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Found 21 results

  1. Hello Friends of the Whistling Death, Some years ago i had the chance to take some Pictures of a F4U-1A flown by Major Gregory "Pappy" Boyington. I hope that might be of help to the many builders of that fascinating plane. I hope you enjoyed the tour. Greetings Rob
  2. By the way of introducing myself I wanted to show the mighty F4U I built some time ago. When I was young I was building all the MatchboxAirfixRevellandevensomeTamiya stuff. About thirty years later I decided to reenter the Hobby because I found it really relaxing to give my best in Modelling after hard days at work. I'm not fixed on special subjects, so I do Airplanes as well as Armour and even some Steampunk and Science Fiction Stuff and Figures and there is no special era which I prefer. A Subject has to be of some fascination esthetically, in a technical way, or just be the perfect Subject to learn new techniques. Most of the times I loose interest when a kit is finished, it is more the building, painting and weathering I'm in for. Actually Im not building because I'm moving from Germany (You already guessed that English is not my Mother Language) to Spain and not only my Modelling stuff is in a Container somewhere on the Atlantic Ocean. The Corsair attracted me by it's look of grace and sheer power an I liked the Early war colors of the bird.It was the third Modell of my new career and there were some goals to achive and techniques I wanted to give a try. I wanted to go multimedia and added a lot of AM so that there would be no excuse for fails. KIt: Tamiyas 1/32 Birdcage Corsair an excellent Kit AM: Not really needed except for the wheels - Brassin Cockpit, excellent, but not much of the work will be seen. Lots of scraping and grinding was necessary to fit the cockpit into the fuselage - Brassin Engine, excellent, but I had my Issues later to be mentioned - Eduard PE and Placards - Maketar Masks, I didn't want to Use the Decals for Insignia, Numbers and Walking lines. - SAC Metal Landing Gear, nice but definitely not a must - Brassin wheels as mentioned - Lifecolor and Tamiya Colors, I like to work with Lifecolor in my Airbrush, less sputtering then other brands So there she is. Don't judge to hard on the bird and on my photo-skills, both are on their way of improving. Still on the Bench: And finished: For sentimental reason I will stress the engine theme a little. I loved the build of the Brassin-Engine a lot, it was tempting an satisfying an was a first for me handling huge amounts of resin and metal parts. There were some really upturning Moments in that period of the build. I used blue Micro Mask to mask off the Aluminium areas of the Cylinders and spraying the black air guiding parts. I will never use that stuff again, because it sticks like hell and is nearly impossible to remove, but the worst was yet to come. I decided that I want to show the engine details through removable cowlings. I failed after different attempts first using the Kit plastic parts (even thinned), second using the Brassin cowlings and at last bending and soldering PE-cowlings. But it was impossible to get a god fit and just snap lock the parts, so I ended the nightmare gluing everything closed. One more thing I learned was that it is better to do the wiring by yourself, then using PE ones which always look a little to flat (like the great build of DannyVM). I hope you enjoyed the ride Greetings Rob
  3. July 2016 | HGW Newsletter

    Hi guys, some news from July 2016. Thanks for checking it out. http://hgwmodels.cz/en/blog/news/july-2016-newsletter Martin HGW
  4. 1:32 F4U-1A cockpit

    1:32 F4U-1A cockpit Eduard 'Brassin' Catalogue # 632053 Available from Eduard for €41,25 Bunny Fighter Club price: €35,06 It hasn't taken Eduard as long to release a complete cockpit upgrade for the recent 1:32 Tamiya F4U-1A Corsair as it did for the initial Birdcage variant, and I'm pretty pleased about that. Having the kit in my stash for a pending magazine project, and knowing the level of detail within the cockpit, it may seem surprising that a whole resin replacement is now available, but just wait until you see this! You really won't want to build that kit without first seeing the detail that this upgrade offers. Before you say it though, yes, this set does differ from the original F4U-1 cockpit. I can't give a list of general changes, but the pilot seat on the F4U-1A set is in a higher position than it its predecessor. Eduard have used their satin black cardboard package for this release, and before you open it, you can feel that it's quite weighty. When opened, you'll see that part of that weight are the four, double sided and folded instruction sheets required for this project, followed by SIX bags of resin which is cast in a combination of light grey, mid grey and clear, plus a small wallet with two PE frets and an instrument panel decal. Two casting blocks are packaged within the main box, un-bagged due to their delicate nature. The resin parts are protected within the box by pieces of soft grey foam, and the instructions are wrapped around these for extra security. This is going to be no quick project, and the FOURTY-NINE pieces of resin and around SIXTY photo-etch parts, are testimony to that. Strangely enough, I'm attracted to the bag with the two largest parts first, plus those loose parts: Eduard appear to use the darker resin for the thinner components, and here, these are the deeply curved floor and the upper side walls which are attached at a late stage in construction. Light grey resin is used for the forward and rear bulkheads. The detail within these key areas is stunning, with plenty of subtle detail hiding around the key structures and avionics/pipework/cabling. I have to say that some carefully applied washes and dry brushing will bring levels of detail out that would normally be overshadowed by the larger cockpit components. Holding the various parts together, you can see that a lot of effort has been made in ensuring that detail areas, such as constructional elements, line up perfectly, as was seen in