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  1. 1/35 Transportwagen-Maus Profimodeller Catalogue # 35007 Available from Profimodeller for 6 990,00 CZK (approx. £245) The Transporterwagen-Maus was a 14-axle special transport vehicle of the German railways (Reichsbahn), which was developed and built to transport the Maus by the Graz-Simmering-Pauker works in Vienna. On account of the tank’s size and weight, a rail route between Berlin and Böblingen, had to be found, avoiding all tunnels and large bridges. This wasn’t at all an easy accomplishment, and resulted in an extremely convoluted route. Well, where do I even begin when it comes to this behemoth? Without a doubt, this is the largest, heaviest and most parts-numerous resin kit that I’ve ever been asked to take a look at. It’s also a subject that I know very little about, being primarily an aircraft modeller (with a spattering of Sci-Fi), so this review can only really look at what is presented, and compare the photos of the completed model, alongside the few images I have of the real thing. When I said this thing was large, it’s actually 720mm in length, with a track width of 41mm. This is a multimedia kit which is largely resin, but also has metal and PE elements, along with a small decal sheet. There are 930 resin parts. Yes, you read that correctly! Profimodeller’s Transportwagen-Maus is packed into a long and heavy carton with illustrative line drawings adorning the lid, and upon opening, a 28-page manual is found in the top, folded in half so that the narrow packaging can accommodate it. Underneath this is a plastic back that contains four large cardboard trays onto which the larger, longer and slab-sided components are secured. Each tray also contains an illustration of its contents. Removing this package reveals a set of TWELVE small boxes, each with a lid sticker that again highlights the package contents. Underneath these boxes lays a sleeve with two PE sheets and a single decal sheet, and a decal placement guide is folded neatly next to this. Lastly, some lengths of wire complete the contents inventory. Tray parts There are FOUR trays of very dark grey resin parts included, with adhesive foam being used to hold them in place. This is a neat method of fixing as the parts are slightly elevated from the card surface, so it is therefore easy to slip a knife underneath them and through the foam, in order to release the parts before you clean them up. Boxed parts There are TWELVE boxes of equal size, included with this release. Each box has a label attached to the top, showing an illustration of the included parts, and also a list which includes how many parts are within. I quite like this approach, and for something of this complexity, it’s a welcome inclusion. Most of the boxes have the parts within inside small zip-lock wallets. The only exceptions to this are some of the larger or more numerous parts, such as the railways sleepers etc. Most of these boxes are choc-full of parts, with most of them being connected to some sort of casting block. These look easy enough to remove, especially with a fine razor saw. Some smaller parts are cast onto a sheet, such as is seen with HpH model kits. A small number of other materials are also to be found in these boxes, such as rubber and copper wire. Parts quality is excellent, with only a small number of annoyances, such as some track sleeper clips broken away due to the mass packing of these parts into one of the small boxes. However, this is easily fixed. Photo etch and metal parts TWO PE sheets are included in this release, and whilst some folding is essential, there’s nothing here which will cause any headaches. It all looks like simple bending is all that is required, and the parts are generally large enough not to cause eye strain. PE production is excellent, with clean fold lines and edges. All parts are held in situ by small tags that shouldn’t cause any problem with cutting. A small file will be useful for finally cleaning up the locating points though. Two lengths of what looks like piano wire, are also included. This appears to be for various axels. Decals A single sheet is included, printed solely in white, and containing various stencils and serials that will be applied to the chassis etc. Printing is quite glossy and also suitably thin. There is no indication as to where these are printed, but having used Profimodeller decals before, I don’t foresee any issue at all. A sheet is included which clearly shows where the many stencils are to be placed around this model. There’s certainly enough to enliven what could otherwise have been an empty-looking finish. Instructions This comes in the forum of a series of A4 sheets, stapled together, and comprising 28 pages. All illustration is extremely concise in its line drawing depiction, with all parts being clearly annotated, meaning that they will be easy to locate within the numerous boxes and trays supplied in this kit. Colour references are given throughout construction, but not in any specific manufacturer paint codes. Illustrations are supplied at the end of the manual, showing the Transportwagen-Maus in various elevations. No photographic material is provided in the manual, but you can still find a number of historic images in an online search. Conclusion This build will be no walk in the part, whatsoever. It is both a complex and involved build that will dictate the modeller needing experience of working with this media. Of course, it will also require plenty of space for displaying the final result, but I’m not going to insult anyone’s intelligence as they should already have worked that small detail out. It’s also a very expensive kit, and you should be confident of your own skillset before contemplating a purchase. Having said this, if you want a 1/35 trailer for a Maus, then this is not only the only deal in town, but it is also superbly designed and accurate to the reference that I have been sent with regards to this release, but the kit is also very high quality. All resin is nicely cast, and the whole kit is thoughtfully packaged for ease of finding the parts you need amongst the 930 on offer! Current exchange rates put this kit at about £240, and of course, you will need to purchase your own Maus with which to display the trailer. Highly recommended (for the very experienced modeller) My sincere thanks to Profimodeller for the review sample seen here. To purchase directly, click THIS link. Please note that other related sets are available to use with this, and are available separately. These are: Maus Loading Ramp for 990,00 CZK (approx. £35) Tow Bar for 159,00 CZK (approx. £6) We did actually receive a little something extra with our sample, with the emphasis on the word ‘little’. This was a mini-Maus, seen here in the photos. This was a free gift which I presume comes with the main Transportwagen-Maus.
  2. 1:32 He-111 H-22 conversion with V-1 Profimodeller Kit No. P32314 Available from Profimodeller for €118,- Introduction What we have here is the set you need and want if you want to convert your He-111 H-6 kit into the H-22 version. This is the version that was designed to carry and launch a V1 in mid-air. Early in the war the V1’s were launched from the air, rather than from the ground. The strategy was to mount a V1 under the wing of a specially rigged He-111 and to fly at extreme low level towards the British coast. There the He-111 would quickly gain altitude to about 1.500 feet (450 meters) and launch the V1. The He-111 would then head for cloud cover to make it’s escape. The unit that operated these He-111 H-22’s was III/KG53, stationed in the Netherlands. About 100 of these H-22’s were built / modified and delivered to III/KG 53. In total over 400 V-1’s were launched this way... Most of them targeting London. Since the percentage of V-1’s actually hitting target was too low (about 20%) and about 80 of the 100 H-22’s were shot down by the RAF or AA, the way the V-1’s were launched changed from mid-air to ground installations. The kit Ok. This is a really detailed and delicate conversion / upgrade and needs some introduction. Profimodeller first released set P32297. This is the attachment for the V1 to the underside of the He-111 wing. When I first saw this up on their website I knew a V1 would follow soon, since there is no way in hell anyone would buy a detailed and accurate attachment for a V1, when there is no accurate 32nd scale V1 on the market! Don’t even try to mention the 35th scale Bronco offering. Let’s not go there… Indeed not much later Profimodeller released their V1 (P32279). A cool multi media kit with all the bells and whistles. I have reviewed this kit here. Not much later Profimodeller followed with a transport dolly and loader. A review of the loader (it’s called Anhanger, but it actually is a loader) can be found here (scroll down). At them moment I’m building the Profimodeller Schlepper, Loader and V1 and let me tell you: It will test you, but when you succeed you’ll feel like an actual modeller! Topic here. In addition Profimodeller also let’s you buy the He-111 H-22 conversion without the V1 attachment, here. Or the He-111 H-22 conversion, including the attachments AND the V1, here. So to be specific, if you want to go balls out, and make one impressive diorama: what you really want is this set, the loader, Schlepper, crew-set and the V1. This set alone will give you a He-111 H-22 with a lot of interior detail and V1 attachment points. I will now walk you through this set to show you exactly what you get. We have come accustomed to the small, cramped, top opening boxes from Profimodeller, but this one let’s you open the side, to make the contents slide out, protected by a cardboard sleeve. A big package of photo etch, bags of yellow and the famous Profimodeller black resin, a rubber hose, decals and instruction booklets appear. The biggest piece of resin in the box is the dorsal turret opening: Here's a look at the various bags containing resin, rubber, a vac form turret and lots of brass barrels. First bag of black resin. This stuff is easy to work with and really strong. Profimodeller really chooses where to use the more detailed yellow resin and where to use the strong black stuff: Nicely hollowed out and detailed flame dampers x 4, for the Jumo engines. REVI gunsight for the dorsal turret: The guns are nicely detailed as well. Open trigger guards of course: Chutes for the spent ammo: Crystal clear dorsal turret glass: The Zwilling guns: Included in this set is another small separate set. This contains flak helmets and oxygen apparatus for the crew. The helmet liners are offered in photo etch. This set also happens to be applicable to the Ju88. With this oxygen set comes a length of rubber hose you need to cut to length for the various oxygen masks: Here's the photo etch with the helmet liners and oxygen details: Now check this out. All the MG barrels are supplied in brass. Looks like Master models quality: Will you just look at all this photo etch... 3 giant sheets and two smaller. Lots of ammo bins... Bulkheads and lots of interior detail: See the radio's? Here we see the V1 attachment set. The separate instructions for this set were missing from my box, but they're also up on the Profimodeller site: The decals. Even though I love the way they go down, their colour and detail. I would suggest having masks cut for a bird this size: The colour schemes. And lots of them! 6 in total. The instruction booklet is clear but needs some practice and sometimes research to comprehend: A few more shots from the PM site. Verdict This set really blew me away. The amount of photo etch is staggering. The level of detail amazing. The only thing I missed in the box were the instructions for the V1 attachment, but these can also be found on the Profimodeller site. From experience I’ve learned that Profimodeller does not compromise on detail. And it’s exactly this trade of theirs that will cost you time and money, but trust me: in the end it’s worth it. VERY highly recommended. My sincere thanks to Profimodeller for this review sample. Jeroen Peters
  3. 1:35 Steyr K2670 Profimodeller Kit No. P35006 Available from Profimodeller for €56,- Introduction Another exotic subject from Profimodeller. This time some railway armour! Lately it’s been mostly Trumpeter covering german and soviet armoured railway subjects. From the amazing BR52, various panzer locomotives and a whole range of transport and armoured Canon- and Flakwagons. One even bigger than the other and often displayed in huge diorama’s. Like this: And even bigger: And bigger... But today we’re looking at a rather small, machine gunned armoured personell wagon. The Steyr K2670. The subject has been covered before by Hauler in 48th scale in resin, and in 72th scale by Planet Models. It even has been done in 35th scale before. Modellbau-Schmidt did a version in Vacu-form. Even more challenging than your normal resin kit. In the past you could also obtain a resin offering of the subject by the brand X-Project. It costed €43 at the time, and was only available through internet but I don’t think it’s available anymore. Here's the X-Project one: And here's the Vacu-form Modellbau-Schmidt one, with figures for size reference: This little armoured wagon could carry four MG’s, six soldiers and was powered by a Steyr engine with 72HP. That’s right: it was a self-powered vehicle. It had 14,5mm thick (or thin if you like) armour and weight 8 tonnes. The Steyr K 2670 (known also in German as: "leichte Schienenpanzer" - le.SP or "Panzersicherungswagen") was designed by the Austrian brand Steyr-Daimler-Puch AG in 1943, and at least 40 were built and delivered up to 1944. They were used for anti-partisan service in the Balkans. Due to the light axle pressure (4.7 t) they could operate on tracks in bad condition that were common in those areas. The Germans used these Steyr’s in train combinations of 10 coupled units. After WW2 one these Steyr’s was used by Poland. It is not known, how it got there. Possibly it was left in the German armoured train training center in Rembertów. It remained in service until the 1950’s. Very little reference material is left to date. But one K2670 survives to this day. Most likely the only survivor worldwide, and it belongs to Museo Diego de Henriquez, but it's on loan to the Railway Museum in Triëste, Italy. Check this link for a good reference walkaround: http://www.fahrzeuge-der-wehrmacht.de/Artikel/Panzerdraisine_Steyr_K2670.html Here's how it looks today (chipping fluid anyone?): The kit As always Profimodeller managed to cramp all the parts in neat little white boxes and fit these with all the photo etch in a small box, making it hard to re-pack after my review J. I’m glad to see a lot of typical Profimodeller black resin (I keep calling it resin, because I honestly don’t know whether this is plastic, resin or even Bakelite), since it never warps, shrinks or droops after a long period on the shelf. It’s strong, can carry a lot of weight and has crisp details. The base of the K2670 is made from standard yellow resin. The whole armoured cab is built up from the black resin walls (which require no clean-up), and so is the suspension and the beams for the track. Yes. A section of railroad track is included. Nicely detailed wooden beams with a lovely wood texture. I’ve seen wood textures before from Profimodeller that were sometimes a bit crude, but these beams are lovely. The tracks themselves are found curved in the box, made from another foreign material. I’d guess they’re plastic and they bend straight with little effort. Basic parts: I love this stuff: The chassis: More black resin parts for the cab, wheels and chassis: Let me lay them out so you can see better: Wheels: MG-port: Once the basic structure of the cab and the suspension is built a whole lot of details enter the scene. Exhausts, two armoured superstructures, a variety of hatches for looking and shooting through, handles, tools, etc… What I really love is the inclusion of weld beats. 10 long strips of very flexible, thin and detailed weld beats that follow the edges of the armour on the cab. The amount of photo etch is quite daunting. A huge sheet with all the hatches, handholds and toolclamps. The only small downside is the fact the kit isn’t designed to build with a troop-door posed open. Ofcourse you can, but you’ll have to cut a hole in the cab and scratch build details on the inside of the armoured door. Track beams: Array of resin details: Machine gun (four included): Tools: Exhaust can with lovely thin open ends: 10 strips of flexible weld beats: Two sheets of PE: Decals for three schemes are included. German yellow, Panzer grey and one with a camo pattern combination of these two colours. On the decal sheet you’ll notice WG1 through WG10 stencils. As mentioned before these Steyr’s travelled in a linked combination of 10. So these were to indicate their position in the pack. The decals: Schemes: Instruction booklet: Verdict Profimodeller never ceases to surprise. In a time where we are treated to a wide range of huge german railroad goodies this small armoured flea is a welcome addition. Great for a partisan diorama or just to add to your armoured railroad model collection. The multimedia parts offer lovely detail and obvious love for the subject, which appears to be very well researched. I know from experience that when you take your time and follow the instructions to the letter, these Profimodeller kits build up to real gems. The quality of the resin is forgiving and strong and the same goes for the Photo etch. VERY highly recommended. My sincere thanks to Profimodeller for this review sample. Jeroen Peters
