure it will be mighty impressive when done. I wouldn't have the cojones to fork out so much for a kit that I'd likely end up turning into the world's most expensive matchwood!
  3. DocRob

    1/72 HMS Vanguard 1787

    Thanks for that great review James. That is quite something different and I like it a lot. Since I read all the Hornblower stories in my youth I wanted to build a wooden ship. preferably a frigate. Years ago I started with the build of a French cutter of the legendary Corsair Surcouf of St. Malo. The kit is made by Artesanialatina and is double planked and fully equiped with Details. What stopped me from desiring a frigate was the scale like the Vanguard with 1/72. The Cutter is 1/50 and I find it easier to detail in that scale and it spares you the redundancy of Building 74 cannons with gates and other repetetive works. After finishing the Renard, I will go for the big thing and search for a big scale ship (that's what we are here for) with loads of detail, I hope to find a decent kit of a Corvette or a Sloop in 1/32 or similar. Our member Spliffsecond planted a brainbug recently, by showing his rubber powered wooden SE.5A. I remembered liking to work with Wood and metal and decided to continue the build of the Cutter in near future and maybe a wooden plane in between. So thanks again for feeding the bug with that review of a piece of art kit. Cheers Rob
  4. 1:35 Russian T-80UD MBT Trumpeter Catalogue # 09527 The T-80 is a third-generation main battle tank (MBT) designed and manufactured in the Soviet Union. When it entered service in 1976, it was the first MBT in the world to feature a powerful multifuel turbine engine as its main propulsion engine. The T-80U was last produced in a factory in Omsk, Russia, while the T-80UD and further-developed T-84 continue to be produced in Ukraine. The T-80 is similar in layout to the T-64; the driver's compartment is on the centre line at the front, the two-man turret is in the centre with gunner on the left and commander on the right, and the engine is rear mounted. The original T-80 design uses a 1,000hp gas turbine instead of a 750-horsepower diesel engine, although some later variants of the T-80 revert to diesel engine usage. The gearbox is different, with five forward and one reverse gear, instead of seven forward and one reverse. Suspension reverts from pneumatic to torsion bar, with six forged steel-aluminium rubber-tired road wheels on each side, with the tracks driven by rear sprockets. The glacis is of laminate armour and the turret is armoured steel. The turret houses the same 125 mm 2A46 smoothbore gun as the T-72, which can fire anti-tank guided missiles as well as regular ordnance. A disadvantage highlighted during combat in Chechnya was the vulnerability of the T-80BV to catastrophic explosion. The reason given by US and Russian experts is the vulnerability of stored semi-combustible propellant charges and missiles when contacted by the molten metal jet from the penetration of a HEAT warhead, causing the entire ammunition load to explode. In parallel with the T-80U and Russia in general, the Morozov Bureau in Ukraine developed a diesel-powered version, the T-80UD. It is powered by the 1,000-hp 6TD-1 6-cylinder multi-fuel two-stroke turbo-piston diesel engine, ensuring high fuel efficiency and a long cruising range. The T-80UD shares most of the T-80U's improvements but can be distinguished from it by a different engine deck and distinctive smoke-mortar array and turret stowage boxes. It retains the remotely-controlled commander's machine gun. About 500 T-80UD tanks were built in the Malyshev plant between 1987 and 1991. Extract from Wikipedia The kit This is certainly a large (48cm x 30cm x 8cm), reasonably weighty and full box of styrene, and Trumpeter say this kit has approx. 940 parts, so it’s no weekend project either. The box art depicts a T-80 on some sort of drive-past/parade on Red Square in Moscow and shows the lines of this vehicle off to a real advantage. Including this 2017 release, Trumpeter’s T-80 has seen around 9 incarnations (including the T-84), up to press, with this of course being the T-80UD, in Russian service. Inside the box, we have a total of 21 sprues, with most of these in light grey plastic, four in brown, and three in an off-white vinyl which can be cemented with your regular brand. These are packaged individually, mostly, except for the multiples of the same sprue. In the middle of the box, another separate box with a product lid, contains the lower hull, turret, rear engine deck, some of those smaller sprues, decals, braided copper wire, and PE fret. In all, a very busy and attractive kit. It's generally accepted that the base T-80 is a pretty accurate depiction of this Soviet beast, so I won’t be looking at any elements of accuracy here, plus I’m not qualified to comment on them either. Construction of this kit is broken down into 32 stages over 20 pages, and begins with assembly of the idler, drive and road wheels, spread out over the first six sprues. We then plough onto what I think is the most impressive part of this kit, and that is the slide-moulded lower hull. Typically designed as a bathtub part, the details are just amazing, including the lower forward glacis, torsion bar fairings, access panels etc. Tensioner wheel mounts are also integral, and the various weld seams look excellent. Road wheel holes are also keyed to accept the swing arms and ensure they angle properly. Some rather nifty PE clasps also store what looks to be a section of a log, perhaps for vehicle recovery if bogged down. The log itself is moulded on a flexible vinyl sprue. The lower hull is massively detailed with a deployable plate that may be something to do with RPG defence or similar. I’m not too sure. In front of this will fit four sections of flexible, cementable vinyl that seem to form a skirt. It’s definitely a nice touch. Trumpeter has moulded the upper hull as two main parts with separate reactive armour panel for the forward glacis and a rather nice slide-moulded engine vent for the rear. The latter is bagged separately within the interior box of the kit and needs almost zero clean-up before use. PE engine screen grilles are supplied for this model, as seems to be standard these days. Many of the included parts make up the tracks. These are made up entirely out of individual links, and on top of that, you’ll need to fit the horn to each one. Each side has 82 links, and a jig is included to help you assemble these. They do appear to be workable, or at least to some degree so you can assemble the whole length and then apply to the tank. These parts are moulded in brown styrene, for reasons unknown. I’m rather impressed with the kit fenders. As with many areas of this kit (turret, tow cable ends etc.), slide moulding has been employed to create a truly 3D part without the need for awkward construction, especially on the forward end of the fenders where many curves are present. More slide-moulding excellence with the turret. This complex shape has a realistic cast effect, and a separate lower mounting plate. There isn’t any internal detail here, but you can of course pose the gunner/commander hatches in the open position. You’d be better off filling the void with a crew member though. The reactive armour bricks fit separately to the turret. In fact, when you attach all of the various bricks and stowage, very little of that texture seems to be seen! A three-part barrel is included and for this specific kit, a flexible vinyl mantlet is to be used. A single decal sheet is included with simple, white printing. This appears to be nice and thin and with minimal carrier film. Three schemes are included with this release, and they are unidentified on the colour sheet that’s included. Paint references are supplied for Mr Hobby, Vallejo, Model Master, Tamiya and Humbrol colours. Trumpeter’s instructions are nice and simple to follow, even with a model with almost 1000 parts. Illustrations are in simple line drawing format and everything is clearly annotated where necessary. Conclusion An impressive kit in many ways, including overall detail, complexity of slide-moulded parts, stature and overall presence. I quite like Russian armour, just from its appearance in comparison to regular Western subjects, and this kit ticks all the right boxes. My sincere thanks to Pocketbond for sending this kit for us to review. To purchase, check out your favourite Trumpeter retailer.
  5. WattsNZ