the 1:48 Spitfire Mk.IX cockpit replacement set. There are a number of minor webs on the cockpit floor, underneath cabling and pipes, and this will need careful trimming away. This goes for the main, central web in the floor too. These thinner, fragile parts are connected to their casting blocks via thin resin walls which look easy to remove and clean up. You will fine smoothly recessed areas on the sidewalls into which the side consoles will neatly fit, so there will be no guesswork here. A number of avionics boxes and cabling are included too. The main, light grey components for the bulkheads are a detail painters dream; especially the forward bulkhead with its mass of pipes, wiring, junction boxes etc. My only real criticism of these parts are the quite thick casting blocks which will need some elbow-grease to remove and clean up. This is a very complex set and one which will bore the pants off you if I describe every single piece (many of which I couldn't' even put a name to), so from here, let's take a look at this bag by bag, with photos, using captions where appropriate. I will also highlight anything which I think you should be aware of. Wallet 2 Wallet 3 Wallet 4 Here we can see that Eduard have given the choice of two different instrument panels. A full resin part is supplied, including cast instrument detail. Those instruments also have dial detail, so unless you're into dry brushing and micro-detail painting, you might prefer the other option. That second option is a resin panel with only a minor amount of cast detail. A first layer of PE is then applied, and then the instrument decal. Finally, a PE fascia is overlaid to complete the panel. This will be painted, and onto this you will lay the instrument decal before then applying the fascia. In an unusual move, this fascia panel is supplied as base brass, and is not colour-printed. Wallet 5 Wallet 6 All resin parts have been thoughtfully connected to their casting blocks in the least obtrusive manner possible. Many connecting areas fall along assembly joints, or will be hidden from view, despite them not really being a problem anyway. Eduard has mastered the easy to remove system for casting blocks, with only those two bulkhead parts having blocks which will require some substantial effort to remove. Many parts are also quit e fragile-looking, such as various pipes etc, and again we see these parts cast in the darker grey resin, which perhaps is a little different and more resilient to being handled. No flaw can be found anywhere, such as breakages, bubbles or short cast. This is as good as it can possibly get. Photo Etch There are two PE frets in this set, with one being colour-printed, and the other in bare brass. The colour fret contains the seatbelt set which is composed of belts and separate buckles. I think I prefer the textile belts to these though, for a more realistic effect and weathering possibilities. The second fret holds the various instrument panel layers, with neatly etched bezels. A series of levers are included too, as well as pedal adjustment ratchets and various brackets. Etch quality is excellent, and small connecting points mean parts will be easy to remove from the fret. Instructions There is a LOT of work involved in assembling this, and an even bigger job in painting it, but that is fun, right? There's no doubt that Eduard have done an admirable job in presenting the various constructional sequences with relative clarity. Newly attached parts are shown in blue ink, whilst any surgery required to the host kit, is inked in red. There is indeed some surgery to perform, but this seems to be limited to the removal of the moulded structures (frames) within the cockpit, and no actual wall thinning is required. This should be a relatively easy project to install within the plastic. Colour reference codes are supplied for Mr Hobby paints, throughout construction. A useful parts map, with part numbers, is supplied on the rear page of the manual. To complete the cockpit assembly, you will need a little lead, tin or copper wire for various tasks. Conclusion In the UK, you can buy this set for £30 to £35, and whilst the Tamiya kit itself can be bought for around £90 to £95 (cheaper from Lucky Model etc), it seems like quite a high proportion of cost to spend on just the cockpit. Having said that, the sheer number of parts in this set, and how thorough it is, for me, is a perfect reason to do so. It seems incredulous that you could improve the Tamiya kit parts to such an extent that you'd scrap them completely, but this is exactly what this set provides, at the same time, offering a mammoth leap in detail over the original. For me, this set is a MUST! Very highly recommended My sincere thanks to Eduard for the review sample seen here. To purchase directly, click THIS link. James H
  5. 1:32 F4U-1A BIG ED

    1:32 F4U-1A BIG ED Eduard Catalogue # BIG3349 Available from Eduard for €71,25 Bunny Fighter Club price: €60,56 Yes, the ‘Birdcage’ Corsair was nice, but the one we all really wanted to see was the bubble canopy variant! Of course, after a period of selling their initial tooling, the F4U-1A was released in the last months, and despite Tamiya’s reputation for moulding and engineering excellence, it sure doesn’t stop Eduard bringing out a number of upgrade and detail sets. These are now packaged in the popular BIG ED set, saving you a little money. As I write this, a new F4U-1A specific Brassin cockpit has also just arrived, and we’ll bring that to you as soon as we can. In the meanwhile, let’s see what’s inside this new BIG ED set. I also enclose separate product links, as well as the one for the whole suite. BIG3349, F4U-1A (for Tamiya kit), €71,25 32365, F4U-1A engine 32366, F4U-1A exterior 32828, F4U-1A interior S.A 32829, F4U-1A placards 32784, F4U seatbelts JX176, F4U-1a masks F4U-1A engine All photo-etch sets here are packaged into Eduard’s familiar, slim letterbox format sleeves, with a protective card inner. This particular set contains two, bare brass PE frets which include detail for the engine, radiator cooling flaps, and also a set of replacement