  4. 1:32 Container Dobbas (for Ju-88) Profimodeller Catalogue # 32216 Available from Profimodeller for €44,95 Introduction Dobbas. I had to look this device up! During WW2 Allies and Axis alike developed all kinds of external cargo solutions for planes that were primarily not designed to transport cargo. Varying from personnel, weapons and supplies. During the war the Luftwaffe had a shortage of cargo planes, that were overstretched in use for replenishments of supplies. This particular device was developed at Rechlin in 1942, specifically for the He-111, Ju-88, Bf110 and Ju87. With a maximum loadout of 1061 Kg it was perfect for carrying the Pak 3,7cm / Pak 5cm / Luftlande Geschütz (paratrooper canon) / Gebirgsgeschütz (mountaineer canon) / Flak-canon 2cm / or a motorbike with sidecar. I would guess that the photo of the He-111 carrying the field canon shows the barrel protruding, since that’s the only way the gun would fit, and was not fit to be fired while airborne Slung under the He-111: And under the Bf110: And Stuka: And all on it's own... The kit This kit is mainly designed to mate with the Revell Ju-88 kit. However: with a little research this set can be made to fit the He-111 as well. The carrying frame you see in the pictures won’t be needed for other types than the Ju-88. What strikes me is that any other brand probably would have taken the easy route and made this set from all resin. However: this would have made the interior details almost impossible, since the sidewalls were very thin and because there is an amazing amount of structural detail for such a seemingly simple structure. When we open the typical, sturdy Profimodeller box we see 2 smaller boxes containing (and protecting) the bags with resin. We also see two sheets of PE and a small sheet with decals. The first bag with typical yellow resin contains the main tubular structure of the Dobbas and various tubular structural elements of the carrying frame. We also find here the two sidewalls. There is some light flash on the framing, but that can almost be cleared with the touch of your fingers. No warping and no broken parts. The second bag contains the black resin as we often see with Profimodeller which is stronger and has more characteristics of plastic than resin. Here we have the wooden floor boards (on which I myself would add more finer wooden texture than they have now, by scraping the teeth of my resin saw over the surface). We also see the optional skees, wheels and some internal details. I love this black stuff. Really adds strength and doesn’t compromise in detail compared to normal resin. Fastening lugs that are mount to the interior framing to secure cargo: One of the wheel hubs: Carrying lugs that connect the Dobbas to the carrying frame: Floor board: The last bag contains more tubular structural elements. Again in yellow resin and immediately you can see one warped rod. My advice is too replace simple straight rods with Evergreen rod. Floor framing: The photo etch sheets are impressive. Daunting almost. The forward section of the Dobbas can be found here and needs to be carefully curved. One thing to mind here is that there is one panel in this section that should be opened up to accommodate the barrel of a gun the Dobbas could carry. It’s the small, rectangular panel in part #1. The pro of using PE to make the outer panels is that you can pose this Dobbas all opened up alongside the plane, without the thickness of resin interfering. Many of the smaller parts go in the inside of the Dobbas, so won’t be visible when it’s all closed up. Another reason to pose it with some open panels and maybe some cargo inside… The decals: The instructions are as always simple but effective: The finished article (from the Profimodeller website): Carrying frame: Verdict Another exotic subject covered by the capable hands of Profimodeller. Super complete and rich in multi-media detail. If you’re looking for something interesting to add to your Ju-88 kit (or He111, Bf110, Ju87) this could be it. As said: the only small nitt picking I can think of is that the small panel in the forward section of the Dobbas is not supplied separately. On the positive side: the fact that it isn’t makes it easier to curve this part more fluently. My sincere thanks to Profimodeller for providing the review sample. Kind regards, Jeroen Peters
  5. 1:32 Ju-88 Spy Profimodeller Catalogue # 32217 Available from Profimodeller for € 73,50 Introduction I can hear you think: ‘A Spy plane??’. Well ofcourse we mean the recon variant of the Ju-88. The Ju-88 was the logical choice in search for a successor of the Do-17 reconnaissance variant. It was fast, could fly at high altitudes and was able to carry quite some load. A versatile, stable platform. A series of trials were performed with the A-variant (A-1’s and A-5’s), which came into service in 1940, just in time to be pushed into service for the Battle of Britain. These early A-trials carried three camera’s in the rear bomb bay. The dive brakes and WTC bomb racks were removed (not needed for recon missions!) and an extra hand operated camera was installed in the nose, in the former bombardier’s position. This all lead up to a standardized set-up of three camera’s, positioned behind the rear bomb-bay (so that bomb carrying capability was not compromised) and neither were the fuselage fuel tanks (so not to compromise range). This was the D-variant. From this D-variant a whole range of dedicated recon versions were born (D-0 to D-5). The real deal, with the external fuel tanks loaded and camera ports visible: Make sure you pick your scheme and corresponding D-variant (or A) wisely and check where your camera’s are properly positioned, what engines you need (Jumo or BMW), etc, etc… This set offers an impressive range of schemes to choose from, but more on that later. The set Profimodeller packs their kits and sets in sturdy tight fitting boxes. Upon lifting the box top a neat array of golden smaller boxes, decals, photo etch and booklets greet you. The golden boxes are also a common with Profimodeller and ensure the resin inside doesn’t shift around the box during transport. The two long range external tanks are solid resin and are the only resin parts not packed inside the two golden boxes, due to their sheer size. So let’s look at these giant chunks of resin first. They are actually the same as set: P32215. So if you only need the external fuel tanks for the Ju-88, you might want to grab this set. The fuel tanks themselves feature a small step in the resin due to shifting of the mould. You will need some filler and sanding paper to get the front of the tanks smooth. No biggie. Another tip: these tanks are heavy! So you might want to drill some holes in them and add some metal rod to reinforce the attachment to the plane. When we open the golden boxes, an overwhelming amount of yellow and black resin comes out. The black resin is typical for Profimodeller, and to this day I’m not exactly sure what it is. It feels like plastic, but it cuts and sands like resin. I’m also not sure why certain parts are casted in it and others in standard yellow resin. It may have to do with the strength, but looking at some of the smaller parts in black, that doesn’t make sense. One bag carries the ETC racks. Four of them in total. Why four?? Because it takes two of these racks to carry one giant external fuel tank. That’s why! If you look at the construction sequence of the tanks, you see a lot of Photo etch clads the exterior, along with a extra carrying band that wraps it to the two ETC racks. STILL I urge you to drill a whole through the resin part that contains the fuel line and enters the wing, and stuff a metal rod right through it, into the tank. Just for extra measure. This part got harmed in transit. Easy fix though: The second bag contains the bulkhead, side walls of the camera compartment and outside of the hull with the three camera ports. The detail on the sidewalls is delicate and something you want to show off! The same goes for the rivets and other detail on the bulkhead. Superior stuff. One small piece of electronics in this bag however lost a small bit during transport. I found this inside the bag and is an easy fix. It shows that even these separate golden boxes, can’t protect the delicate resin from my parcel delivery man ‘Mohammed’… The camera mounting frame: The third bag gives us the black resin I was talking about. Just look at this second bulkhead. Great stuff… Also in this bag we find the camera housings, electronics and camera’s. All perfectly casted, without any flaws. The black strips with lightening holes are the top fuselage frames that will be visible from the bottom, IF you leave the camera doors open and place the model on a mirror. A wise way of displaying all this added detail! Another stunning spectacle are the sheets of photo etch. Daunting? Yes! But patience and persistence will guide you through. Two large sheets and one small. The small sheet holds parts for the external fuel tanks. The two large sheets contain the parts for detailing of the camera, insides of the camera-bay doors, reinforcement plates, hinges, etc… The instruction booklet is actually quite clear and compact, which could create the illusion that building this set is a breeze. I however would not recommend it to the novice modeler. Close up: Close up: The small sheet for the external fuel tanks: The Instructions: The schemes (12 in total!!): A• Junkers Ju-88D-5, 1.(F)/120, Norway, 1943 B• Junkers Ju-88D-1, 3.(F)/Aufkl.22, Dno, USSR, 1943 C• Junkers Ju-88D-1, T5+DL, 3.(F)/ObdL., Gosstkino, USSR, 1942 D• Junkers Ju-88D-2, 4T+GH, Westa 51, Nantes, France, 1944 E• Junkers Ju-88D-1, T5+GL, 3.(F)/AufkL. Gr. ObdL., Luga, USSR, 1942 F• Junkers Ju-88D-2, 7A+NH, 1.(F)/121, Sicily, Italy, 1942 G• Junkers Ju-88D-5, GM+CA, Luftbildstaffel 1, Derna, Lybia, 1942 H• Junkers Ju-88D-1, 7A+MH, 1.(F)/121, Fuka, Egypt, 1942 I• Junkers Ju-88D-1, 7A+GH, 1.(F)/121, Fuka, Egypt, 1942 J• Junkers Ju-88D-2, 4U+GK, 2.(F)/123, Siciliy, Italy, 1942 K• Junkers Ju-88D-2, 4U+EK, 2.(F)/123, Crete - Italy, 1942-43 L• Junkers Ju-88D-1, D7+LH, Westa 1./ObdL., Bad Zwischenahn, Germany, 1942 M• Junkers Ju-88A-1(F), 4U+DH, 1. Staffel, 1. Gruppe, Aufkl. Gr. 123, France (BoB) The decal sheets: Verdict When we look at the quality of the product, I would rate this set an 8. No air bubbles are found, only a few small steps in the surface, that can be fixed. The photo-etch is of the highest qualities around and the decals register and are well printed with no grain showing up in the colours. The amount of schemes to choose from, the top, bottom and side views of the schemes, clear instructions, make this set worth the money. The Ju-88 kit itself isn’t expensive at all, so you have no excuse to spend a little extra in order to create a bit more exotic version. ​As I've said before: these sets are no breeze. You need some serious skills to do the set right. But I know that with the proper amount of research, patience and persistence, you will have a unique stunner on your hands, that will attract all the camera's at the show (apart from the three that are in it's belly My sincere thanks to Profimodeller for providing the review sample. To buy this set directly, click here. Kind regards, Jeroen Peters
  6. Profimodeller He-111 MG FF Nose Installation P32293 & He-111 MG FF Front “C” Stand P32294 Nose installation available here for 16,64 dollars directly from Profimodeller “C” Stand installation available here for 16,64 dollars directly from Profimodeller In addition to the review below, you might want to check out the MG17 tail installation for the Revell He-111H kit too. Click here. With the much anticipated Revell He-111H6 kit in the wake of the P-1 a perfect fertile ground for After Market companies was created. Whilst the Ju-88 kit builds into a pretty decent model without any AM, the He-111 sure could use some more love. Just take a look at the horrid seat and machine guns. If you compare these parts to the Ju-88 kit, it really is a step back. The MG FF cannon in the Revell kit is pretty basic and offers a rudimentary MG FF shape. The Revell offering: The He-111 family shows a lot of small variations that can be difficult to discern. Small variations that focus mainly on armament. The sets described here let you make variations of the H-series, but I would strongly suggest checking reference of the version you plan to build, as I have learned black isn’t always black and white isn’t always white. The MG FF The Aero Detail book tells us this set up was used in the He-111H-10 to H-16 versions, but it was actually introduced first on the H6 version. See photo below of an H6 with nose armed MG FF. I have seen versions of this with and without the external V41 sight, so again: check your references. Nose MG FF (note: no leather mantlet): Note: Gun sight which is not included in the set: Nice dio idea?: If you do want to include the sight, you may want to scourge the alignment pin and gun sight from a spare Master Barrels set: The low-down: A cool photo from inside the nose: Where the “C” stand MG FF installation intended for ground attack roles, this nose firing MG FF 20 mm cannon was used for defensive purposes. It was (like the MG 15) aimed by hand. This goes for both the nose firing MG FF and the “C” stand installation. The gunner had two joystick-like grips, both containing a fire button on top. The nose version was fed by a drum (4 are included in the set) whereas the “C” stand was fed by a vertical linear magazine. Typically the drum would contain 60 rounds. With a firing rate of 520 shots per minute this would empty quick! On the other hand: when a target was hit by one of it’s high explosive rounds, one hit could be all it took. The nose MG FF set What we get is the typical sturdy white cardboard box we are accustomed to by Profimodeller. Inside we find a lovely golden box containing a single sheet of photo etch, instructions and a mix of yellow and black resin castings. The first thing that strikes is that this isn’t your Quickboost drop-in resin, but rather a small model in itself that calls for skills and good eyesight. 22 parts make up the gun. I’ve written it in previous Profimodeller reviews, but the black resin is something else. It’s much stronger than normal yellow resin and I wonder what makes Profimodeller decide to do the drums in standard resin and other parts in black. It’s definitely easy to work with and you don’t have to be super cautious not to break it while handling. Construction is pretty straightforward and with the black resin not much cleaning up is needed. All you need to do is cut the pieces off the block. Also no modification of Revell parts is needed. 