    Trumpeter 1/32 A1-J Skyraider

    Hi there, yep in that image you are correct. I have seen other images where the covers are grey or absent completely
  6. Sgt Shultz II

    Trumpeter 1/32 A1-J Skyraider

    I have a question. On the bottom picture the inner wing seems to be covered so the gun does not show. Is that correct?? And it's painted black...
  7. Last week
  8. James H

    1/72 HMS Vanguard 1787

    1/72 HMS Vanguard 1787 Victory Models/Amati Catalogue # 1300/04 HMS Vanguard was a 74-gun, third-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 6 March 1787 at Deptford. She was the sixth vessel to bear the name. Vanguard was built as an Arrogant Class vessel. Arrogant-class ships of the line were a class of twelve 74-gun third rate ships designed by Sir Thomas Slade for the Royal Navy and were designed as a development of Slade's previous Bellona class, sharing the same basic dimensions. During this period, the original armament was the same across all the ships of the common class, of which the Arrogant-class ships were members. The first of the twelve ships of this class were HMS Arrogant and HMS Cornwall, both completed in April and September of 1761, respectively. The kit I apologise if we seem a little late to the show with this release, with the kit originally being release around 2007, give or take a year or three.. However, unlike the world of plastic modelling that I usually frequent, these sorts of kits are pretty timeless and stand the test of time far, far better. It’s also a pretty premium product and it really does make sense to be able to see a full review of it before you shell out not an insignificant amount of money on it. There are numerous builds of this online, with a good number on Model Ship World, but there are no actual reviews that I can see anywhere, so I thought I’d try to redress that here. If you order this kit, you really need to make sure that you have bench space for it. Sounds obvious, but this is a very large box and weighs in the region of 14-15kg (30lbs+). Thankfully, the box is also of a pretty rigid construction to hold all the weight contained therein. Amati/Victory Models’ presentation is flawless with a port side profile of the completed ship on the lid, adjacent to a bow and stern image of the same model. Text says that the model can be finished as either Vanguard, Bellerophon, or Elephant. More colour images adorn the sides, plus some small captures of some of the plans. Lifting the lid off shows that this is merely a decorative lid and the actual corrugated box has a built-in lid that’s locked into place with three large tabs. At least if you sit another kit or two on this one whilst in stash, it shouldn’t crumple under the weight. Inside the box we have all of the strip and dowel timber that is bundled together and bound with small lengths of elastic string, three large boxes of components, one smaller box of components, several packs of various flat timbers with laser-cut parts, king-size instruction manual, and a whopping 20-plan pack with a heavy gauge photo-etch fret of embellishments for the stern quarters etc. The first and smallest of the boxes I come to contains some thick rope for the anchors, a bag of grating pieces, a sheet of what appears to be thick tin foil, and a large bag of cast metal gun carriages that have an antique finish to them. I find the inclusion of the latter quite a puzzle as kits of this standard would normally have these parts given in timer, which would be my preference. Detail on the carriages is actually quite nice, but they also have staggered sides, and I’m not 100% sure how accurate these would be. I think I’ll replace these when my build begins. Onto the next box. I know it’s not the done thing, as we say, to add sails to this sort of model, although many do and make a superb job. If you do wish to go down that avenue, then a large piece of sail cloth is included for you, as are two sheets of plans which pertain to adding these. We have two laser-cut pieces of timber in this box, notably with parts for the masts and bitts. I’m sure all will become clearer when it comes time to build this. Of course, there are no parts numbers on any wooden components, and you will need to refer to the five sheets of plans that identify what these elements are numbered as so you may locate them to the construction sequence. ELEVEN sheets of brass photo-etch parts are included too, with everything apart from the stern decoration and quarter details. Notice that the launch oars are provided as photo-etch too, but you may want to replace the oar bodies with something less flat in appearance, such as dowel. Two sheets have the ships name included, as well as other décor, and the ships stove that will be mostly hidden below deck. These sheets also include the stern and quarter windows, lanterns etc. Many hundreds of parts are included here, such as the cannon port hinges, hammock frames, channel brackets, chain plates, boom irons et al. If that’s not enough metal for you in this box, then add to that the two packets of copper hull plates that are presented as sheets. These can easily be gently scored and snapped off before fitting. These contain the nail fastening details too. I believe there are around 2500 plates which are needed, and you should, in theory, have some to spare too. Two patterns are included, for port and starboard sides. You’ll need to consult with the plans to determine which is which. A sheet of black paper is also included. At the moment, I’m unsure as to what this is, but I’m thinking it could be something to do with the interior of the rear officer’s quarters. A sheet of acetate is included for the stern windows too. Our second large box of fittings contains two trays of components. One tray contains some wooden components, deadeyes and rigging blocks, plus some small anchors and carronades. I believe the latter may be for use if you choose to build HMS Elephant as some weaponry was slightly different to Vanguard and Bellerophon. The next tray is given over exclusively to the many rigging cord spools you’ll need, in various sizes and in two colours. Some rope is also supplied. Onto the last box of components. The first tray of parts are all cast white metal, including the figureheads for all three versions of this model, plus some trim, main anchors and the stern decoration for Vanguard, cast in three pieces. Now, whilst