PE engine cowls. A small amount of remedial work will need to be carried out, such as drilling holes so that ignition lines may pass, and also removal of the sockets around the collector ring. I’m not a massive fan of this, and flat ignition wires. I would perhaps just drill the plastic sockets, and add lead wire, using the wiring guide here. Other areas of detail are very good though, such as the small actuators which sit within the cooling flap ring. These will take a little time to assemble. Those internal faces also undergo a change, with a metal facing plate for each one. A real seller for me is the inclusion of the main circular cowls, which after being belt to shape, are then lines with the internal framework. These should look very nice when complete. It’s just a pity the metal is bare brass, as chipping down to a nickel-plate surface would have looked excellent. F4U-1A exterior This is a single-fret release which helps to tidy up a few areas that Tamiya were a little remiss with, such as the bare ends of the wing flaps, and a little rib detail etc. A suite of wiring looms are also included for use in the gear bay and wing fold area too. A notable area of change is the tail wheel bay where various brackets and a box are installed, onto which the rudder cable horn will be attached. That’s a particularly nice touch, onto which you can possibly add the wires/rods too. A bare minimum of surgery will be required for this set, and nothing too worrying either; just a little end rib detail removal on the flaps. Certainly no headache F4U-1A interior S.A As the suffix denotes, this set contains self-adhesive parts, which I’ve always found to work very well due to adhesive strength. Just make sure you align things before setting them together! This set contains TWO frets; one in nickel and printed in colour, and the other in bare brass. The first fret is essentially the various cockpit consoles, switches etc, along with the now familiar two part, layered instrument panel. This layered approach also applies other elements within this set. Colour printing is excellent, but of course, you will need to remove a certain amount of detail so you can install everything. The second fret is where the rest of the detail comes into play, with everything from foot pedal sheathing and brackets, through to upgrades for the fire extinguisher and its mounting bracket. This fret offers a lot in terms of detail which Tamiya missed out, whereas the first fret deals with upgrading current detail, mostly. Other parts on this fret include more wiring looms for bulkheads, seat detail, sidewall detail including throttle and avionics upgrades, and also edge trimming for the canopies, instead of the smooth plastic edge that companies still seem to mould on their kits. This set is NOT to be used in conjunction with the forthcoming resin cockpit set, and must simply be used to detail the plastic kit parts. The resin pit will contain its own PE sets, and a number of details will be incorporated within the resin itself. This is a very nice upgrade set, but with some careful surgery required to install it. F4U-1A placards Again, this set contains a single fret, but with quite a high parts count. As well as the actual placards, there are some parts that appear to be duplicated from the Interior set, including console detail, and a good number of the avionics. However, some parts are present only this set, such as the data and manufacturer plate for the Pratt & Whitney engine. I would have though these would have been included in the engine set! It sort of makes this set reasonably important if you bought the other sets, despite the duplications. This set would be a perfect stablemate to the Zoom Interior set, if you don’t want to bother with the other sets in this schedule. F4U seatbelts I’m not really a believer that you either love or hate photo-etch, colour seatbelts. I have activelt tried to avoid them in favour of the textile belts, but I recently had to use a set inside my 1:32 Do 335, and I have to say that they were actually very easy to use. A couple of toothpicks were used form a ‘wave’ into the belts, so they weren’t absolutely straight, and of course, assembly is minimal. I think the overall effect was very good. This set consists of a single, colour PE fret that is beautifully printed. The stitching may look a little heavy, but in all, this should build up into a very attractive set. If you aren’t a fan of metal, then Eduard have released a set of fabric belts. F4U-1A masks These are a real time saver, and in my opinion, worth every penny. When you spend 4 hours masking a Mosquito cockpit, you really understand the true worth of having a specific masking set. Of course, the cockpit canopy is the main player here in this set, with the sliding hood being supplied as frame outlines only. Don’t fill in with liquid mask if you use Klear on your canopies, or you’ll fog things up. I would use scrap sheet infill to do the job. Masks are also supplied for wheel hubs and other small, peripheral detail. Conclusion Overall, these are excellent upgrade sets, despite some of the inclusions, omissions and layout being a little odd in places. Essentially, for the interior, you have numerous options to detail the kit, and I would look at the Eduard site and the instructions, and check exactly what each set offers you before you commit to buy. In all though, certainly worth checking out if you have one of the new release 1A kits in your stash. Highly recommended My sincere thanks to Eduard for these review samples. To purchase directly, click THIS link. James H