2 PE frames need to be glued to the Revell clear dome. One inside. One outside. After this the whole resin MG FF slides through. I also like the way the rubber/leather mantlet and spent ammo chute is depicted. Very realistic. With the high visibility of this part inside the glass greenhouse this set adds a lot in my opinion. Nose MG FF instructions: Excellent ammo drum: The MG FF “C” stand This set has a few similar parts as the nose version. The barrel (which is nicely thin and hollow), the gun breech and body and the external sight for instance. The gun differs in that it has a stock for the gunners chest and a different ammo feed. The magzines are pretty delicate and done in both yellow (loaded) and black (empty version) resin. The latter showing a very delicate extended carrying handle. Even the 20 mm ammo can be seen inside. For these magazines a photo etch storage rack for 14 magazines is provided. The 2 photo etch frets also include a leather matrass for the gunner, window frame and gunsights. Again: the spent ammo chute is done very nicely with convincing creases. The only shame is that this version of the MG FF will be much less visible once installed! Loaded magazine (2x): Empty magazine: The frame holding the grips (below): Bag with grips and smaller parts: PE fret 1 with magazine storage: PE fret 2 with gun sights and leather matress: Verdict IF you are building the Revell He-111H6 (or other variant with the nose MG FF installed) you really should get the Nose MG FF. Such a large kit deserves it instead of the toy like contraption by Revell. Profimodeller requires some research (since no variants are named in the instructions or on the box, nor are there reference photo’s included) but also skills and a good eye. The material these sets are made from is detailed and strong. But the thing I love most is the attention to detail. When studying reference materials I can’t find any omissions. Except for one strange detail: For some reason Profimodeller decided to not include the round gunsight ring for the Nose version, which is present on many of the reference photo’s I have found. And when the gunsight ring isn’t present, usually the mounting frame for it isn’t either. The “C” stand version does include the gunsight rings. My advise: leave the whole sight off as depicted on the cover of the Aero Detail book J To sum it all up: 15 euro’s buys you a whole lot of visible detail. A special thanks to Profimodeller for the review samples. To order directly from Profimodeller, click here. Kind regards, Jeroen Peters
  7. 1:32 Transport Trolley for Fieseler FI-103 (V1) Profimodeller Catalogue # 32280 Available from Profimodeller for $36,60 Introduction Recently I reviewed the full V1 kit by Profimodeller. A sweet, well researched multimedia (resin and photo-etc) kit for the price of 55 euros. Today I’m taking a look at the complimentary trolley. Profimodeller calls it a transport trolley on the box and in a sense it is, but the more appropriate name is loading trolley. The germans called it ‘Zubringerwagen’, which means something along those lines. It was quite a challenge to find good reference on this trolley, because not a lot are left (or maybe none at all!). The Transport or Loading trolley was a two-stage construction that transports the V1 to the launching site and then delivers the V1 to the launching ramp via the smaller upper cart that sits as a leech on the trolley. See the two schematic drawings below for clarification (somewhat And here are some photo's of the real thing: I’ve found a scan of the V1 instruction manual which has one chapter dedicated to the transport and loading of the V1. The drawings of these steps are shown here. The quality of the scan is a bit shady, but it gives an idea of the complicated details the upper cart had. This lead me to a 3D model on Shapeways in 1/16th scale that is actually quite nicely done. It does appear to be s lightly different version of the trolley than the Profimodeller one, since the Profimodeller version does not feature the loading winches and the push beams for the ground crew. The 3D version on Shapeways: As I’ve found several photo’s showing differences in almost every single one of them, it seems as if there was no definite standard, OR changes were made so fast for improvement that it’s hard to say what’s right or wrong. We’ve seen Tamiya offer one of these in simplified shape in 48th scale (see photo below). And we’ve seen a transport cart (that looks like the upper part of the transport trolley) done by Bronco in 35th scale. But if you look at the photo references I’ve been able to find, you’ll see that the construction is actually quite intricate. Springs, couplings and cross bracings. Much like the towing cart Profimodeller also offers. A review of that super detailed and model engineering marvel can be found here (scroll down). The very much simplified Tamiya version: The kit The materials Profimodeller uses for their sets are not always the most obvious and can certainly surprise. As does this kit. When opening the box three bags show different materials. One bag of your standard yellow resin. One bag filled with metal springs. And one bag filled with some sort of black resin that I have only seen in their arsenal. It’s a stiff, crisp and shape steady material that is often used by Profimodeller for important parts that need to carry a bit of weight. The parts that are cast in this material are the main frames, main wheels, several cross beams and hand holds for the ground crew. Another smaller bag inside the bag with black resin, holds a handful of small eye-lets from the same material. It’s difficult to guess what their use is. To tie down tarps? To attach extra pulling ropes? Lord knows. Black resin (?): Main frame: One of the main wheels: Wheels of the small cart: The yellow resin provides the U-shaped beams (which are all straight thank god), the body for the smaller cart, winch installations, parts for the chassis and the two long pulling handles on either side of the trolley. Yellow resin: The body of the small cart: One of the 18 U-beams: Pulling bar: The metal springs that are in bag #3 can be seen in the drawing and are pushed down by the upper loading cart. When we take a look at the instructions, it becomes clear the this kit calls for: • a clean bench! • a steady hand • a ruler • and patience The instructions: We start with the main body which looks pretty straightforward. At step 2 the instructions call for cutting the U-beams to length. At step 4 the instructions show the jig that holds the main wheels being connected to the main body. Looking at the engineering I would recommend a strong 2 component glue that doesn’t have the risk of becoming brittle like many super-glues. The same goes for the 4 guiding beams on which the ground crew handling holds are connected. These can be pretty fragile if the wrong choice of glue is used. All in all it looks like the build can be pretty straightforward if care is taken and alignment is properly measured. Verdict This set is what the lovely V1 kit deserves. Lots of detail and the first well researched transport trolley on the market in any scale. It will make the otherwise blunt V1 with not a lot of visual interest sit proud on it’s base. Very much recommended and a necessity if you already have the V1 kit. Keep an eye out for my imminent build of this kit. My sincere thanks to Profimodeller for providing the review sample. To buy your trolley, click here. Kind regards, Jeroen Peters
  8. 1:32 Fieseler FI-103 (V1) Profimodeller Catalogue # 32279 Available from Profimodeller for € 55,- First some history The V1 (or Vergeltungswaffen 1 > Retribution weapon 1) was the first ever unmanned jetplane that flew. It’s nicked Buzz-bomb because of the buzzing sound the pulse jet engine made. The official name however is Fi-103 as it was built by the Fieseler factory. Yes, the same factory that built the Fieseler 156 Storch! Another, less known name for the V1 was FZG-76. Meaning Flakzielgerät 76 and hinting at use as an anti aircraft missile. This was the official program name and used to mislead allied intelligence. Other nicknames used by the germans were Krähe (crow) and Maikäfer (May bug) on Hitler’s orders. The latter alike to yet another nickname used by the allies: Doodlebug, after the distinctive popping sound the engine made. The V1 was powered by the As014 Argus Pulsejet and drank 75 Octane gasoline. The starting procedure was quite the ritual and involved electric starters, airhoses and a powered ramp with a steam powered piston. The V1 reached a speed of 580 km per hour as it left the ramp! The V1 called for high speeds as the V1 was prone to stalling due to the small wings. Cruising speed was about 640 km per hour (400mph) and the reach was about 250 km. A relative small distance, which required take-off from Holland, Belgium and France in order to reach Great Britain. Remains of these take-off ramps can still be found in these countries. The ramp actually fired a plunger with a hook that pulled the V1. This plunger would land a considerable distance further in the fields. Take-off was also done from the wing of a bomber. A risky procedure where 77 bombers were lost during the launch procedure, take-off or mission. Here's a look at a V1 mounted on a ramp in France: And here's a look at the plunger that pushed the V1 along the ramp: You can see the tube the plunger travelled through and the opening on the top for the hook on the plunger: The culprits... So, the V1 is not a rocket (as it is sometimes called) but rather a plane, since it has wings and a jet engine propulsion (and not a rocket). This would make an interesting model. The He111 with a V1 slung under it's wing: At the peak of it’s use more than 100 V-1’s were fired at England, with a total of almost 16.000 produced of which 2400 ‘landed’ on London (fired from France) and 2400 hit Antwerp (fired from Holland). The rest didn’t make it to their launch. No wonder that many V-1’s survived and found their way to museums worldwide. Some completely original, some part replica and some restored from collected parts. The 2 spherical pressure tanks, wound by pianowire. The small propellor at the tip of the nose that measured the travelled distance. The fuel injection frame at the front of the pulse jet. All very recognizable parts when looking at dug up remains of a V1. The V1 in 1/32 The V1 is a subject that somehow eluded the 1/32 modelling scene through the years. Yes we have the 1/35 Bronco offering (which is not very detailed nor accurate) but that’s about it! If you want to mate the V1 with the wing of a He-111 or combine it with another 1/32 subject the scale difference between 1/35 and 1/32 will become evident. Having built the 1/32 HPH Reichenberg (basically manned V1) and both the 1/35 Bronco Reichenberg I was shocked to see how much these differed in size. Talking of the HPH Reichenberg and looking at the first photo’s I saw of this kit, I suspected most parts to be a copy (or perhaps shared moulds) from the HPH offering. Having inspected the resin parts at hand, I can tell you that they are not. Timeline-wise it’s interesting that Profimodeller first released two different transport trolley’s for the V1 before they released the V1 itself. Two very comprehensive and well researched kits with insane detail: • The transport trolley (kit P32280) • The V1 Anhänger (kit P32247) >> Review here (scroll down). This kit is in fact one of the first real standalone kits Profimodeller releases. If you don’t count the above carts… it actually is, so it is interesting to look at the whole package in this review: Decals, part break down, engineering, schemes and instructions. The Model So let’s take a closer look at this very first kit Profimodeller produces! A rather small box opening at the top, containing three bags. Two with resin parts (big > fuselage and wings) and small (engine, rudder, nose cone, etc..) and one bag with the decals and photoetch. The first thing I looked at was the surface structure on the wings and fuselage. Pretty delicate rivets and fine panel lines is what you find. Also the overlapping panels and fuselage strengtheners are well done. When you look at the inside of the fuselage you’ll find locating holes for small rods that serve as locating pins. Same technique you’ll find on HPH and Silverwings kits. The most challenging bit is trying to mate the fuselage halves, removing the seam and restoring small rivets and panel lines that you will loose when sanding. A dry-fit tells me that this will be minimal with this kit. The forward fuselage is moulded separately. Perhaps to avoid the risk of warping or breaking, or just to make them easier to cast. The lip that is made along the vertical seam will help you to make a strong joint. Fuselage parts and wings: Just like the real thing, the fuselage has two holes in the sides to accommodate the tubular beam that supports the wings. The beam is included, but I would suggest to replace this with proper brass tube! Much stronger. And when posing the V1 with the wings off (like I will) a brass tube will look more convincing too. The wings differ from the Reichenberg wings in the sense that the V1 was steered by a gyroscopic device from the tail planes and rudder. The Reichenberg also had ailerons on the main wings. Nosecone: Tail: Engine: The smaller resin details contain the engine that are cast almost solid. HPH offers a 2 piece resin front of the engine (intake and body) and metal tube for the rear. I added my own weld line along this metal tube (since this is a prominent feature on the V1 engine). Profimodeller takes a different route and offers the engine in 3 resin parts with cast on weld line. Pretty slick. Other parts cover the tail which is very nicely done with almost all the details. The only thing I’m missing is a small inspection hole in the tailpiece that shows the rudder control mechanism. As on the HPH kit, I will add this detail myself. The photoetch is nicely done and contains the rudder control, fuselage strengtheners, the Argus fuel injection frame and an extra cool feature that I will definitely include: a transport nose protector that protected the small nose propeller during transport. What’s also included are the details on the wingroots that will be visible in transport configuration. Another detail I had to scratch on my HPH Reichenberg. Another great detail this kit captures nicely is the inside of the intake. The intake starts round and then goes to a square shape further in. I love this attention for the real thing. The schemes 6 of them. And as I mentioned before… diverse! The only thing I’m missing is background information on the different schemes. Especially when doing a diorama it would be important to know what scheme suits what situation. I guess you’ll have to do your own homework here! The scheme with the blue broad band around the fuselage kind of speaks to me, and I’ll try to figure out where and when it was used. Part of the fun I guess. The decals are actually all stenciling for the ground crew as no unit badges or crosses were applied on the V1. Verdict Dare I compare this kit to the HPH Ohka and Reichenberg? Yes! Since they are the only game in town to compare this kit to! We all know HPH has raised the bar when it comes to resin kits with smart engineering and superb detail. Well… It looks like we have another company that wants to play along. This kit is complete. Well engineered (just look at the fuselage break down), well researched and nicely cast. The casting blocks and flash are easy to remove. The schemes that are included are diverse and many. What else can you wish for? A solid 9 out of 10. Keep an eye out for my imminent build of this kit, together with it’s transport trolley. My sincere thanks to Profimodeller for providing the review sample. Get your copy right here. Kind regards, Jeroen Peters
