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Search the Community: Showing results for tags '1/32nd scale'.



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Found 3 results

  1. You know those occasions when you get a crazy idea and just have to give a try? Well this is one of those. There's far from any guarantee of success or completion, but fortune favours the brave and all that..! Having a real soft-spot for the Avro Shackleton I've decided to do something really stupid and have a go at scratch-building one in 1/32nd scale. As I'm sure we're all aware there's kits available in 1/72nd and 1/48th scale, but nothing in 1/32nd so the only option is to start from scratch. I have an old ID Models 1/32nd Lancaster in the stash, and always planned to convert that to a Lincoln. However, when doing some research on the Lincoln I discovered that the wing and centre section (although widened on the Shackleton) were in essence the same airframe. Therefore I thought, making a Shackleton using the Lancaster as a parts donor could be a viable option... The first phase of the project was to find some plans. The Warpaint Series on the Shackleton came up trumps, and although these plans are far from perfect they've given me enough to get started. I duly enlarged them to 1/32nd scale and cobbled together a reasonable outline for a MR2 which is the version I'm hoping to replicate. You can see the size this model will (hopefully) be when finished when you put the Airfix 1/72nd kit on top: With that done it was sourcing the key components of a project like this - various thicknesses of plastic card: And of course the ID Models Lancaster: I then set about building up the centre section from plastic card formers, using the bomb bay roof as the structural centre-point. Wing spars have been made integral to the structure for strength and stability. I'm not going to worry too much about an interior to the fuselage, as it'll all be sprayed black and next to nothing will be visible through the small fuselage windows. The forward flight deck area will be fully replicated, though: The plan is to use the Lancaster fuselage sides for the 'skinning' of the model, and other areas will be 'planked' and blended with filler from thin plastic card strips. With the fuselage centre section progressing well and having cut my teeth on making bulkheads and formers etc., I had the confidence to have a go at making the nose section. This is a lot more tricky as there are many complex shapes and subtle curves to try to replicate, especially around the extreme nose where the bomb aimer/gunner's glazing. Again, the interior won't an accurate structural representation of the real thing, but being black and only the extreme nose interior being visible there shouldn't be too many problems here. As with the fuselage, the basic shape of the formers were made from plastic card and assembled to give a skeleton that'll be skinned in due course: I haven't made the 'roof' to the nose compartment yet as some form of interior needs to be added, as well as the observer/gunner's transparencies and its associated fairings: So this is where we're currently at: And alongside the 1/72nd scale version for a 'size reality check!' As I said at the start, there's no guarantee of success in the long term, but I'm having a blast right now! Tom
  2. Evening all, I've just finished building this as a mojo-mender as with a few long term projects on the go, I'd become bogged down and in need of something that went together without problems - this 1/32nd scale twin-stick MiG-29UB proved to be just the medicine. I picked this up at Telford for £25 which proved to be very good value for money. It's quite simple kit but in truth that's why I chose it - the cockpit lacks detail and the undercarriage bays are very basic, but the overall fit and construction is excellent and I encountered no construction issues at all. I used the decals from the box, which represent a MiG-29UB of 120 IAP based at Domna, Siberia, in the summer of 2003. Revell's colour guidance could only be interpreted by someone with a masters degree in colour mixing, so instead I just used pictures on the net for guidance, using mainly US equivalents from Xtracolour to get a close-enough match to the real thing. Other than that, it's as it comes in the box. Mikoyan MiG-29UB, Domna Air Base, Siberia, 2003. Jet pipe detail isn't too bad at all: Cockpit detail is pretty basic but some Airscale placards and dial decals and a belt set from Eduard means it's passable when peering through the canopy: The overall quality of the surface detail is excellent in my opinion: Wheel bays are basic but when sitting on its undercarriage very little is visible anyway: If you're thinking about a good value, large scale modern-era jet fighter, then I'd recommend this kit wholeheartedly... Tom
  3. This is my first completed build for 2016 - the 1/32nd scale Heinkel He 111 P-1 from Revell. I started this back in the summer of 2015 as a 'pick it up and do a bit as you fancy it' build, and I've been working on it on and off for the last 6 months or so. I have built it more or less out of the box, but I did add some Eduard detailing for the seatbelts and instruments etc, as well as some brass barrels for the guns as the kit's are undersized. It was an absolute joy to build and went together beautifully - very little filler was needed and it proved to be a completely trouble-free project. The only tricky and more time consuming part was the extensive glazing which required careful masking and painting both inside and out. All that glass and no protection 'up front' makes you realise how exposed these chaps were when a fighter sprayed that area - it doesn't bear thinking about the carnage that would ensue in the nose when under attack. Xtracolour enamels were used throughout, with the kit decals also being used which were flawless. The swastika was not included so this was sourced from an Xtradecal sheet, and the whole paint job was finished off with a spray of Humbrol flat varnish. If you're thinking of venturing into larger scale models I'd heartily recommend this kit - it was an absolute joy. Heinkel He 111 P-1 of III.KG 27, Delmenhorst, Germany, Summer 1940. It's also BIG - the He 111 is considerably larger than I had anticipated (span of just over 74ft) and not much smaller than a B-17. Make sure you leave plenty of shelf space! Tom