  6. 1:32 F4U-1A Corsair Engine Bay (for Tamiya kit) Grey Matter Figures Catalogue # GMALB3203 Available from Grey Matter Figures for £26.40 In actuality, this new set from Grey Matter Figures isn't an engine bay set, but what it does provide is the hardware to the rear of the engine bulkhead panel, on Tamiya's new Corsair releases. Tamiya does a good enough job of the engine anyway, and of course, there is an Eduard Brassin release, should you want to go the full aftermarket route. Up until now, however, you've had to option to open things up further. Let's take a look at this set and see what it offers, and how easy it looks to implement. This release is packages into an almost bomb-proof cardboard box, with a separate lid. The only identifier is a side label which actually identifies this set as a Corsair Accessory Bay set, which is sort of more accurate than the text on the instruction manual, but I digress. Inside the box, a small re-sealable bubble-wrap wallet is ever so neatly wrapped up further in red tissue paper. Those resin parts are split between three small zip-lock wallets inside the bubble-wrap sleeve. The instruction sheets are carefully folded and placed over the package contents. Anything I have ever received from GMF is always subject to the same rigorous, high standard of packaging. For a relatively small bay area, it was certainly very well-appointed, with hardly any breathing space in there. This set consists of TWENTY-THREE parts, cast in a supple, light grey resin. That area behind the engine actually contains the engine's supercharger housing, hydraulic reservoir, fire suppressor cylinder, two oil tanks, intake air duct system, and of course the engine bearer framework. There are other detail parts in there, such as a section of plumbing which stretches between each wing root. Of course, some remedial surgery will be required on your Tamiya kit, but nothing that should really cause any problem to the average model builder. You can pretty much build the kit up until the end of the wing stage. Here, you will need to place the interconnecting plumbing section along the forward main spar. This fragile part has a couple of small protectors cast onto its rear. Just remove and clean up. GMF's instructions do now say that when it comes to cutting away the forward fuselage panels, you can opt to remove just one side if you wish. If you decide to open everything up, fear not, because there are a couple of resin cowl pieces to display with the model, cast with interior detail. Also included are two forward wing-root faring points, where they meet the lower, forward cowl. Having all that interior detail would be pointless if there wasn't a new internal bulkhead, and the new GMF part is excellent, resplendent with raised rivet detail, as well as some wiring, and connector points into which you can add your own plumbing. The new engine mounting framework consists of four tubular, welded sections, which need little clean up, apart from removing the small resin casting lugs. These particular parts in my sample have the slightest bend in them, so will need a quick dip in hot water for them to spring back into shape. You will need to carefully follow the instructions, as the engine bearers and all that ancillary detail need to weave in and out of each other. Generally though, this looks a simple enough detail set to implement. Resin casting is excellent, with nothing more than the a few narrow pouring spouts to remove. Some parts don't even have this to bother you. The whole set seems to have been designed to cause as minimal amount of fuss as possible. I can't see any general casting flaws, but you will have to remove the very lightest of fuzzy flash off some parts, and the occasional paring seam. Again, only very minimal work required to ready this whole set for assembly. The instructions are printed across two sheets of heavyweight paper. Whilst the images look very good, some printing does seem to have suffered, with photographs looking washed out, while others retain deeper, richer appearance. If yours suffers from that, I would ask GMF to email you a replacement. The photos themselves have all parts clearly numbered against a key of all the parts within the set. That's a pretty neat touch. Where you need to pay extra attention to a specific point of construction, these are highlighted by the use of clearly annotated text boxes. Paint codes are also supplied in Tamiya format, so at least you'll have an idea of how this set should be painted. Of course, you should cross reference with any images that you can find online too. Conclusion There are a core of modellers who do like to see what lurks behind various cowls and panels etc. It's a sort of technical voyeurism. Also, if you want to depict a maintenance or crash site diorama, then this set certainly helps towards achieving that ambition. Whilst there are quite a lot of parts, construction, if taken carefully, shouldn't be a problem, and there is only minimal surgery required to the host kit. All parts are finely created too. In all, a really nice aftermarket set for your Tamiya Corsair! Very highly recommended My sincere thanks to Grey Matter Figures for sending out this review sample. To purchase directly, click THIS link. James H
  7. 1:32 F4U-1 cockpit

    1:32 F4U-1 cockpit Eduard 'Brassin' Catalogue # 632039 Available from Eduard for €41,25 Bunny Fighter Club price: €35,06 I'm actually quite surprised that it's taken Eduard so long to release a complete cockpit upgrade for the recent(ish) 1:32 Tamiys F4U-1 Corsair, especially with the bubble-canopy F4U-1A just around the corner. Still, it's probably true to say that the F4U-1 'Birdcage' will stay popular for a long time. Having seen the kit itself, and knowing the level of detail within the cockpit, it may seem surprising that a whole resin replacement is now available, but just wait until you see this! You really won't want to build that kit without first seeing the detail that this upgrade offers. Eduard have used their satin black cardboard package for this release, and before you open it, you can feel that it's quite weighty. When opened, you'll see that part of that weight are the four, double sided and folded instruction sheets required for this project, followed by SIX bags of resin which is cast in a combination of light grey, mid grey and clear, plus a small wallet with two PE frets and an instrument panel decal. Two casting blocks are packaged within the main box, un-bagged due to their delicate nature. The resin parts are protected within the box by pieces of soft grey foam, and the instructions are wrapped around these