  9. Profimodeller Bf110 External Fuel Tank Sn# 32271 Available here for 18,49 euro’s directly from Profimodeller What we have here is a set that will definitely give your Bf 110 some range! To be precise: This set should give your Bf110D some range. And that would be the Dragon Wingtech kit, review here. The Bf-110D Zerstörer version had a few different ways to carry additional fuel. The least loved version by pilots and crew-members was the Dackelbauch version, which carried a large lumb under it’s nose/belly that was not detachable. This had a large negative influence to the flight characteristics, speed and added dangers to emergency landings… The Bf110D1/R1 carried one of these bellies, but also had the capability to carry an additional 2 x 900L wing droptanks (as featured in this review). This kit is also offered by Dragon. The Bf110D1/R2 carried an 85L droptank under it’s fuselage and the additional 900L tanks under it’s wings (like the D1/R1). The Bf110D4 Recon version had it’s teeth (MGFF’s) removed and a camera installed. It had the capability to carry either 300L or 900L droptanks under it’s wings. The set What we get is the typical sturdy white cardboard box we are accustomed to by Profimodeller. Inside we find a single sheet of photo etch, instructions and 6 resin castings. All in yellow resin. Hardly any flash or cleanup necessary. The 900L droptanks are huge and heavy, so you might want to contemplate additional strengthening when attaching these to the wings. To be honest: what I would do is replace the resin fuel lines with bended copper rods. I would drill a hole in the resin, through the PE plate that covers the wing and the wing itself. That should do the trick! Big chunks! The vertical fins are done in resin, and scale thickness wise I believe this to be more precise. PE could well be too thin. They should fit the body perfectly after sanding the droptank tail a bit. The photo-etch adds great detail to the fuel ports and hatches on the droptank. This isn’t your: let me slap a Quickboost resin upgrade against my model, but rather a model in itself. Just look at all the PE parts that cover these parts! Careful alignment, measuring the holes that need to be made in the underside of the wing and checking reference to see if your version carried these is needed beforehand. The instructions: Verdict Dragon offers a series of nice Bf110’s. Yes, they need some TLC and can be a bit of a let down in terms of fit and detail, but they are here and need to be built! This set lets you extend your Luftwaffe collection with some cool Zerstörer / Recon schemes and you don’t need to have a great deal of experience with resin to do so. It’s well researched, accurate and detailed. The casting is clean and needs minimal clean-up. The only thing I’d love to have seen on the box-top is a listing of types that carried these. I think it would be good marketing to add the types to the box or product description (on the site). A special thanks to Profimodeller for the review sample. To order directly from Profimodeller, click here. Kind regards, Jeroen Peters
  10. Profimodeller He-111 Rear Wheel bay & Rear turret Sn# 32270 Available here directly from Profimodeller The Revell He-111P-1 kit was soon followed by the much more popular H-6 kit. With the P1 version offering a far smaller scope for versions and theatres and DB601 power plants that defined the shape of the engine nacelles to and extend that later versions would need a massive conversion, the H-6 kit was welcomed with open arms by modellers. An impressive and ever growing list of upgrades is available today, with Eduard and CMK in the lead. With a subject that is huge and can be quite un-interesting to the eye in terms of detail on the surface, opening up some panels here and there prove useful. Eduard released a full set of PE showing the internal bomb-bay, but that will only be properly visible if you place the model on a mirror. The cockpit detail can be upgraded to the max, but once this is closed up, you need pretty good eyes to enjoy it. The same goes for the wheelbays… So, what can we open up? The whole enchilada! With HPH internal details, covering the entire fuselage. But this means leaving the whole thing open, missing wings etc… Review here: http://www.scaleplasticandrail.com/kaboom/index.php/all-things-aviation/132-135-scale/132-aftermarket-items/1973-1-32-heinkel-he-111p-cutaway-kit-from-hph CMK brings us the wing fuel tanks, but again, these are only visible from the underside. If you want to add some drama to your He-111 I suggest you get the CMK fuel filler necks and Life Raft set. This is located in the fuselage spine and will be very visible. And if you’re going for a later H-version of the He-111 (H-3 and upwards) I suggest you get this little gem I’m reviewing here as well. Here’s why.. Some (not all) later model He-111H’s were equipped with an extra sting in the tail. An MG17 could be installed behind the tailwheel and was fired by one of the crew-members situated halfway or in front of the aircraft. I have not been able to figure out who actually pulled the trigger on this extra gun, but I can imagine it was the top turret gunner, since he would look to the rear, from a good position. It also have been fired by the gunner from the gondala, but I just can’t find a source that confirms my suspicions. The photo of the tail gun with panels off, as used on the packaging of this set: Here's another shot. This one is from the Squadron book: And another one. Slightly different: The AeroDetail book I have states that the extra tail gun was installed on the H-3 up to H-16 versions, but I’ve seen many H-3 examples without the gun. Another thing I noticed, is that the gun IS present on the HPH internal detail kit, which in fact is an earlier P-version. I did find two photographs of two different crashed He-111P’s (during the Battle of Britain, 1940) that both have the tail gun, installed to fire in a downward angle in one, and rear firing angle in the other. The AeroDetail book shows a drawing of the tail gun firing straight back, with an additional drawing of the gun firing in this downward angle (as in the photograph). The way the text is written in the AeroDetail book I can’t make up whether they mean 2 MG17’s in the tail or just one, but with two different angle options. So be sure to check your references. I will however install this baby in my He-111P. A photo of a crashed He-111P with tail sting: Here's a look at the AeroDetail book drawing, showing the two stances: There are sources that claim the gun wasn’t there to effectively shoot down enemy fighters, but more as a repellent. A way to keep enemy fighters at bay. Perhaps this is the reason you don’t see a whole lot of this set-up being used. The upgrade What we get is the typical sturdy white cardboard box we are accustomed to by Profimodeller. Inside we find a single sheet of photo etch, instructions and a smaller box, containing the resin parts, Master MG17 brass barrel and cooling jacket. The rear bulkhead is done in conventional yellow resin, but all the other parts are done in a stronger, black kind of resin. I can imagine this was done to add strength. Bare in mind that these parts are connected to the tail wheel installation, which carrier the entire rear weight of the model. The photo etch sheet has the panel framing with fastener eye-lets and the tailwheel bay interior with delicate stringers. I managed to find an original Heinkel drawing in my Ersatzteilliste book (Thnx Cees!) which show all the parts offered in this upgrade. Here's the drawing from the Ersatzteilliste book (albeit without the gun): The instructions are clear and tell you to bend and use the two panels as a template to mark where to cut the Revell plastic. I’d suggest to thin the plastic at the edges too in order the achieve proper scale thickness. At first I thought it strange that no stringer detail was offered for the tailcone, but looking at the drawings in my library, I can see that the tail cone is just that. A non-reinforced cone that was placed over the gun mounting frame. So the only thing you need to do is to thin out the edges. Especially when displaying the tail with the panels next to it, as in the box top photo. Bulkheads: Gun mounting frame: MG17: All in all this conversion / upgrade will take a good look at your references. First to check whether the version you’re building had this set-up, and secondly to see how it looked. For example: if you look at the photo’s, you’ll see the panels overlapped the cone, meaning there was no paint on the overlapping parts. ​The photo etc sheet: Master brass: The instructions: A look at the original Revell part, in need of some TLC: Verdict As said in the introduction, I myself welcome any upgrade for the He-111 making it more interesting to look at. This here is a well researched, complete and good executed upgrade / conversion that does just that. The He-111’s size doesn’t allow a lot of modellers to build a whole range of them, so when you’re having a crack at it, you might as well go to town on it. I know I am! With the detail of the He-111 being somewhat of a disappointment (over the previous Ju88 kit) the tail gun could sire use a little love. Of course you could fix that with just the Master barrels brass gun, but then you’ll miss out on the opportunity I prompted earlier: opening up some panels! A special thanks to Profimodeller for the review sample. To order directly from Profimodeller, click here. Kind regards, Jeroen Peters
  11. Here's my entry to the build. Its the same one I was going to do for the Junkers GB but ran out of time. Revells 88A-1 AM bits for it New AM bits just added! CMK exterior set (I want to show the dinghy to break up the black) Profimodeller's ladder and pitot Revells boxing of the ICM kit (same model half the price!) Vulcans Motorcycle and sidecar And finally Tanks figure which is pretty close to the pose in the pics! I started last weekend and will post up the progress pics where I'm up to later on Aaron
  12. 1:32 MiG-15 Engine (for HpH release) Profimodeller Catalogue # 32119 Available from Profimodeller for 1590,00 CZK I have to say, I adore the very early jet aircraft. This was of course a technology which was still frighteningly new when the MiG-15 first took to the skies in 1947. Only two years earlier, the Messerschmitt Me 262 was still in operational use, being the world's first mass-produced jet fighter to enter front-line service. With the collapse of the Third Reich, Russia trialled much German technology, and only had limited success with their reverse engineering of both the Jumo 004 and BMW 003 jet engines. For their next generation of fighters, the Russians opted to buy the British Rolls Royce Nene power-plant, and reverse engineer this for their own purposes. To say the Russians were amazed that such technology was so easily purchased from the British Labour government, is a severe understatement. After purchasing the engines, Russian engine designer, Vladimir Klimov set to work and designed/developed the Klimov RD-45. A later attempt by Rolls Royce to rightfully claim a licence fee, ultimately failed. Klimov RD-45/VK-1 The Klimov RD-45 turbojet was quickly developed and first run in 1947, and the MiG-15 was specifically designed to operate with this new engine. Of course, the rest is history. The MiG-15 was a highly successful aircraft that was introduced into service in 1949, and set a further developmental path for the Russians. We'll look at this aircraft in more detail when we have the HpH kit here for you. There's nothing like doing something arse about face. My original intention was to have the review of the HpH MiG-15 kit online before I published this one, but sometimes, things are a little out of my control. I will endeavour to have the MiG-15 kit itself reviewed here, very early next year, followed by an online build of both items together. Until then, you'll have to satisfy yourself with this rather impressive engine upgrade said for the aforementioned kit. I'm sure you won't be disappointed. If you want to display with your HpH kit, you really are going to have to perform the most radical and destructive surgery possible, to two of the kit's main parts; namely the fuselage. The Klimov engine was bolted to a framework that was supported on a bulkhead in the middle of the MiG-15 fuselage. To access the engine, the rear fuselage was unbolted, and wheeled away on a trolley. So, in short, you're going to have to saw that fuselage in half, along pre-prescribed panel lines. If that fills you with trepidation, then rightfully so! Luckily though, this set provides a whole new rear section in resin, based upon the HpH kit itself. Therefore, the surface detail etc is identical. Having these new sections means that you don't have to re-use the old rear section and make any precision cuts to do so. You can saw the fuselage to the rear of the line, and then gradually work to that line and finish it properly. Those fuselage halves are superb. Cast in pale cream resin, surface detail is precise and sharp, with neat rivets and panel lines. It also has numerous service panels which are cast 'open', allowing you to choose how you will set the access doors themselves. Internally, there is no detail, but you will add the numerous metal construction elements from detailed PE strip, and you will also fit the PE airbrake housings (supplied in this kit too) into this area, along with the exhaust pipe tunnel. Even this can be accessed by a panel which you can pose. Whetted your appetite yet? Casting blocks are connected along the fuselage mating joint, and will need careful removal. Several openings also have a thin resin web that will need to be removed. There are another TWO bags of finely cast, cream resin, containing the various engine parts, and also those for other areas, such as the tail pipe and rear, external nozzle fairing. This is quite an impressive and imposing resin upgrade, with a total of almost FORTY parts, and that's not including the numerous sheets of PE which you'll need to negotiate. Using my Rolls Royce Nene reference, accompanied with images of the Klimov RD-45, it's very obvious that Profimodeller have created what amounts to an extremely accurate-looking reproduction. All of the parts which you would expect to see here, are included, and the breakdown of the engine means that no simple compromise has been made. If it's better to use 2 or 3 parts to recreate something, instead of one, then this set clearly demonstrates this. You can more or less pick out the various engine areas and identify them against period illustration. The engine comprises of nine combustion chambers (all separate parts and with their own PE section flanges), centre around various assemblies, including rear air intake and main compressor housing. Nozzle box and numerous other parts are beautifully recreated here, including the engine's ancillary control unit etc. When complete, the engine will look both comprehensive and very complicated. Numerous sections and several PE parts go together to create the exhaust pipe which attaches to the engine outlet, and will slide into the rear fuselage section tunnel. At least I'm presuming that these halves will more or less go together. If they don't, I wouldn't have issue with that, as this engine is supposed to be displayed. That's the whole point. Profimodeller have spared no expense in recreating this area in the best detail possible. Another bag of resin parts contains more ancillary parts, and the engine mounting framework. All resin has some clean-up which is needed, whether this is light flash, or the thoughtfully placed casting blocks. Detail is sharp throughout, and no flaws have been visible to this reviewer's eye. Several items such as the tubular sections for the exhaust, are thinly cast. You're going to have to like photo-etch if you wish to use this set. And I mean, really like it. There are no less than SEVEN photo-etch sheets here, containing everything from internal structural detail, to engine detail, exhaust pipe tunnel, access doors, bulkheads, and also both the internal and external airbrake assemblies. Etched relief detail is excellent, and all parts have minimal tags holding them to the frets. You may need to anneal some parts before use. Lastly, several short lengths of copper wire, and one length of neoprene tubing are included. The wire is quite thick, and I'm a little unsure where these items fit, but wire is required for shackling the access ports to the rear fuselage. For this, however, I imagine it should be thinner. I find the instructions for this set to be pretty clear, despite being of the drawing type. I have said, this is no weekend project, and the manual pretty much highlights this. Colour references are given throughout, but no actual manufacturer paint codes. The last page is given over to the various access plate construction, and where they fit on the rear fuselage. This is certainly an upgrade which offers many options for the builder. Conclusion It's fair to say that this isn't a cheap upgrade, but in all fairness, for what you get, it is very well priced; a full engine and internal rear detail suite, plus half of the fuselage, and all that photo etch. I think thank once you get your head around the mass of PE, this set should build up pretty easily. Hacking the kit fuse in half will always be a nervy part of the build, but this is one upgrade which will surely set your MiG-15 above anything else out there. Absolutely superb! Very highly recommended My sincere thanks to Profimodeller for this review sample. To purchase directly, click THIS link.