Bellerophon is in white metal, Vanguard and Elephant are cast in grey resin and they look spectacular! I believe that initial kits had all of these in white metal but coaxing the parts to fit the curvature of the stern proved tricky, so resin was substituted. Strange that this wasn’t included for all three options though. My original intent was to build Bellerophon, but I think this will now be Elephant because firstly, I haven’t seen one yet done, and secondly, because I can use a resin stern décor and add some amazing colouration to it. Two stern fascias are supplied in this kit, with Vanguard being shallower than that of Elephant and Bellerophon, so as to accommodate the carvings. The last tray contains PE parts, more rigging cord, brass nails, brass wire, cannon and gun carriages, cannon shot, and a number of other metal castings. All metal castings here are antique in finish. Being a large kit means you need plenty of strip wood stock, especially as this is a double-planked model. First planking timber is lest numerous that second because of the upper bulwarks being supplied as plywood parts. Timber quality is excellent with no stringy or split wood. Bundles are kept together with elastic string. I used a little extra tape on some of the thinner stock, to stop them bulging out in the middle. Various diameters of down are included and of different hues. As these will generally be painted, I think the colour is inconsequential. Again, quality is superb, with no splitting or roughness. All of the various packages of flat sheet components are stored in thick plastic sleeves, and the first here contains three sheets. One of these is for the various keel parts, plus the rudder. Another of the same material is included with various rigging bitts and anchor stock parts etc. A ply sheet is also included with the strips to mount the false cannon on the lower deck and parts for the stern quarters. Moving onto the next packet, we are presented with a laser-cut sheet of MDF for the ship’s launches. Here we have the keels and bulkheads for these vessels, all cleanly cut and with minimal effort needed to remove. I’m a little surprised to see this material for this purpose, but the homogenous nature of it is perhaps better suited than plywood and should provide an excellent basis for these miniature builds. More sheets of thin ply provide the main deck components, stern fascias (two options), bow gratings, upper bulwarks with cannon openings, and formers for the quarter galleries. Moving onto heavy material, several sheets of MDF provide all of the ship’s bulkheads, false keel (broken down into two parts) etc. Another sheet of timber contains laser-cut channels, carved mouldings etc. Some of these would benefit from a little carving in themselves to profile them a little better. Flags? You definitely need them for a ship like this. A set of silk-screen printed flags is included and these appear to have a self-adhesive backing. Lastly, for parts, we have a relatively thick-gauge photo-etch sheet what holds all the parts for the stern and quarter decorations, including railings, arches and other ornamentation. Under a coat of primer and paint, these look very good in place, as seen on numerous building logs on Model Ship World. When it comes to paperwork, this kit won’t leave you wanting. Inside the box, as well as a large assembly manual, is that pack of 20 plans. Most of these are A1 in size with one plan being a whopping A0, so make sure you have some wall space to mount it to for reference. Out of these plans, 5 provide parts maps and identification for the materials supplied, 2 plans deal with the optional sails, at least three deal with rigging Vanguard, 3 concern masting, and the rest for the hull and details etc. Two building instruction books are supplied. The first one deals with the main areas of construction using line drawings and text. This is quite a large book and has 32 pages. Accompanying this is a smaller A4 book of 20 pages which is generally text-driven and deals with construction in more detail, plus finishing etc. Some very nice history of Vanguard, Bellerophon and Elephant is included. Conclusion It must be 10 to 12 years since this kit first hit the shelves, and here we are a decade or more on, and I finally get to take a glimpse at Chris Watton’s masterpiece. I remember him designing this at the time and saw a few online photos, and I have to say that the contents of this kit are pretty much what I expected, save for the inclusion of the cast gun carriages. I really like the inclusion of MDF for the main structure (bulkheads, horizontal former and false keel) as this has almost zero tendency to warp. Indeed, mine are die-straight and will form the basis of an accurate and trouble-free build. All timber stock is first rate (for this third-rate ship!), and fixtures and fittings are high quality. Having the upper bulwarks as pre-cut parts with their jigsaw fit and pre-cut cannon port is also a time saver and a big help in ensuring that all guns will mount in their correct place and the correct height/elevation. A comprehensive plan pack ensures that every constructional angle is covered, and with 20 plans, Amati haven’t cut any corners. This isn’t a beginner’s model, and I’m sure you’ve heard that phrase many times before, but in this case, you really must have a number of builds under your belt and be able to exercise a degree of project management and prerequisite modelling skills to cater to and overcome the challenges that a complex model like this will demand. In all, a super kit of a formidable class of ship and with all the bells and whistles to build any of three vessels. You can’t do better than that! My sincere thanks to Amati for sending this kit for reviewing on Large Scale Modeller. To purchase directly, check out your local Amati model stockist or online Amati retailer.
  9. Real pity Airfix seem to have ditched theirs. I quite like some of Trumpy's kits but the standard is almost laughably variable and this does seem to be a Friday afternoon job. Hadn't realised either quite what death-traps these were - that's a pretty horrible loss rate!