for extra security. This is going to be no quick project, and the FOURTY-NINE pieces of resin and around SIXTY photo-etch parts, are testimony to that. Strangely enough, I'm attracted to the bag with the two largest parts first, plus those loose parts: Eduard appear to use the darker resin for the thinner components, and here, these are the deeply curved floor and the upper side walls which are attached at a late stage in construction. Light grey resin is used for the forward and rear bulkheads. The detail within these key areas is stunning, with plenty of subtle detail hiding around the key structures and avionics/pipework/cabling. I have to say that some carefully applied washes and dry brushing will bring levels of detail out that would normally be overshadowed by the larger cockpit components. Holding the various parts together, you can see that a lot of effort has been made in ensuring that detail areas, such as constructional elements, line up perfectly, as was seen in the 1:48 Spitfire Mk.IX cockpit replacement set. There are a number of minor webs on the cockpit floor, underneath cabling and pipes, and this will need careful trimming away. This goes for the main, central web in the floor too. These thinner, fragile parts are connected to their casting blocks via thin resin walls which look easy to remove and clean up. You will fine smoothly recessed areas on the sidewalls into which the side consoles will neatly fit, so there will be no guesswork here. A number of avionics boxes and cabling are included too. The main, light grey components for the bulkheads are a detail painters dream; especially the forward bulkhead with its mass of pipes, wiring, junction boxes etc. My only real criticism of these parts are the quite thick casting blocks which will need some elbow-grease to remove and clean up. This is a very complex set and one which will bore the pants off you if I describe every single piece (many of which I couldn't' even put a name to), so from here, let's take a look at this bag by bag, with photos, using captions where appropriate. I will also highlight anything which I think you should be aware of. Wallet 2 Wallet 3 Wallet 4 Here we can see that Eduard have given the choice of two different instrument panels. A full resin part is supplied, including cast instrument detail. Those instruments also have dial detail, so unless you're into dry brushing and micro-detail painting, you might prefer the other option. That second option is a resin panel with only a minor amount of cast detail. A first layer of PE is then applied, and then the instrument decal. Finally, a PE fascia is overlaid to complete the panel. This will be painted, and onto this you will lay the instrument decal before then applying the fascia. In an unusual move, this fascia panel is supplied as base brass, and is not colour-printed. Wallet 5 Wallet 6 All resin parts have been thoughtfully connected to their casting blocks in the least obtrusive manner possible. Many connecting areas fall along assembly joints, or will be hidden from view, despite them not really being a problem anyway. Eduard has mastered the easy to remove system for casting blocks, with only those two bulkhead parts having blocks which will require some substantial effort to remove. Many parts are also quit e fragile-looking, such as various pipes etc, and again we see these parts cast in the darker grey resin, which perhaps is a little different and more resilient to being handled. No flaw can be found anywhere, such as breakages, bubbles or short cast. This is as good as it can possibly get. Photo Etch There are two PE frets in this set, with one being colour-printed, and the other in bare brass. The colour fret contains the seatbelt set which is composed of belts and separate buckles. I think I prefer the textile belts to these though, for a more realistic effect and weathering possibilities. The second fret holds the various instrument panel layers, with neatly etched bezels. A series of levers are included too, as well as pedal adjustment ratchets and various brackets. Etch quality is excellent, and small connecting points mean parts will be easy to remove from the fret. Instructions There is a LOT of work involved in assembling this, and an even bigger job in painting it, but that is fun, right? There's no doubt that Eduard have done an admirable job in presenting the various constructional sequences with relative clarity. Newly attached parts are shown in blue ink, whilst any surgery required to the host kit, is inked in red. There is indeed some surgery to perform, but this seems to be limited to the removal of the moulded structures (frames) within the cockpit, and no actual wall thinning is required. This should be a relatively easy project to install within the plastic. Colour reference codes are supplied for Mr Hobby paints, throughout construction. A useful parts map, with part numbers, is supplied on the rear page of the manual. To complete the cockpit assembly, you will need a little lead, tin or copper wire for various tasks. Conclusion In the UK, you can buy this set for £30 to £35, and whilst the Tamiya kit itself can be bought for around £90 to £95 (cheaper from Lucky Model etc), it seems like quite a high proportion of cost to spend on just the cockpit. Having said that, the sheer number of parts in this set, and how thorough it is, for me, is a perfect reason to do so. It seems incredulous that you could improve the Tamiya kit parts to such an extent that you'd scrap them completely, but this is exactly what this set provides, at the same time, offering a mammoth leap in detail over the original. For me, this set is a MUST! Very highly recommended My sincere thanks to Eduard for the review sample seen here. To purchase directly, click THIS link. James H
  8. We are working on new EagleCals for the Corsair F4U-1a, and will release them in 1:32, 1:48 and 1:72 for those interested! There are two sheets and we have just approved the profiles. Here they are in no particular order: We'll be putting them on the site soon for pre-orders, thanks! Judy - Eagle Editions Ltd.