  13. 1:32 Messerschmitt Me 163 Anhänger Profimodeller Catalogue # 32248 Available from Profimodeller for 1,749Kč We recently took a look at the new Scheuch-Schlepper and Pressluftballonhänger from Profimodeller. Read the historical noted there for an insight into the release of this new set. The balloon cradle lifter, whilst I talked about this in conjunction with the Me 163B, was possibly more akin to the recovery of the earlier Me 163A, although possibly not exclusively. However, it is certain that the tracked recovery cradle was the type that was generally in use for the later service Komet aircraft. We’ve seen this in both 1:72 and 1:48 scales before, but this is the first time this has been released in 1:32, and suitable for the Meng and Hasegawa Komet kits. Of course, this was towed by the Scheuch Schlepper, and you really should look at both of these kits for your Komet diorama. This release is packed into a sturdy little corrugated box that has an attractive product label attached to the lid, depicting a clear line drawing of the Anhänger. Inside this box, there are two smaller boxes containing the resin parts and another that contains the photo-etch, and wire etc. No other loose parts are contained in the rest of the main box expanse. In total, there are around 118 resin parts that are cast in a combination of black and cream resin. There are also no shortage of metal parts, with a further thirty turned brass parts, plus wire, metal rod and TWO photo-etch frets. I think you can see that this is no weekend project! Instructions are supplied as a 14-page A6 booklet. First of all, let’s see what we have in each box, then a look at construction. Each of the resin boxes has a single bag, containing all the parts therein. Careful handling is a necessity, and in my sample, there don’t appear to be any broken parts. Contents Box 1 Contents Box 2 Contents Box 3 The breakdown of this is quite different from the Pressluftballonhänger in that each arm of the lifting cradle is constructed from a number of smaller components instead of being a single large casting. Of course, this means that you have a number of elements that need to be assembled so that they lie correctly, without any twist. Looking through this kit, I would advise either small quantities of epoxy or CA gel for adhesive, allowing some adjustment time. I would also advise that both left and right booms are assembled at the same time, and one at a time, per side, whilst ensuring both sides are balanced. Remember, there are tracked wheels on this, and they really should lie ‘on the flat’. Get it wrong, and these won’t lie equally flat. Construction starts with the bank of two hydraulic rams that I presume are for raising the rear arms of the lifting boom. As I have no reference of the Anhänger, I have to try to understand the mechanics of it. The Anhänger is quite unusual in that these boom extremities have their own articulation. I presume this is so that each can be raised in turn until the Komet is safely off the floor. If the ground is uneven, it could be another reason for needing to raise each arm at different levels. The body of the Anhänger is next to be built, and again, there is a lot of importance that I need to push here for ensuring that alignment is correct. A number of subassemblies are required to fit between the two main frame halves, including a complicated jack/ram system that is used to raise the whole main, rear boom. There is, of course, a third hydraulic cylinder, standing vertically, which would have been used to move this section. As a number of holes are required for line up, I would perhaps use some styrene/ABS rod to aid in this, whilst waiting for other sections to dry. I think it’s important to look a couple of stages ahead during all construction. Each beam has 3 x 3 sets of wheels, made from resin, and mounted upon turned brass axles/spigots. As this is probably one of the most important areas of construction, I’m pleased to see that metal parts are used instead of resin. To encompass these, TWENTY-SIX resin blocks are included, each with two resin track parts. Both parts are different as only alternative tracks are fitted with a running guide that slips in between the outer/inner wheels and the centre wheel. I’m afraid you will need to drill these out so that you can insert a wire link to hold the tracks together. I would suggest that you actually link the tracks together and drill them at the same time whilst dry fitted, or you may find that you can’t accurately pin them together. Of course, these wheels are fitted to fixed beams, with the actual lifting beam sitting above this. Please look at the images of the instructions, just to see the level of detail on this kit. All resin parts are superbly cast, with very little clean-up, except for casting block removal. My sample has no flawed or broken parts. Of course, these is a lot of block removal due to the high parts count. Connection points are designed to be easy to remove, and production is some of the best I’ve seen, outside of the big name companies in our hobby. The metal parts are also excellent. PE frets are beautifully made, with sharp detail, and are left in their bare brass finish. Turned metal parts are perfect, with no burrs or other issues. Instructions These are clear and concise, but with many constructional stages due to the nature of the model. Unfortunately, there is no painting guide, so you’ll have to either ‘wing it’ or see what the general consensus of opinion is over this item. Conclusion Profimodeller have improved in leaps and bounds over the last couple of years, with some of the best detail and improvement sets available, outside of the regular companies, such as Eduard etc. The set is well designed and thought out, and beautifully produced. I can’t vouch for accuracy, simply because I don’t have the prerequisite reference material, and of course, this sort of review is quite difficult to put together, and remain informative. Everything you need to build this model, should be included here, such as wire for linking the tracks etc. A very comprehensive kit, albeit not too cheap, but in my opinion, well worth the asking price (currently at around £48 equivalent). Along with the Scheuch Schlepper, you can guarantee that the actual Komet part of your model, will actually only account for around a quarter of the total parts that you assemble!!! HIGHLY recommended Is that it? Er no! We have ANOTHER set here designed to be hooked up to the Scheuch. If you’re actually able to source a 1:32 V1 flying bomb, then we now have a trolley designed to carry them around the launching site....... 1:32 V1 Anhänger Profimodeller Catalogue # 32247 Available from Profimodeller for 1,749CZK This cradle-like trolley was used to carry the partially disassembled V1 ‘Doodlebug’ or ‘Buzzbombs’ from their storage facility, out to the waiting launch aircraft, such as the Heinkel He 111P. Essentially, this consisted of a transporter frame that had a hydraulic crane that allowed the weapon to be loaded and unloaded. Like a lot of specific German technology, it was quite innovative and fulfilled its purpose precisely. The wings of the V1 were packed alongside the fuselage, and once the fuselage was located to the Heinkel, the wings would then be fitted. Again, packed into a rigid cardboard box with a line drawing product label, this particular set contains THREE small boxes and another beautifully drawn instruction sheet. One package contains two PE sheets, with some wire, metal rod and the Anhänger wheels that are supplied as rubber rings. Another box has the more fragile rods and support parts cast in black resin which I think is perhaps a little more resistant to breakage than normal resin, and the last box holds a number of cream coloured resin parts for the frame, chassis, turntable etc. There are a total of around SEVENTY resin parts, SIX rubber tyres, THIRTY metal parts, including rod and turned metal items, and a further EIGHTY pieces of photo-etch. Again, this last figure is an approximation. Resin parts are superbly cast, with casting blocks that will be simple to remove and clean up any remnants. No breakage or flaw can be seen on my example. Photo-etch parts are also extremely good, with small connecting tabs and some great detail, such as the tread plates. Turned brass parts are also cleanly produced, sharp and with no burrs or debris to remove. Wire is included for the various hydraulic lines. Contents Box 1 Contents Box 2 Contents Box 3 This is no simple to make model though, and you’ll need to really take your time in ensuring that all beams and frames are aligned, and I would advise some slow-cure CA for those final connections. Instructions look easy enough to follow, with the line drawing illustration being pretty clear. There is NO colour information at all, so you’ll need to get creative but sensible with this little model kit. I know you’re going to ask about a 1:32 V1, yes? The good news is that Profimodeller will be releasing one of these in a few short weeks, so get ready for that super He 111/V1 combo/dio you always wanted to build in 1:32! HIGHLY recommended! …… but it’s not over yet. There’s more… 1:32 Tipping body for Scheuch Profimodeller Catalogue # 32249 Available from Profimodeller for 499,00CZK Please remember that the Scheuch wasn’t actually designed for the Me 163 Komet. It was only the towed items that were for this purpose. The Scheuch was actually an agricultural machine, and as such, it could tow other things. This set depicts a simple tipping trailer that could also have been military in use, for carrying tools, equipment and building materials etc. This little kit is a much simply affair than the Anhänger we just looked at, and as a result, comes in a smaller box that contains all parts that are simply packed into zip-lock wallets. One wallet contains the creamy coloured resin parts, whilst the other holds the black resin, photo etch and metal rods. A little unusual to see PE in a bag with resin, but this fret is a heavier gauge than we normally see, so will come to no harm. BAG 1 This contains the cream coloured resin, with a total of four parts. Two of these are the wheels. These actually look very good, with nice hub and tread detail. My only reservation is that the casting block connecting point is a little too wide, obscuring more of that tread than I would have liked to see. The other two parts are the main tipper body and the flap door side. These are very thin indeed and require some care in handling. Again, detailing is excellent, with metal frame and bolt detail, and the body itself having a faux wood grain pattern which should look good with an oil grain application and wash. The casting blocks have been thoughtfully placed, and will be easy to remove. BAG 2 Another ten resin parts reside here, cast in black resin. These form the tippers chassis, and will connect directly to the ring attachment at the rear of the Scheuch. Essentially, these parts are blocks and rods, and you’ll need to follow the instructions carefully with regard to spacings and lengths of parts. Construction looks easy, it’s just that you’ll need to take constant care before you commit glue. All casting is first rate, with no flaw or defect to be seen in my sample. A single PE fret contains brackets, shrouds, latches and hinge plates. Production is excellent. Metal rod is included for axles etc. Instructions are quite a simple affair with line drawing imagery. A little colour notation is supplied, but you can pretty much paint this how you see fit, whether it be grey, green, yellow etc. Conclusion Profimodeller’s Scheuch family is building nicely, and this little kit will no doubt will a hole for a good number of modellers. All it really needs now are some figures, but where can we get them? Highly recommended 1:32 Scheuch German crew Profimodeller Catalogue # 32258 Available from Profimodeller for 249,00CZK The last of our current Scheuch review items is definitely most welcome. It contains crew figures in various poses, that would look great being seen adjusting the Komet or Anhänger, and of course, sat driving the Scheuch too. This release, packed into a relatively large box, contains not one, two or three, but FOUR figures. They appear to be dressed in Luftwaffe ground crew uniforms, as their hats and tunics sport the Eagle symbol. These guys were collectively known as ‘Black Men’ due to their uniform colours, yet these uniforms are depicted in a Grey-Green tone. My history and knowledge here isn’t good, so I’m probably wrong. Each figure is cast without arms, and with the exception of the kneeling figure (mechanic), also without hats. The three hatless characters have peaked caps, unlike the kneeling figure. The latter figure can be posed so that he’s adjusting the Scheuch or the Komet, as his arms have hands that mimic the handling of either a tool or piece of equipment. One figure is supplied as a Scheuch driver, and he stares intently forward with his hands on the wheel. This is only really any good if you don’t use the other guys, as he appears to be driving. A seated figure, looking over his shoulder with one hand on the wheel, would’ve been more appropriate for this set, or an option to pose as such. Two ‘helpers’ are provided too. As these are fully stood up, they would perhaps be batter placed around the Komet. One of them looks like he has his hand, chest height, resting on something, but his right arm is resting along a flat surface. I’m sure there is a role for him, it’s just that you’ll need to find what that is. All figures are superbly cast, with minimal clean up and easy casting block removal. A little flash can be found here and there, but it’s very fine. Left arms are identifiable due to numbered dimples signifying fit and position. Uniform detail is very good, with creases, folds, belt detail etc. being nicely rendered. My only reservation, not being good at figure painting, is that the various emblems aren’t supplied as decals. You’ll need a steady hand to paint the various insignia, epaulets etc. The instructions consist of a single sheet that shows each figure as a complete character, and printed in colour. A small colour chart denotes painting. Conclusion I do have a couple of reservations here, but that is probably because I’m no figure builder and painter. Detail on these figures is very good, and no doubt will look perfect in the capable hands of a good modeller. I just wish there was a driver option for a stationary Scheuch. Recommended My sincere thanks to Profimodeller for the review samples seen here. To purchase these, click the links in the article.