  10. 1/48 de Havilland DH.110 Sea Vixen FAW.2 Trumpeter Catalogue # 05808 The de Havilland DH.110 Sea Vixen is a British twin-engine, twin boom-tailed, two-seat jet fighter flown by the Royal Navy's Fleet Air Arm during the 1950s through the early 1970s. The Sea Vixen was designed by the de Havilland Aircraft Company during the late 1940s at its aircraft factory in Hatfield, Hertfordshire. It was developed from an earlier first-generation jet fighter, and the Sea Vixen was a carrier-based fleet air-defence fighter that served into the 1970s. Initially produced by de Havilland, it was later called the Hawker Siddeley Sea Vixen after the de Havilland Company was absorbed by the Hawker Siddeley Corporation in the year 1960. The Sea Vixen had the distinction of being the first British two-seat combat aircraft to achieve supersonic speed, albeit not in level flight. Operating from British aircraft carriers, it was used in combat over Tanganyika and over Yemen during the Aden Emergency. In 1972, the Sea Vixen was phased out in favour of the American-made McDonnell Douglas Phantom FG.1 interceptor. Only one Sea Vixen remains airworthy today in the world and is displayed regularly at air shows. The Sea Vixen also flew in an aerobatic role, performing in two Royal Navy display teams: Simon's Sircus and Fred's Five. Of the 145 Sea Vixens constructed, 55 were lost in accidents. Two DH.110 development prototypes were also lost. The 55 Sea Vixens lost represented a loss rate of almost 38%. 30 (54%) of these were fatal incidents, 21 of which involved the death of both pilot and observer. A small number of Sea Vixens were sent to FR Aviation at Tarrant Rushton airfield for conversion to D.3 drone standard, with some undergoing testing at RAF Llanbedr before the drone programme was abandoned. Among them was XP924, now G-CVIX, the only Sea Vixen to remain in flying condition, which has now been returned to 899 NAS colours. Formerly owned and operated by De Havilland Aviation, G-CVIX could be viewed at their hangar at Bournemouth Airport in Dorset, southern England, or at air shows around the UK. Extract courtesy of Wikipedia The kit I really can’t understand Airfix. All I can presume is that sales of their rather nice Sea Vixen didn’t merit it continuing in production, or it could simply be that it wasn’t scheduled into their production schedules with their current batch of new releases. Either way, until Trumpeter released this particular kit, you would really need to scrabble around to try to source the Airfix release, and probably get scalped in the process. But, thankfully, Trumpeter comes to the rescue with a brand-new tooling of this aircraft, and in the same version as the hard-to-find Airfix kit. All is good, yes? Well, maybe… Whilst my review looks at the kit from an in-box perspective, it is pretty apparent from eyeballing the kit and also gleaning information from online sources, that Trumpeter’s B-Team have been busy once again and got dirty in the process. I’ll mention the differences and possible discrepancies with the shapes as I look at the sprues. Each sprue us individually bagged, and a number of components are placed in a separate compartment within the box. These are the nosecone and intakes, clear parts (also wrapped in foam), and a PE fret. Fuselage upper half Off to a reasonably good start here with this superbly moulded upper panel that spans the area up to where the wings would fold. This is neatly keyed to accept the tabs on the tail boom halves, and also exhibits some very nice panel line details. The only rivets are those that follow the panel lines. If anything, both panel line and rivet detail is perhaps a little too heavy, but this can easily be lessened with a coat of Mr Surfacer and rubbed down before prime/paint. Internally, some stiffening webs are moulded to lessen the compression effect that could arise during handling and construction. A small number of nubs exist on the upper surface, from the moulding process, and these will be very simple to eliminate. These are where the moulding sprue will have been before they removed it. With my reference, a number of panel shapes look wrong too and Trump has simply used the rivet depiction to replace the various shapes and style of fasteners that exist here. Fuselage lower half Following in the same style as the upper panel, this lower part, incorporating the lower nose and gear bay openings, has the same style of surface textures which I think need reducing a little. Openings are moulded to accept the separate wheel bay installations, and a large airbrake section is included with all internal details. Here, and on the wing surface, you will need to remove those very minimal nubs. As for the airbrake housing detail, I would say this is pretty reasonable, complete with the various structures and pressure tanks. Sprue B Here we have the external halves for the the tail booms. Here is where we see some discrepancies from both the Airfix release (which is generally taken to be pretty accurate as far as shapes go), and also from reference I have. It does appear that the booms are slightly too long aft of the wing trailing edge, but more frustratingly, the top of the fin appears to be more bulbous than it should be. I do think this can be fixed with a little sawing and putty though, but nonetheless, Trump got this wrong. The booms seem to be almost devoid of any panel line details too. Whereas Airfix moulded their stabiliser with a separate elevator, this kit is provided with the parts combined. I have to say that it makes the Trump effort look like the whole stab and elevator is a single unit with no real differentiation in the areas. A few swiped of a scriber to deepen the panel line that separates them would be needed. Other parts here include the two-part nose wheel with integral hubs (no weighted effect), cockpit bulkhead and upper halves of the intake channels. Sprue C This sprue contains the inboard halves for the tail booms, plus the upper stabiliser section, nose wheel fork half, and intake lower halves. Trumpeter has moulded a great little instrument panel for the pilot, with blank, recessed gauges that can be supplemented by the kit decals (or better, Airascale instrument decals). Something else which looks a little anomalous, perhaps, is the navigator hatch. Compared with the Airfix kit, and with my own and online searches, the hatch appears to be narrower than it should be, and perhaps a tad longer too. The part itself is nicely detailed with rivets running around its circumference. The lower portions of the main gear struts are moulded here too, and these look rather good. Sprue D Both wings