  9. Has anybody heard about this yet? It's supposed to be out in November: http://www.hlj.com/product/tam60325
  10. F4U-1 Birdcage Corsair Placards Eduard Catalogue # 32 795 Available from Eduard for €7.10 Bunny Fighter Club price: €6.04 Yes, another Photo etch set from Eduard for the brilliant Tamiya 1/32 F4U-1 Birdcage Corsair. This time we look at the Placards set which consists of one plated and pre-painted fret of brass measuring 70 x 39mm with 74 parts on it. As can be seen, the set includes much of the detail panels around the cockpit, some detail for the Instrument panel shroud, some engine detail and a couple of placards for the main U/C legs. If you have looked at my review of the cockpit set, you will have noticed that most of this set is supplied with that set, so you may decide not to buy this one? However, the engine placards and undercarriage leg placards in this set are not included in any other set. You may also want to buy this one if you have the Eduard "Zoom" set for your cockpit. The instructions are supplied in the set as an A5 "printed on both sides" sheet. I have downloaded and printed the instructions in colour on A4 paper for this review. Sheet 1, covering cockpit detail and IP shroud instrumentation. Sheet 2, more cockpit detail, engine and undercarriage placards. As mentioned earlier, you may want to mix and match to get all the detail you want for your Tamiya Corsair, remembering one thing, any surplus parts from this set can be used on other kits of the same era. I'm sure some of the parts could find a home in the cockpit of a Hellcat, Avenger or Wildcat?? Thanks to Eduard for supplying this and all the other sets for the Tamiya 1/32 Corsair. All the sets will be used on my build of this wonderful kit here on LSM.
  11. F4U-1 Birdcage Corsair Seatbelt Set Eduard Catalogue # 32 784 Available from Eduard for €7.10 Bunny Fighter Club price: €6.04 Yet another upgrade set for the Tamiya F4U-1 Corsair, this time we look at the seat belts. This set is made from plated and painted brass, at the time of writing Eduard had just released the fabric belts, but they were not available for review. This set comes packaged in the normal clear sleeve with card insert, containing one plated and painted brass fret and one A5 sheet of instructions printed on both sides. The brass fret measures 70 x 34mm with 36 parts. As can be seen here, the stitching detail on the belts is nothing short of incredible. If you've ever used this medium for seatbelts you will know that they can be great or awful!! In my experience a gentle warm with a hair dryer before carrying out any sharp bends helps prevent the paint cracking. These instructions have been downloaded from the Eduard site and printed in colour on A4 paper... Sheet 1.. Sheet 2.. With care in the assembly process this set of belts will be very realistic. I will use them on my F-4 build and add a little wash to weather them and a coat of matt varnish to really make them pop. Sincere thanks to Eduard for supplying this review sample.
  12. F4U-1 Birdcage Interior Detail Set Eduard Catalogue # 32 781 Available from Eduard for €14.38 Bunny Fighter Club price: €12.23 Continuing with the reviews of all the Eduard sets currently available for the Tamiya F4U-1 Corsair, we now take a look at the Interior set. This is the full interior set, #32781. There is also a "Zoom" set available which does not include much of the pre-painted panelling or most of the second fret. For the extra cost, this set is by far the better choice in my opinion. So, what do you get for your money in this one?Two frets of brass is the answer, one plated and painted fret measuring 70 x 59mm with 75 parts and one unplated fret, measuring 111 x 70mm with 81 parts. The instrument panel and associated gauges are made up by laminating the gauge faces behind the panel itself. Sealed off with a drop of clear to replicate the glass, these panels will look awesome and really bring your cockpit to life. Fret 1.. As you can see, most of the parts are pre-painted, saving time as you build and giving you that superdetail that it would be near impossible to do with a paint brush. Much of this fret is also self adhesive.. Moving onto the larger unplated fret, we can see that much of the cockpit structure and ancillary equipment is included here... All of this thin sheet metalwork will raise your cockpit detail even higher than the wonderful Tamiya kit already does.. remember, the Corsair has a very deep cockpit with no floor as such, so is a major feature on any model, especially at this large scale. Here we can see the multi laminate design to accurately replicate the lever block attached to the starboard cockpit sidewall. More detail parts... The set is supplied in the usual clear plastic envelope with card insert. Also included are 4 sides of black and white printed A5 paper instructions. I have downloaded and printed off the instructions in colour, All Eduard instructions are available on their site as pdf. files. Sheet 1, Side consoles and rudder pedals are covered here... Sheet 2 looks at the bulkhead, IP, seat and "floor" structures. Sheet 3 covers yet more detail on the cockpit sidewalls and canopy framing. Notice top right the lever block we looked at close up earlier... Sheet 4 covers how to use the self adhesive panels. So there we have it, a very comprehensive detail set for a very comprehensive kit. I will be using all of the reviewed Eduard sets on my Corsair build here on LSM very soon. This is one section of the model I am really looking forward to, as it is such a major part of any Corsair model. Is this set worth the money? You bet it is!! Sincere thanks to Eduard for supplying this and all the other F4U review sets seen here on LSM.