  14. 1:32 Scheuch-Schlepper and Pressluftballonanhänger Profimodeller Catalogue # see article for code and price Available from Profimodeller When it came to creating a problem and then implementing a solution, the Germans certainly were very adept. Nazi Germany was certainly the first, and only country to actively employ a rocket-powered interceptor, in Messerschmitt’s Me 163 Komet design, despite just how dangerous this aircraft was to use (for its crews!). This aircraft no taxiing capability, and once spent of fuel and landed, it needed to be recovered and brought back to the airfield for refuelling and re-arming. This brought a number of challenges with it, but a simple piece of agricultural machinery was adapted to do that very job. The Scheuch-Schlepper was designed as a simple tractor, by Rudolf and Eugen Scheuch, and was adapted for war use as a bomb cart tractor. A second steering wheel was also fitted, allowing a walking crewman to help manoeuvre the Schlepper if it was operating under an aircraft. This versatile little machine was seized upon for a role in collecting the landed Me 163 aircraft, but of course, like any good piece of farm equipment, it needed a little help. A custom designed ‘Y’ framework was developed for the Schlepper to tow. This wide-mouthed frame carried inflation bags on each arm that supported the aircraft under its wings, for transport back to its base. A simple yet effective solution. Meng’s Me 163B Komet has been out a little while now, but if you wanted to display this in a recovery dio, there really weren’t any options for you, until now. Profimodeller has released not one, but TWO multimedia kits for this very purpose. The Scheuch-Schlepper and Pressluftballonanhänger are separate releases, but of course are really needed as a single entity for displaying with your Komet. You could of course show an un-hitched Pressluftballonanhänger being positioned under your Me 163, but it would only really make sense if the diminutive little tractor accompanied it. The two kits we have here are: 32245, Scheuch-Schlepper, 1,990 CZK 32246, Pressluftballonanhänger (for Scheuch-Schlepper), 1490 CZK Both of these releases are supplied in small and rigid corrugated cardboard boxes, with their own specific product label affixed to the lid. Scheuch-Schlepper Despite this box being the lighter of the two, by far, it is the more expensive of the two sets. When you see the contents though, the reason is pretty clear. This set has far more parts, and they are also vastly intricate in comparison to the Pressluftballonanhänger. It appears at first glimpse that this isn’t a set for the faint-hearted or impatient builder. Inside the box, there are two small white boxes containing resin parts, a single PE fret, a bag of wires, rod and chain, and of course, the instruction sheet. Inside one of the small inner boxes, you’ll find the large resin body of this vehicle, cast in black resin. A zip-lock back contains all of the other resin components, except for the wheels…..and there are a LOT of resin parts here too, with some of them being fairly small. The tractor body resembles an earth digger bucket, or a small skip, and has some very nice external detail. There is some underside detail to be fitted, but this will be minimal. Internally, the bin is empty, as all internal detail is provided with both resin and PE parts. There are around another 90 parts included in the small bag, all cast superbly, with no flaws, and with excellent detail. These are probably the best castings I’ve yet seen from Profimodeller. In all, a very impressive set of parts, including the small VW engine, transmission, fuel tank, battery and tray etc. This particular machine was fitted with a single wheel adaptation to the rear, making the tractor a ‘tricycle’ vehicle. This rear wheel is supported on a framework that is bolted to the flange at the rear of the Schlepper. All associated parts really are very good, and the wheel itself has beautiful tread too. There are a couple of tiny divots on it, presumably where the overcast spouts were removed, but this is mo problem. Connection to the casting block is around the portion of the wheel that you should perhaps use as the area closest to the floor. There will be just a little work required here to make that look ok. The second small box contains seven parts, cast in a light cream-coloured resin. Four of these parts are the main Schlepper wheels with their heavy, agricultural tread, and also the ‘Continental’ logo on the side. Detail is sharp, but the edges of the wheels are quite square, so I think a quick lick with a sanding stick, just to remove the extreme sharpness of the edge, will make it look a world better. There are no casting blocks there, and very little clean-up is required. Wheel hubs are superbly detailed and separately cast here, as are the bucket seat, main engine upper cowl, and the steering wheel block. Again, I have to say it; the detail really is excellent, and there is very little clean-up to perform on the parts themselves. A couple of parts had broken from their casting blocks, but were undamaged themselves. The bright brass PE fret must contain around another 100 parts. I really haven’t counted these, but I would say I’m not too far from the mark. Here are various plates, brackets, grilles, frameworks, drive and control mechanisms/linkages etc, and also the driver’s foot board. This is etched with a little faux-wood grain, and really wasn’t necessary if you choose to replicate that with oil paint, or the excellent Uschi van der Rosten wood grain decal. I will choose the latter option. Lastly, another bag contains a cast resin towing bar, length of aluminium rod for axles etc. resin bolts for the wheel hubs (Masterclub?), copper wire, chain and turned brass parts for the control levers. Instructions are simple, clear and easy to understand, with illustration being in line drawing format, with simple colour call-outs being supplied. Pressluftballonanhänger Inside this box, there are three smaller white boxes, another bag of resin parts, a bag of springs, ferrules, white and rod, two PE frets and the instruction sheet. The first box contains a bag of the numerous wheels employed by the Y frame. These are cast in pale creak resin, with nice hubs and subtle tread detail. Thankfully, the casting blocks are slightly offset onto the wheel face, meaning they don’t interfere with the tread pattern. Another bag of black resin parts include the gas inflation tanks, tank valves, and frame parts for the ‘Y’ section and also the wheel area, tank supports and hitching mechanism. This bag itself has a total of around 45 parts. The next two small boxes contain the parts that make this set a heavy one; the inflation bags. The breakdown of these is also to be noted. Two large inflation bags are supplied, complete with the heavy sealing and stitching detail at either side, and you will notice that the upper mid-section of each is missing. Those areas are provided as inserts, simply because you can choose to model the Pressluftballonanhänger without the weight of the Me 163 pressing down, or using the indented tanks, it can be displayed under the Komet. A quick test of these inserts showed that you need to adjust these to fit the bag recesses. There is also another bag of wheels included here, identical to the packet in the previous box, providing 4 wheels per side. A bag that sits in the bottom of the main box, contains two black resin parts, forming the main arms of the ‘Y’ frame, and will be added onto with numerous parts in the first box that we looked at. I have to say that these parts, as well as most of the rein in this set, are superbly cast. Only a rough casting block edge on those flotation bags, needs to be cleaned and smoothed, but that can be done at the same time that you remove the seams from the upper inserts. TWO photo-etch frets are included. These contain the various footplates, straps, tank and bag supports and parts for the compressed gas tank valves. Instructions for this set are also clear to understand, and follow the same format as those in the Schlepper kit. Basic colour call-outs are given, and the builder should experience no problems. Conclusion Until now, it’s seemed like Komet modellers in smaller scales have been better catered for than those of us who indulge in large scale pleasures. Hearing that Profimodeller were going to release these pair of kits, really was a pleasure for many of us. Of course, we had to bring it here to show you as soon as we could. Both kits are superbly designed, contain excellent detail, and the quality of the parts is as good as you could want. These won’t be easy kits to build, but the effort will certainly pay off when you mount that 1:32 Komet on that Pressluftballonanhänger!! I’ve got to say that I’m pretty impressed with both of these. VERY highly recommended My sincere thanks to Profimodeller for the review samples seen here. To purchase directly, click the links in the article. James H
  15. 1:32 Do 335 detail sets (For HK Models kit) Profimodeller Catalogue # see article for price and code Available from Profimodeller I was lucky enough to recently build a test shot of the new Dornier Do 335B-2, from HK Models. This was, apart from an HGW seatbelt set, an entirely out of box experience which was published in issue #43 of Military Illustrated Modeller. It had to be an OOB build, simply because there were no specific aftermarket sets out for it at that time. That's the beauty of working with test shots. However, the first company, to my knowledge, to release upgrade/detail sets is Profimodeller, and today we take a look at these four new sets, and what they offer, above standard kit detail. 32209, Do 335B-2 barrel set, 599,00 CZK 32210, Do 335 pitot tube, 119,00 CZK 32211, Do 335 interior, 159,00 CZK 32212, Do 335 exterior, 590,00 CZK Do 335B-2 barrel set Out of all four sets, this is the only one specifically classed as use for the B-2 variant of the Do 335, and for good reason. This specific version had an MK 103 mounted within a large pod which extended from the wing leading edge. The standard fighter version (A-0 as supplied soon from HKM), didn't have this. Having built the B-2, I found that I really needed to drill out the muzzle brake, as for some peculiar reason, HKM had seen fit not to actually mould this with the openings already there. Of course, with the plastic part, you also lack a little of the sharpness and attitude that the real muzzle brake had. This set actually comprises of TEN turned and machined parts which directly replace all four of the Heavy Fighter's guns. The muzzles will connect to a set of brass barrels, but you will only see the forward-most point of this, where the barrel protrudes through the end of the pod. One very weak area of the kit are the two cowl mounted barrels. In a kit where so much is slide-moulded, these barrels look quite weedy, and aren't hollow at the end either. On my kit, these were replaced with aluminium tube, but this set also now supplies these for you, and of course, at the correct length. A small sheet of instructions shows you the parts included in this set, which are bagged within a small zip-lock wallet, and also gives the kit part number which will need to be replaced. A direct, drop-fit. Do 335 pitot tube This very simple, but highly effective upgrade takes the rather lifeless looking pitot tube in the HKM kit, and replaces it with a spangly hollow-ended one which is beautifully machined. Before you can install your pitot, you will need to fill the small area at the wing leading edge, which is moulded with the plastic kit pitot. Once filled and sanded to shape, you can drill it and insert your replacement part. The real deal here is that there are TWO pitot options. I have to assume that reference indicates that both types were employed on the limited number of Do 335s that flew. Either way, at least you have an option. Do 335 interior Whilst this set isn't specifically slated for the B-2, there are elements within it that can't be fitted to the A-0, such as the rear view mirrors that fit within the B-2's canopy blisters. You really will have to check your reference for the minutiae. This set contains one fret of photo-etch parts, and a small length of neoprene tubing and copper wire. If I'm honest, I do think the HKM kit cockpit is actually very good, and all I added to mine was a missing ejection handle. Having said that, I was aware that there was a certain amount of detail which hadn't been replicated. This is where this set will pretty much redress that balance. Here, you will find substantial upgrades for both the seat and control stick. The seat will be fitted with a cushion, as well as new armrests and brackets. I'm not really convinced by the cushion, and would perhaps use a little putty to recreate this. For the control stick, there is a little photo etch, and you will also fit the neoprene tube to this too, bracketed with a PE clip. One area I did find lacking on the HKM kit were the rudder pedals. These were poorly detailed and grossly undersized. This set includes a replacement set, plus brackets on which to mount them. Quite a lot of the interior, whether it be the walls or floor, are sheathed in PE, beautifully detailed with rivet and fastener detail. One anomaly in the kit is the gun breech block near the pilot's feet. This is disconnected from the forward bulkhead, where the gun mould be mounted. This is also redressed too. Other detail included is the ejection handle I mentioned, and the linkages associated with it (that I didn't add to my build!), and also a little console lever and