have their outboard panels moulded here, as traditional upper and lower halves. Ailerons are separate, as are the wing fences which are supplied as photo-etch parts. Again, the only rivet details to be seen are those outlining the various panel lines. Even the panel lines on these parts aren’t too numerous and looks pretty good. You will also find the cockpit tub here, and whilst similar in many respects to the Airfix kit, the consoles themselves look more simplified and even a different shape. The starboard pilot console appears to be narrower than it should be, so some work will be required here to fix that. Maybe Eduard will come up with something that should at least improve these rather lacking areas. Crew seats are also very disappointing in their amazingly basic details. Again, maybe look for something aftermarket to replace these entirely. I have to say that I much prefer how Trumpeter has created the wheel bays on this model, in comparison to Airfix’s release. On the latter, these are all-in-one mouldings, but this kit has separate side ceilings with more detail, and also detailed side walls. A much nicer representation indeed. As for the speed brake itself, this is very similar to the Airfix kit, and indeed very close to the real thing. Sprue E The key player here is the upper nose section of the Sea Vixen, with both cockpit openings. This is a very nicely executed moulding with some slide-mould tech used to create it. That heavy fairing to the front of the windscreen is beautifully recreated, but you will also note the navigator’s opening which does appear to be too narrow and long. You may notice something else that’s really frustrating too, and that’s the solid rear portion of the pilot’s canopy is moulded here too meaning you CAN’T position the hood in an open position. Just what was Trumpeter thinking about here? For many, that will be a deal-breaker. More slide moulding is employed for the tail pipes, and this part includes a portion of the exhaust tube on the interior. The edges of the external tube are nice and thin and sit recessed within the rear fuselage portion. Very nicely recreated. Parts are included for what appears to be the wing rib detail for a wing-fold build, but these aren’t shown in the kit instructions. Other parts here include the upper portion of the main gear wells, main gear exterior door parts (these have separate interior parts as seen on Sprue F), nose gear strut and ailerons that are constructed from upper and lower halves. The trailing edges of these look reasonably thin too. Sprue F In this day and age, I really would like to see companies create weighted effect tires. As well as this omission, the hubs are also very simplified and missing many key details. I sense the need for more aftermarket. The main gear interior door parts are found here, and these look excellent. Main gear well and nose gear well components can be found on this sprue, as can the intake fan parts and weapons pylons. A number of other cockpit parts are included, such as rudder pedals and navigators panel. Sprue G This is the weapons and stores sprue with provision to build two external fuel tanks, and four missiles. Missiles have clear nose parts included, and overall detail is very good. It’s a strange sprue to find the exhaust flame holders, but here they are! Sprue H Trumpeter’s clear parts are always superb and come wrapped in an extra sleeve of foam to protect them further. Frame lines are nicely defined, and the parts are bright, with excellent clarity. As you can see from this photo, the main hood isn’t designed to be posed open, as previously mentioned, and that is, for me, probably the killer blow amongst the various other issues. Separate parts Three parts are included in a separate bag. These are the nose cone and the single-piece intake fairings. More slide-moulding has been used here and the parts look very good. Only minimal clean-up is required to remove the sprue tabs. A sanding sponge will also be needed to remove he slightly fuzzy edges on the intake itself. Photo Etch A single fret includes parts for the wing gates, airbrake housing bay bulkheads and intake vanes. Production is excellent with small tags holding the parts in situ. Decals A single sheet of nicely printed decals is included. Printing is glossy, suitably thin and with minimal carrier film. Registration also appears to be correct. Instrument decals are included, but alas, no stencils. The three schemes are: FAW-2. Unit: 766 NAS, FAA. Serial 707/VL (XN647), RNAS Yeovilton, 1969 FAW-2. Unit: 890 NAS, FAA. Serial 127/E (XJ565) FAW-1. Unit: 893 NAS, FAA. Serial 464/C (XN654), HMS Centaur, 1964 Instructions I’ve always liked Trumpeter’s instructions. They are clear, non-ambiguous or fussy, and usually logical in approach. Construction is broken down into 35 stages in a manual that spans 18 pages. Come colour reference is supplied during the build. A colour sheet is included, highlighting the three schemes, with good scheme depiction and paint call-outs, plus decal placement. Other paint codes are supplied for Vallejo, Model Master, Tamiya and Humbrol. I could be wrong here, but the instructions show the undersides as being in silver (specifically Gunze N8), but I am sure these aircraft were white underneath. That could be a problem as the supplied underside codes are also printed in white, so you would need to get a set of more accurate markings that were correctly provided in black. Conclusion Another mixed bag from the house of Trumpeter. I can’t understand why they get things so wrong. There’s plenty of information out there to use as reference. We have shape and size issues with various elements of the airframe, and that lack of option for posing the cockpit in an open position. You’re going to need new cockpit elements, plus seats, wheels etc. to bring this anywhere close to the correct level of detail you’ll require. Then there’s filling the panel lines that are wrong and re-scribing them. You will need new serial decals too. Add to that the tail boom and fin issues, and your work will be cut out. In the meantime, we can all just pray that Airfix re-release their infinitely better kit, and this one can be castigated to the bin of curios and oddities. My sincere thanks to Pocketbond for sending out this sample for review here on LSM. To purchase, check your favourite online retailer or Trumpeter specialist.
  11. Pardelhas