  13. F4U-1 Birdcage Exterior Detail Set Eduard Catalogue # 32 344 Available from Eduard for €12.74 Bunny Fighter Club price: €10.83 Eduard wasted no time whatsoever in releasing all the Photo etch and Resin wheels for the amazing Tamiya F4U-1 Birdcage kit. This lovely Exterior set is one of those releases. I know what you're thinking right now... "The Tamiya kit is amazing, surely it doesn't need more detail"?? Yes, the Tamiya kit is a masterpiece and probably THE best engineered kit out there, in my opinion, but injection moulding does have limitations. Eduard have stepped in here to add the finest of details to the areas that even Tamiya couldn't produce in their amazing kit. Did I mention I like this kit?? This set of Photo etched parts is presented in the usual Eduard plastic sleeve with card insert, containing one unplated sheet of brass measuring 139mm x 70mm. Although the set is titled "Exterior", it consists mainly of parts for wells and the wing folds. The fact that the set contains a comparatively small number of parts is testament to the detail provided in the box of the Tamiya kit. So, what do we get in this lovely little set? Here's the Fret with 78 parts of etched brass... As we can see, there are many small brackets and pipes along with some larger panels. In this picture, we can see the panels that go onto the walls of the undercarriage bays. The kit parts have no rivet detail in these areas Along the sides of the large opening in the tail for the tail wheel and arrestor hook there is no detail in the kit. Eduard have provided these slim panels to add interest to this are. There are also many parts to superdetail the tail wheel bay internals. If you want to display your Corsair with flaps dropped, they look great this way in my opinion, you may want to add some detail to the outer edges of the plastic parts? Eduard provide the parts you need in this set, pictured here.. The wing fold area of the kit is lovely, with many beautifully moulded parts. Eduard have supplied all the necessary pipework and retracting elastic/springs to make this area of your model really come to life. Here's an example of what you get... The instructions for the set are supplied as two sides of black and white printed A5 paper. I have downloaded the instructions from Eduard's site and printed them in colour on A4 paper... Sheet 1, Tail wheel bay detail, oleo detail and flap end finishers. Sheet 2, Wheel bay detail and pipework for the wing fold. Note parts 3 and 4, the springs which pull the cables into the wing fold when retracting. So, we have a little set provided here which will enable us to build a masterpiece from an already amazing kit. If you are building your model wheels up, on a stand, there's no point in buying this set, however, if like me you will build your model on the tarmac with flaps down, this set is worth every penny. I will be using this set on my forthcoming build of this kit here on LSM. Thanks to Eduard for manufacturing and supplying this set. Watch this space for more reviews of Eduard sets for the Tamiya F4U-1 Birdcage Corsair.
  14. F4U-1 Birdcage Engine Detail Set Eduard Catalogue # 32 343 Available from Eduard for €14.38 Bunny Fighter Club price: €12.23 Eduard wasted no time whatsoever in releasing all the Photo etch and Resin wheels for the amazing Tamiya F4U-1 Birdcage kit. This lovely Engine dress up set is one of those releases. I know what you're thinking right now... "The Tamiya kit is amazing, surely it doesn't need more detail"?? Yes, the Tamiya kit is a masterpiece and probably THE best engineered kit out there, in my opinion, but injection moulding does have limitations. Eduard have stepped in here to add the finest of details to the areas that even Tamiya couldn't produce in their amazing kit. Did I mention I like this kit?? So, on to the set.... supplied in the usual plastic wallet with card insert containing two frets of unplated brass measuring 139 x 70mm each holding 57 and 89 parts respectively. Thanks go to Eduard for stopping the nickel plating on their brass frets, this makes soldering so much easier!! The set allows complete replacement of the cowling in a, "far more realistic than plastic" sheet metalwork assembly with crisp and precise inner and outer detail. There is also some beautifully rendered flap detail which is absent on the kit parts. This is Fret 1, covering the cowling inner framework and some smaller clamps and pipes... Fret 2, covering the outer cowling skins and cowl flap detail... So, now we will take a closer look at this lovely photo etch.. starting with the inner cowl detail.. Note the parts fold over to double the thickness adding more realism. Once rolled and mated up with the outer skins these will be very strong and realistic, and would look even better with added dents and corrosion ? Staying with Fret 1, here we can see the ring clamps to be added to the ends of 9 of the inlet manifold pipes. To the lower right, we can see the castellated nuts which will be rolled around the other 9 pipes. Stunning detail if you are showing your engine off. Moving on to Fret 2 we can see some of the finer cowl flap detail. Here we can see the inner flap skin and the three parts which make up each actuator!! Remember, all this is very visible on the Corsair with flaps open, it would look even better if one added the cabling between each actuator!! More inner flap detail.. The instructions are supplied as four sides of black and white printed A5 paper. I have downloaded the instructions form Eduard's site and printed them in colour on A4 paper. Sheet 1, covering removal of some of the plastic detail, drilling and adding the ignition cables... Sheet 2 , fitting of the hose clamps and inner cowl flap detail... Sheet 3, cowling assembly time.. Sheet 4, advertising their other sets, which will be reviewed fully here on LSM. This detail set is a valuable addition to an already well detailed kit, turning an amazing OOB model into a masterpiece. The set provides you with absent detail in the kit, and those beautiful cowlings will really bring a diorama to life. The cabling and pipework may not be to your liking, but it could always be coated in PVA, thick Gloss Enamel or even replaced with lead or copper wiring. I will be using this set on my forthcoming Tamiya F4U-1 build, along with every other Eduard set available for the kit.. Thanks to Eduard for designing, manufacturing and supplying this review sample. Watch this space for more Eduard reviews.