bezel detail. You will also find new rear bulkhead detail in this set, as well as canopy release handles. This set is more or less a complete transformation of the kit parts. Do 335 exterior This is by far the most extensive and complex upgrade set out of the four that we have, containing THREE photo etch sheets, which appear to be stainless steel. You first need to get it out of your head that anything in this set is really classed as 'external', maybe apart from the front engine radiator mesh. Essentially, more or less everything in here is actually still internal, with the exception of the cockpit set we've just looked at. That's actually just as well, because I did feel that I needed to add more detail to the interior of the Do 335 as I was building, but I simply didn't have the time to do so. I seriously wish I'd had this set when I was building that. So, what are these other interior areas that are catered for with this build? Well, these are the rear engine bay, intake areas, and crucially, the belly bomb bay. Curiously, there is no detail here for the main gear wells. Perhaps it doesn't need any, or maybe there will be a forthcoming set..... The rear engine bay is changed quite dramatically, from interior bulkhead detail, to a COMPLETE sheathing of the bay floor. This is actually one area that I did feel needed the detailer's touch, and I couldn't have asked for more. There is also supplementary detail to add to the floor, in the shape of various plates and brackets. Sidewall detail is also supplied, sitting against the floor. One very imposing part of this area is the separate fuselage spine. Internally, this is devoid of detail. Well, not anymore! A quite fragile, structural framework will sheath the inside of this area, creating the illusion of a framework and riveted metal. This alone will help to totally transform this area, which is actually visible if you look upwards into the bay. The intake area also now has a mesh grille on both front and rear faces, and a whole new rear facing duct system which extends through to the rear cooling flap openings. These themselves have a photo etch framework to sit within them. Lastly, the bomb bay also undertakes a partial transformation. There are some replacement fuel tank straps included here which are only suitable for the B-2, but the rest will also apply to the A-0 standard fighter. Numerous parts are supplied which will detail the load-carrying framework, and a good quantity of sidewall detail is also included, as well as whole new detail sections which were missing from the HK kit. This includes bracket detail, and also a part for what appears to the underside of an engine-bay sump. In all, this is one hell of an upgrade set, and really gets my juices flowing to start the A-0 very soon. All PE is superbly made, and the instructions are perfectly clear to follow. Conclusion Despite only completing my Do 335 a couple of months ago, these sets are sort of spurring me on to build the not-yet-released Do 335A-0 very soon. They offer heaps of refinement and extra detail that I was so keen to add to my first build. I do feel that building the model again, will offer an entirely different and even more pleasurable experience than I first had. Some areas will be quite finicky to detail but the reward will be very good. Others will entirely propel the model into a different class of detailing. In all, I am very impressed. VERY highly recommended My sincere thanks to Profimodeller for these review samples. To order directly, click the links in the article. James H
  16. It is a pleasure to start my new airplane now.... I built some other stuff (ships, military, ...) in the past days that's why I wasn't here onlie with news for longer time .... but now I received a pre-serial sample of HK-Models brand new DO-335 monster in 1/32 scale. Together with the brand new metal parts and photoeteched parts by profimodeller I will build the airplane with all hinges open...... Daimler-Benz DB 603 - Engines of the DO-335 First of all I glued together all the engine parts before paintig it all in black. Then I painted the details with a paintbrush before adding some oilcolor washings in black, brown and beige. After all drybrushing with Iron. Then adding Mig-pigments in beige on the engine and fixed them. Finally added oil on it with Tamiya smoke and worked with some different colors of Tamiya Weathering sets (Silver, beige, rust, black)..... Cheers Michael
  17. Hello, here is my finished B-17 "Flying Fortress" in scale 1/32 by HK Models. Additionally used the full Eduard sets, Resing and brass parts by Profimodeller, Eduard's fantastic wheel set, metal gear, decals by Kitmaker and some additional scratch built stuff. Here it is.... ... and here are some interieur pics: Thank you so much for your time and interest! BR Micha
  18. 1:32 MiG-15 Engine (for HpH release) Profimodeller Catalogue # 32119 Available from Profimodeller for 1590,00 CZK I have to say, I adore the very early jet aircraft. This was of course a technology which was still frighteningly new when the MiG-15 first took to the skies in 1947. Only two years earlier, the Messerschmitt Me 262 was still in operational use, being the world's first mass-produced jet fighter to enter front-line service. With the collapse of the Third Reich, Russia trialled much German technology, and only had limited success with their reverse engineering of both the Jumo 004 and BMW 003 jet engines. For their next generation of fighters, the Russians opted to buy the British Rolls Royce Nene power-plant, and reverse engineer this for their own purposes. To say the Russians were amazed that such technology was so easily purchased from the British Labour government, is a severe understatement. After purchasing the engines, Russian engine designer, Vladimir Klimov set to work and designed/developed the Klimov RD-45. A later attempt by Rolls Royce to rightfully claim a licence fee, ultimately failed. Klimov RD-45/VK-1 The Klimov RD-45 turbojet was quickly developed and first run in 1947, and the MiG-15 was specifically designed to operate with this new engine. Of course, the rest is history. The MiG-15 was a highly successful aircraft that was introduced into service in 1949, and set a further developmental path for the Russians. We'll look at this aircraft in more detail when we have the HpH kit here for you. There's nothing like doing something arse about face. My original intention was to have the review of the HpH MiG-15 kit online before I published this one, but sometimes, things are a little out of my control. I will endeavour to have the MiG-15 kit itself reviewed here, very early next year, followed by an online build of both items together. Until then, you'll have to satisfy yourself with this rather impressive engine upgrade said for the aforementioned kit. I'm sure you won't be disappointed. If you want to display with your HpH kit, you really are going to have to perform the most radical and destructive surgery possible, to two of the kit's main parts; namely the fuselage. The Klimov engine was bolted to a framework that was supported on a bulkhead in the middle of the MiG-15 fuselage. To access the engine, the rear fuselage was unbolted, and wheeled away on a trolley. So, in short, you're going to have to saw that fuselage in half, along pre-prescribed panel lines. If that fills you with trepidation, then rightfully so! Luckily though, this set provides a whole new rear section in resin, based upon the HpH kit itself. Therefore, the surface detail etc is identical. Having these new sections means that you don't have to re-use the old rear section and make any precision cuts to do so. You can saw the fuselage to the rear of the line, and then gradually work to that line and finish it properly. Those fuselage halves are superb. Cast in pale cream resin, surface detail is precise and sharp, with neat rivets and panel lines. It also has numerous service panels which are cast 'open', allowing you to choose how you will set the access doors themselves. Internally, there is no detail, but you will add the numerous metal construction elements from detailed PE strip, and you will also fit the PE airbrake housings (supplied in this kit too) into this area, along with the exhaust pipe tunnel. Even this can be accessed by a panel which you can pose. Whetted your appetite yet? Casting blocks are connected along the fuselage mating joint, and will need careful removal. Several openings also have a thin resin web that will need to be removed. There are another TWO bags of finely cast, cream resin, containing the various engine parts, and also those for other areas, such as the tail pipe and rear, external nozzle fairing. This is quite an impressive and imposing resin upgrade, with a total of almost FORTY parts, and that's not including the numerous sheets of PE which you'll need to negotiate. Using my Rolls Royce Nene reference, accompanied with images of the Klimov RD-45, it's very obvious that Profimodeller have created what amounts to an extremely accurate-looking reproduction. All of the parts which you would expect to see here, are included, and the breakdown of the engine means that no simple compromise has been made. If it's better to use 2 or 3 parts to recreate something, instead of one, then this set clearly demonstrates this. You can more or less pick out the various engine areas and identify them against period illustration. The engine comprises of nine combustion chambers (all separate parts and with their own PE section flanges), centre around various assemblies, including rear air intake and main compressor housing. Nozzle box and numerous other parts are beautifully recreated here, including the engine's ancillary control unit etc. When complete, the engine will look both comprehensive and very complicated. Numerous sections and several PE parts go together to create the exhaust pipe which attaches to the engine outlet, and will slide into the rear fuselage section tunnel. At least I'm presuming that these halves will more or less go together. If they don't, I wouldn't have issue with that, as this engine is supposed to be displayed. That's the whole point. Profimodeller have spared no expense in recreating this area in the best detail possible. Another bag of resin parts contains more ancillary parts, and the engine mounting framework. All resin has some clean-up which is needed, whether this is light flash, or the thoughtfully placed casting blocks. Detail is sharp throughout, and no flaws have been visible to this reviewer's eye. Several items such as the tubular sections for the exhaust, are thinly cast. You're going to have to like photo-etch if you wish to use this set. And I mean, really like it. There are no less than SEVEN photo-etch sheets here, containing everything from internal structural detail, to engine detail, exhaust pipe tunnel, access doors, bulkheads, and also both the internal and external airbrake assemblies. Etched relief detail is excellent, and all parts have minimal tags holding them to the frets. You may need to anneal some parts before use. Lastly, several short lengths of copper wire, and one length of neoprene tubing are included. The wire is quite thick, and I'm a little unsure where these items fit, but wire is required for shackling the access ports to the rear fuselage. For this, however, I imagine it should be thinner. I find the instructions for this set to be pretty clear, despite being of the drawing type. I have said, this is no weekend project, and the manual pretty much highlights this. Colour references are given throughout, but no actual manufacturer paint codes. The last page is given over to the various access plate construction, and where they fit on the rear fuselage. This is certainly an upgrade which offers many options for the builder. Conclusion It's fair to say that this isn't a cheap upgrade, but in all fairness, for what you get, it is very well priced; a full engine and internal rear detail suite, plus half of the fuselage, and all that photo etch. I think thank once you get your head around the mass of PE, this set should build up pretty easily. Hacking the kit fuse in half will always be a nervy part of the build, but this is one upgrade which will surely set your MiG-15 above anything else out there. Absolutely superb! Very highly recommended My sincere thanks to Profimodeller for this review sample. To purchase directly, click THIS link. James H
  19. Hi all, Recent months on LSM haven't been too kind to me with maintaining build logs and having to postpone and in lots of cases, cancel entire projects. If you expected to see that Fokker D.VII, it won't happen yet. If you were waiting for the Me 410, it won't happen yet. If you were waiting for the 1:48 He 219, it won't happen yet. I think you get the idea. My time isn't running in a linear manner, and commitments have often seen things constantly shift. In an attempt to break deadlock, I'm rolling a project I've had in the sidelines for a long time; a Junkers Ju 88D-1. This is essentially an 88A-4, but with a few very minor external changes. The machine's main differences are in areas we simply won't see. Where the real change here is that this machine will carry AMERICAN markings, and odd ones too. Camouflage is actually of the RAF desert type, with an azure blue underside. Check out that US flag too! I'll use the Revell Ju 88A-4 kit, along with Eduard's BIGED set and Brassin resin wheels. Profimodeller will supply the tail wheel and main gear wells. Exposed fuel tank will be from CMK. I'll ask Mal to make masks for this, as 1:32 decals don't exist. I hope you like it.