    1:48 Fairey Firefly Mk.1

    True. A Firefly and a Fulmar in 1:32 are very needed!!!
  12. Pardelhas

    Takom Sd.Kfz.171 Panther Ausf. A Early

    a very good start!! Please keep them coming!
  13. My god the wing tip tanks are bad. Is there any resin one
  14. daz greenwood

    Takom Sd.Kfz.171 Panther Ausf. A Early

    A bit more done on the Panther Ausf.A. This is a week's work of progress on the build. DSC_3392_11756 by Darren Greenwood, on Flickr DSC_3393_11757 by Darren Greenwood, on Flickr
  15. I'm kind of the same way, Nick. The 335 was at least produced in small numbers and actually flew so I'll fudge a little to do this one!
  16. HKM just released the decal options:
  17. mikester

    Soo.... What did you just get???

    Another of these guys. That's six Dragon 110's in the stash, I'm done! (maybe)
  18. i have always sworn to never do a what if, whether it be Panzerwaffe 46 or Luftwaffe 46 but this may make me break that oath!
  19. nmayhew

    1:48 Fairey Firefly Mk.1

    i am not surprised there is no 1/32 kit of this (or the Fulmar) but there is something quite quirky i like about both these aircraft
  20. GusMac

    Scratching A Frog Prince

    You don't settle for an easy life Rich! Looking forward to this.
  21. Hey Everyone, I thought I would start this WIP with a little back info. I came to the decision about this scratch project when I was working on the Maz build about a year ago or so. I tend to work quite a ways ahead of myself. I have spent that time now, gathering everything I need for this build and I'm almost ready to give this a timid start. I say timid because this will be my secondary build for a bit while I finish my DIO. build for another site, so not as much time devoted to this project just now, but slow and steady to start. MAZ 543/Scud B I have very good references for scratching this large Russian launcher. There seems to be a number of good kits available on this subject. I really like all the body panels on this beast. I thought I could stretch myself a bit with these body panels and I like the overall big feel of this. You know me, big Russian trucks with many tires. However after getting most of the materials together to the point that I have everything for this build, and really started looking at what I had for a scratch project, and I realized that underneath the body work is the same Straight Rail Ladder Frame with the same Suspension and Drive System that I just built in the MAZ project. I didn't want to build another Maz. This will be a great project later on, but I want to build something not a MAZ. M25 DRAGON WAGON My second choice to scratch was the huge American M25 Dragon Wagon. I like this monster large tractor very much, with so many possibilities to work with. And for me, the single thing that really makes me want to attempt this project is the idea of scratching a Quad Chain Double Axle !! Oh! the chains of bondage and torture we model builders put ourselves through. I was a bit worked up to start this project when everything stalled. I need to find clearer, cleaner references for the engine and transmission components. So for now that is where this project is. FROG-7 Now it brings me to this. A, Zill- 135 carrier, with a Luna-M Tactical Missile, and a 9P113 Launcher. That's a bad boy! That can be nuclear armed. The 9M21 missile is the very one pointed at my back yard during the Cuban Missile Crisis when I was a kid. I finally chose this for a lot of reasons, that I know are just going to hurt me. The main thing that grabbed me about this, is the idea of these rounded body panels and how molded they appear. In fact, they are molded. Sprayed into a mold, fiberglass body panels. All the body panels on the launcher are fiberglass with the main chassis and drive line iron and steel. I have no clue how I'm going to do that. Thinking back, I could just kick myself for not thinking of how to do a lot of things on the Maz build. So keeping that in mind I have a list of things that I want to accomplish with this build. The very first thing with this build is the scale. I'm so used to building in 1/16 and 1/20 scale, that anything smaller is getting to hard to see and work with. I had considered building this ugly Frog prince project the same scale as the Maz so I could put it in the same junkyard. But when I looked at how big this is, even at my build scale, 1/25, the frame is just about as big as the Maz was at 1/20 scale. I also considered that at 1/25 scale I have a new world open up to me with all the aftermarket details. Just about anything I need to accomplish the details I want to try. I have recently discovered something that i'm sure that all you guys already know. In that, it is a hobby unto itself just collecting items for our hobby. I would like to articulate the doors and panels. I tried this with limited success during the Maz build. But also the suspension, the steering, the windows, the launcher and the crane... I also need a good stretching in the detail department with hose fittings and wiring and such. Look at all that junk to detail. This going to be a real royal pain! I've been here a few years now and have seen some great builders with great techniques and materials usage, and I'm looking forward to stealing everything I can from everybody to help me work in a smaller scale with more details. The last thing I do in my personal build style is , after I get all the patterns and references together. I gather the build materials. I have all of the basic styrene material, and I'm looking for the 3rd party details as their need arise. The first part of the build is the main, Straight Rail X-Frame. I'll be back, Thanks All.