  15. Vought F4U “Corsair” Volume 1 Monograph #52 Tomasz Szlagor / Leszek A. Wieliczko Kagero Books (3052) Available from Kagero for €19,07 This is volume 1 so one or more volumes are on the cards, which is a good thing. The Corsair had a very long service life and was constantly being improved. Although there are only 96 pages, they are filled to the brim with information. There are three chapters with a Bibliography section and appendices. The whole book is very well researched without getting too deep into details. Timing is very good with the recent availability of the early Tamiya Corsair. What's in the book? The origin and development Obviously this deals with the design and development of the Corsair. The text deals with the conception and subsequent testing for service. Although the technical side is very well written it is not too technical. Good photographs showing the various versions and experimental types. The various users of the Corsair do get a mention as well as the difficulties with the Brewster license production. The reviewer never heard the name "Brewster Battler" but that is what Brewster apparently suggested. A two-seat version suggested by Vought is also included. The text also mentions that the Corsair was tested against contemporary US fighters but no reports are given unfortunately. Camouflage and markings Very useful section but dealing only with US Navy service during the period 1942-1945. good text reference to FS-numbers and heights mentioned of lettering and numbers. Also is mentioned whether a color was glossy or matt from the factory. Frontline service The majority of the book is reserved for frontline information in the Solomons and Rabaul theatre of operations from February 1943 to March 1944. The text reads nicely and you get a good idea about what it was like in the Corsair Squadrons. Combat reports give a good feel about the day to day operations. The famous “Black Sheep” Squadron led by Gregory Boyington is very well represented including a combat report of him being shot down in combat. Appendices Here is a summary of technical details about the Corsair such as performance, production statistics and engine specifications. Art work The last 8 pages are reserved for some great artwork of US Navy Corsairs. Pity that the British FAA and RNZAF Corsairs aren’t included. Pros Very readable text Good quality black & white photographs Federal Standard paint numbers Cons No FAA or RNZAF artwork No scale drawings Conclusion A very useful reference book for modellers and those interested in this great aircraft. This volume 1 gives a very good insight into the conception and development of the early Corsair version and the service history. The lack of scale drawings is a bit of a disappointment as these series usually have them included. Maybe we'll see them in Volume 2! Recommended Our sincere thanks to Kagero Publishing for the review sample. To purchase directly, click HERE. Cees Broere and Jeroen Peters
  16. F4U-1 Corsair Seat Belts

    Dear all, we just released laser-cut seat belts for F4U-1 Corsair from Tamiya. Few pictures: If you are fearless try to buy them in our NEW E-SHOP - direct link for this item here. You can also use our eBay store here. Hope you will be satisfied with this product. All the best Jan Bobek HGW
  17. Just ordered my Tamiya Corsair goodies (and some other) from them.
  18. Tamiya F4U-1 Corsair

    OK, throwing my hat into the ring here with the new Tamiya Corsair. I have wanted one of these since the day they released their 1/32 A6M5 Zero. I built that one a few years back, and was hooked! Since then, I have built their Spitfire and am nearing completion on the P-51D. I cannot wait to get started here! Not sure yet of the markings, will decide that later on. Probably a weary USMC bird though...
  19. Out of the box, with the exception of the decals, some of which I'll be replacing from EagleCals' "Birdcage Corsairs: Part 2" set: The current plan is a wings-down, wheels-up, in-flight rendition using the provided stand. Thinking now about whether or not it will be piloted and having trouble waiting until August 1st to get started...
  20. This is what I want to build. Two different schemes of Honduran Airforce Corsairs, this means I will build two kits!
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