  22. 1:48 Fairey Firefly Mk.1 Trumpeter Catalogue # 05810 The Fairey Firefly was a British Second World War-era carrier-borne fighter aircraft and anti-submarine aircraft of the Fleet Air Arm (FAA). Designed to the contemporary FAA concept of a two-seat fleet reconnaissance/fighter, the pilot and navigator/weapons officer were housed in separate stations. It was superior in performance and firepower to its predecessor, the Fulmar, but entered operational service only towards the end of the war when it was no longer competitive as a fighter. The limitations of a single engine in a heavy airframe reduced its performance, but it proved to be sturdy, long-ranged, and docile in carrier operations. The primary variant of the aircraft used during the Second World War was the Mk I, which was used in all theatres of operation. In March 1943, the first Firefly Mk Is were delivered but they did not enter operational service until July 1944 when they equipped 1770 Naval Air Squadron aboard HMS Indefatigable. The first operations were in Europe where Fireflies carried out armed reconnaissance flights and anti-shipping strikes along the Norwegian coast. Fireflies also provided air cover during strikes on the German battleship Tirpitz in 1944. The Fairey Firefly served as a fleet fighter but in post-war service, although it was superseded by more modern jet aircraft, the Firefly was adapted for other roles, including strike operations and anti-submarine warfare, remaining a mainstay of the FAA until the mid-1950s. UK and Australian Fireflies flew ground attack operations off various aircraft carriers in the Korean War. In foreign service, the type was in operation with the naval air arms of Australia, Canada, India and the Netherlands whose Fireflies carried out a few attack sorties as late as 1962 in Dutch New Guinea. Throughout its operational career, the Firefly took on increasingly demanding roles from fighter to anti-submarine warfare stationed mainly with the British Pacific Fleet in the Far East and Pacific theatres. Fireflies carried out attacks on oil refineries and airfields and gained renown when they became the first British-designed and -built aircraft to overfly Tokyo. Extract from Wikipedia The kit This is a 2018 new-tool kit of this rather strange and awkward-looking fighter aircraft, and I’m actually quite pleased to see it, being a fan of the odd and esoteric. Of course, the new Trumpeter release isn’t the first Firefly in 1/48, with the Grand Phoenix/AZ Model kit being around in some form for the last 17yrs. There is also the extensive range of Special Hobby kits which show the Firefly in numerous marques. I have to say that I would’ve liked one of the AZ Model release with their beautiful resin interior and gear bay sets, but never got the opportunity to pick one up. I was pretty pleased when this Trumpeter kit was sent out for me to look through and interested to see how a modern tool of this aircraft would stand up to scrutiny. Trumpeter’s new Fairey Firefly Mk.1 comes in a fairly shallow box that is stuffed full of plastic. In total, there are SIX sprues of light grey styrene and one of clear parts. Apart from a sprue of which two are supplied, all sprues are packed individually into clear, heat-sealed sleeves. The clear parts have some extra protection by being wrapped in a piece of foam. A single PE fret is included, a large decal sheet, and of course the instruction manual. The kit itself is listed by Trumpeter as thus: Model Brief:Length: 236.5mm Wingspan: 282mm Total Parts: 100+ Photo Etched Parts: 1 piece Total Sprues 7 sprues Released Date: 2018-02 More Features: The kit consists of over 100 parts - fuselage & wing with finely engraved panel lines Sprue A The size of the Firefly becomes apparent when you see the size of the full span wing. This model is almost 12 inches across, which for a 1/48 WW2 fighter, is no shrinking violet. The upper wing panels are moulded as traditional port and starboard parts. Looking at the parts, you’ll immediately notice that the ailerons are moulded as one with the lower wing, with the upper panels being cut-out to accommodate the separate upper aileron half. Whilst this should look perfectly good from above, there isn’t much in the way of demarcation from below, so running a scriber over this area to deepen the panel line, should improve things massively. Trumpeter has made the landing flap as separate parts, with this area having no detail within, as per my references. Surface textures feature finely engraved panel lines, access panels, and key lines of rivets and fasteners, but not too much as to ruin the appearance. Inside the upper wing panels, a stiffening web is moulded to reduce and lateral flexibility in the assembled wing. A wing leading edge lens will be fitted from the clear sprue, and the gun barrels are also separate items. Sprue B Here, the main parts are for the fuselage, moulded full length, but minus the vertical fin which will be added later in construction, along with the rudder. Again, surface details and textures are actually very good, with some nice cowl fastener details on the nose. The cowl intake is moulded as a separate piece with integral sloping channel, and this will be augmented by the inclusion of some PE grilles. No detail is included within the fuselage as the cockpit are built from separate crew tubs. I’m perhaps a little disappointed at the apparent simplicity of the cockpit itself, especially in comparison with the AZ Models resin parts, and even the Special Hobby releases. Checked against reference, Trumpeter has created quite a rudimentary interior which will need to be improved somewhat for it to pass muster. Simple side wall and bulkhead details are included, such as formers and stringers, plus wiring and avionics, but they all look rather sparse. I know Eduard will be releasing some sets for this kit, so I’m hoping that they manage to create some visually interesting stuff in this area. Sprue C As well as the rather plain cockpit seats, we have the instrument panel with details which I think could be made to look really good when complete, such as the nicely recessed instruments with no gauge detail. There is an instrument panel decal for this, but I suggest ditching that in favour of aftermarket. I highly recommend Airscale instrument and placard decals for this sort of work. The stabiliser is provided as a full-span upper and lower panel into which the rear fuselage will nicely recess. Elevators are also separate and fitted via tabs, although it will be easy to modify these to be fitted dynamically. A two-part rudder is included, with panel line and rivet detail, but I’m pretty sure these were fabric covered on at least the Mk.1. I stand to be corrected. Other parts on here include the port and starboard landing flaps (with no interior detail, but that appears to be correct), nose intake and integral channel, vertical fin and tail wheel/strut, moulded as halves. Sprue D I’m quite surprised that Trumpeter chose to mould their wheel bays in this fashion. They have moulded the wheel recesses as drum shaped sections that don’t extend too much beyond their openings. These areas had straight-edged walls that formed a box which had two corners clipped, so I’m struggling to see why Trumpeter did this. Gear bay doors look good, but again, the details seem very, very simplified with missing elements. The wheels don’t look particularly weighted in appearance. Outer hubs are, to be honest, a comedy parody of the real four-spoked appearance. The undercarriage legs look good, with sharp detail, but again are very simplified in comparison with the real thing. Side cheek intake channels are moulded here, separate to the actual engine cowl, and you’ll also notice the two-part spinner with separate prop blades. Exhaust stubs aren’t hollow, and the shapes look all wrong and lack the droop effect of each stub. Sprue E Two things I like about Trumpeter clear parts is that they are almost always bright in appearance and perfectly transparent. Ok, a third…the framing lines are also nicely defined. I really can’t criticise anything here. A major point here is that the canopies aren’t designed to be posed in the open position, but if that cockpit isn’t your main raison d'être for this model, then a closed hood could be a good compromise. Sprue F (x2) These sprues concern the external payload of the Firefly and include parts to build two bombs along with their pylons, and also a set of eight rockets that are pre-moulded to their respective pylons. The patter has separate fin parts, although a little clunky in appearance. Photo Etch A single PE fret is included, with just three parts. These are for the intake and radiator areas and the aerial mast. Quality is good, with small tags holding everything in place. Decals I think these are a locally printed solution as there isn’t anything with any printer name to see. A large, single sheet contains the markings for four machines, including the black and white stripes for the wings and fuselage on one machine. No stencils are supplied. Printing is glossy, thin and with minimal carrier film. Registration also seems good to my eye. The four schemes offered in this release are: Firefly FR.1, FAA 766 Sqn. DK477, RNAS Lossiemouth, 1949 Firefly Mk.1, 827 NAS FAA Firefly Mk.1, July 1943 Firefly Mk.1, DK438, 1771 Sqn. HMS Implacable, 1945 Instruction Manual The manual shows the construction of the Firefly over 14 simple, unambiguous stages, with clear line drawing illustrations. Colour reference is supplied in Gunze colour codes, and PE placement is obvious. A parts map is also included. A colour sheet is included, highlighting the four schemes, with good scheme depiction and paint call-outs, plus decal placement. Other paint codes are supplied for Vallejo, Model Master, Tamiya and Humbrol. Conclusion This is pretty much a mixed bag, especially for a new-tool kit. Whilst I quite like the exterior (to which I would add extra riveting), the interior is somewhat lacking, and many details are also too simplified. I don’t know if Trumpeter actually ever saw a Firefly before tooling this kit, or even bothered to Google a few images. Such a shame really, but I’m sure the aftermarket boys will be able to fix the wheels and interior, and maybe even the wheel wells, and help us to create something that’s actually rather nice. It’s a nice base from which to work if you want to put the extra effort in without seeking out the AZ Models release. For me, I’d quite like the resin of the AZ kit and to graft it in here. I usually like to be able to point out issues in a review and then to come up with solutions, but for many things here, I’m afraid that I’m at a loss. My sincere thanks to Pocketbond for sending this kit out for review here on LSM. To buy this kit, check out your favourite local or online retailer.
  23. Joined just for this thread Was quite happy with the kit seat until I saw this Off to eBay now
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