  20. 1/32 Gloster Meteor Engine Profimodeller P32191 (Engine Bay + Engine) Available from Profimodeller for € 46,50 When I spoke to Neil Yan from HK Models at Telford last year we chatted about the Meteor and he explained the strategy behind the rather basic Meteor kit. There are modellers who think the aesthetic lines of their subject get are ruined by opening hatches. They can build the Meteor from the box. Canopy closed. No excess sprues and parts will go to waste with this modeller and as a result the price will stay as low as possible. This is quite an opposite approach from Zoukei Mura for instance. Neil predicted that lots of After Market upgrades would appear for the more prolific modeller that likes to open it all up. I hope this kind of thinking marks a new trend where the modeller can go crazy all he wants. It’s also a way to open the door to modelling for people (re-)entering the hobby, since the prizes stay “low” and the detail and parts count don’t scare them away indefinitely. Apart from opening the gunbay, you can now open up an engine too and show off the amazing Rolls Royce Derwent engine. As an engine that plays an important role in history, AND one that has not been rendered in 1/32 before in detail, it deserves some attention to detail. And that’s just what it got. Don’t expect to saw a hole in your wing where you can drop a chunk of resin in. Countless resin and PE parts make up this engine, making it a feast for the eye. Note: This engine set is for the LEFT WING ONLY. Since the gun bay set is for the left side too, it’s perfect for showing your Meteor with hatches open from one side, and all closed up from the other side. The set comes in a sturdy flip top box that’s filled to the rim with resin, huge photo etch sheets and a rather extensive instruction booklet. It’s not difficult to find photo reference of the Rolls Royce Derwent engine one the net. Many examples found their way to museums and are preserved well in original paint. You’ll see they are two tone: gloss black / aluminium. What’s more difficult is to find photo’s of the engine inside the Meteor, while under maintenance, but I did manage to find you one J 1/1 scale Engine dimensions: 1550 mm (Height), 1250 mm (Width), 2300 mm (Length) Contents You’ll find three separate plastic bags inside the box. One bag of resin. One bag with 5 sheets of photo etch and one small bag with wiring material. Both wiring and tubing. You’ll need a bit of experience with photo etch and resin to tackle this engine. The photo etch contains some larger parts that need delicate handling in order to get into shape. Especially the sheets that make up the intake and rear. This is actually an omission in the kit which does not feature the tube like insides of the engine. So… you’ll need to fashion a similar tube shape for the right engine. Cees Broere used the aluminium of a beer can for his build. This set includes everything you need to make up the interior of the engine bay, intake, engine… The only thing I would have loved to see was either inner detail for the hatch or a whole new hatch from photo etch all together. But that might be nitpicking. The resin needs minimal clean up and the larger parts are casted from the side which means you don’t have to saw through 1,5 cm of resin, causing cross eyed looks from the missus. Instructions Prepare and get out your reference photo’s! I studied the instructions and whilst they are clear and extensive, it can be rather puzzling how and at what angle a part needs to join. That has to do with the style. It shows you the part and an arrow that points at where it goes, but it doesn’t show you the part in place. For some subassemblies schematics are included, but some parts make you look thrice. That’s when reference comes into play. Conclusion Frank Whittle will be proud! A super detailed model of his brainchild (or at least it’s offspring). With some careful planning, studying and preparing this set can turn the basic HK Models Meteor kit into a show-stopper. I can’t wait to start mine. This certainly is a well researched subject and is complete all around. Enabling you to even pose it alongside your Meteor on a metal stand perhaps? One proud Frank Whittle Very highly recommended Our sincere thanks to ProfiModeler for the review sample. To purchase directly, click HERE. Jeroen Peters
  21. 1/32 Gloster Meteor Upgrades Interior – Air Brake – Gun Bay Profimodeller 32195 (Interior) – 32200 (Air Brake) – 32193 (Gun Bay) Available from Profimodeller for: 32195 - Interior: € 7,20 32200 - Air Brake: € 4,30 32193 - Gun Bay: € 17,90 HK Model’s 1/32 Gloster Meteor F.4. A relatively simple kit with limited parts that builds into a nice rendition of the Meteor straight from the box and can also form the base for a super detialed Meteor. For the latter these three sets are a great start. The pro’s of the HK Models Meteor are subtle service detail, great fit and proper dimensions. The Air intakes and canopy could have been better though, but I won’t go into those here. The Czech company ProfiModeller has proven to be a great partner for the new chinese model brand by making upgrade sets for their B25, Do335 and B-17. I really like the way the chop up the detail areas into small bags. One for the interior. One for the Gun bay. Not one huge interior upgrade, but the choice of how far to go. Both in detail, as in budget. The interior This is a need to have in my opinion. The area behind the pilot seat is hard to find reference on. Beleive me, I tried… The HK Models model features a flat undetailed area. This set let’s you build the frame and canopy sliding unit that belongs there. The instrument panel on the HK Models kit is detailed, but could definately benefit from some colored dials and refined detail. I myself am not a huge fan of transparant film with dials that you need to sandwich between PE panels. They lack color and need white paint on the back to make the dials pop. The latest Eduard dials are nice, but still not as sharp in detail as I’d like to see. Profimodeller provides a piece of fine printed card in color that needs to be glued between the plastic kit panel and the PE panel. Last there is a PE gunsight. A prominent feature in the Meteor’s pit. 6 parts make up this instrument. Especially nice detail on the switch that lets the pilot select it’s opponents wingspan in order for the aiming computer to make the correct calculations. The Air Brake If you decide to model your Meteor with the Air brakes open, this is a set that will make a difference. The Air brakes on the Meteor are positioned on top of the wings and below. The fine photo etch does not appear to pose a challenge and personally I love the fine rivets rendered on these parts. Also included in this set is the trim tab on the rudder. Which is a nice detail. The Gun Bay Now this is THE set I was anticipating the most. Truth be told: I started researching this area in order to 3D model and print this section myself. That urge quickly dissapeared when told Profimodeller was ahead of me. The instructions are very clear, which they need to be, since this set means surgery on your model. Cutting out the hatches that cover both the barrels and the rear access area to the gun breeches. A resin tub fits inside, accomodating the two resin guns. Overall nice and delicate detail. Checking the parts with my (scarce) references, all the elements are there. What I love is the panel framing made from photo etch. These will need careful handling and glueing. The same goes for the inner detail / framing of the hatches. Very nicely done. Before taking the saw and scalpel to engage your Meteor, check your references and study the manual. As you can see in the photo’s ProfiModeler provides you with clear and extensive instructions that explain which parts to cut out and what to sand off in order to make this set fit. I myself found it hard to find good photo reference material of the Meteor’s gunbay. Which is the reason I hadn’t started this project myself just yet. That’s why I’m also grateful ProfiModeler provides us with coloring instructions (mostly black J). The resin for the tub that accomodates the gun breeches is nicely cast in cream resin and needs minimal cleanup. The same goes for the two gun bodies. The two grey pieces of resin make up for the gunports that house the blast tubes. The barrels and these blast tubes are turned brass. All the other parts you’ll find in the photo etch fret. Actually the only thing not included is some wiring. In case you’re wondering: i prefer thin lead wire. Easy to bend, easy to glue and more natural to drape. Overal a very complete, well researched and detailed kit. Conclusion Upon getting my Meteor I knew I wouldn’t start mine until some after market sets became available. Actually I was betting on Eduard to treat us first, but ProfiModeller was quick on the ball. As I write this HGW released a set for the seatbelts. Nicely complimentary to this set! The HK Models Meteor is (as said) a nice basic kit straight from the box. I’ve seen a couple of them built and it really doesn’t need that much. Again: not talking about the canopy and intakes here! But if you want to open the canopy and add some detail under her skirt, this is a great way to go. I think it won’t be long till more sets appear on the market (gearbay?) and I hope they will be done by ProfiModeler. Mixed media, clear instructions and great detail. Stay tuned for a review of the ProfiModeller Meteor Engine set. Very highly recommended Our sincere thanks to ProfiModeller for the review samples. To purchase directly, click HERE. Jeroen Peters
  22. 1:32 Junkers Ju 88 main gear bay Profimodeller Catalogue # 32158 Available from Profimodeller for 499,00 CZK We recently reviewed the new Ju 88 bomb bay detail set which allowed the modeller to create a highly detailed weapons bay within the belly of their kit, and today we take a look at our second upgrade set the 1:32 Revell Junkers Ju 88A model kit. This set can be safely used with both the A-1 and newer A-4 releases. The main gear bays (we reviewed the tail gear bay HERE) are quite cavernous on such a large model, and this is one area where Revell have really omitted to detail to the standard they achieved on the rest of the kit. Again, this set comes in quite a large and sturdy, top-opening box, but the reason for this is primarily due to the size of the photo etch sheet, which makes up the majority of components in this release. This photo etch sheet is packed into a zip-lock wallet with a card stiffener, and on the other side of the card is a smaller, secondary photo etch sheet. A small wallet of creamy pale yellow resin parts is also included, as well as an eight page A5 instruction booklet. What this set doesn't deal with is the undercarriage legs themselves. The kit parts are actually very good, and if you can get the much sought-after G-Factor legs, then even better. This detail in this set starts with the bracket onto which each gear leg sits. Revell have got the shape of this more or less correct, but it is totally devoid of detail. With the aid of this set, these brackets are sheathed in riveted metal plate detail as well as a number of extra parts added which add a forward bulkhead ahead of this bracket. Resin parts are included for gas cylinders which sit within the oleo brackets. Look into the gear bays of this model and you see a vast expanse of the wing underside area which is simply blank. Large PE parts included here are used to sheath this area, detailing it with stiffening plates and access ports. This is also added to with a little extra PE detail in order to make it less 2D in appearance. Nacelle interiors are to be fitted with structural elements which will require a little light surgery to the plastic parts, with the main gear nacelle area also have a structural frame to fit within and some small formers. The largest surgery to be carried out for this release, concerns this rear section of the gear nacelle. Revell have moulded these with the main undercarriage doors in a closed position, which isn't incorrect in itself, but what if you want to pose these in an open manner? This set allows this as it contains laminated panels which assemble to recreate the main gear doors. You will need to remove the plastic for the moulded version, and use this as a guide to bending the flat PE ones into this rather complex shape. I suggest you anneal these parts and form them individually before of course laminating them using CA gel or perhaps even white glue (providing you got the fit extremely good). These doors are using PE hinges and you will need some lengths of styrene rod for this, and other aspects of this upgrade/detail set. Something Revell missed with regard to the undercarriage doors, of course, was the actuator piston, which is provided here as a resin part. For the forward gear doors, you need to remove the moulded hinge and replace with a PE one which also incorporates the stiffening strip running along the door edge. Photo etch quality is excellent throughout with some wonderful relief detail, parts are held to the fret with thin, narrow tags. The parts also clearly numbered, with arrows to further help you identify the parts. Two small blocks of resin parts are supplied, and these are nicely detailed, with flaw-free casting. The instructions for this set need some careful study before assembly, especially with regard to the main gear doors. Illustration is by means of line drawings, spread over 28 constructional stages. Paint colours are given, but not with specific manufacturer codes, but for a release such as this, you can pretty much use the colours described on the main kit release. Conclusion This is another excellent detail set from Profimodeller, but again, not one to be used if you aren't used to a little hack and slash with kit parts. Some skill will be needed to shape those tricky main gear doors. I do suggest that if you can remove the main gear doors with a razor saw, and have them intact, that you perhaps use these and simply fit the internal PE detail skin to them. Another option is perhaps to still leave these rear doors closed, and just benefit from the detail in the forward gear area. There is a lot to be gained from adding this release to your project, even if your super-detail interest is only fleeting, as the cavernous bays really do call for a little something extra to be added. Highly recommended Our sincere thanks to Profimodeller for this review sample. To purchase directly, click THIS link. James H
  23. 1:32 Junkers Ju 88 bomb bay Profimodeller Catalogue # 32070 Available from Profimodeller for 1 490,00 CZK It's been quite a while since we looked at our last Profimodeller sets, designed for Revell's 1:32 Ju 88 kit, and we're pleased to have several more, more recent sets here that have been sent onto SP&R HQ. The first one up is designed to create an entire bomb bay for this model. When you bear in mind that the Revell kit supplies nothing in the way of this in plastic form, you'll see that this is both an ambitious and complicated undertaking. However, Profimodeller have done just that, and produced the detail-laden set we are about to look at here. The box for this release is a fairly reasonable size, and pretty packed out with both resin and photo etch parts. I warn you that this detail set isn't for the faint-hearted, and I advise both patience and care when it comes to planning and installing it. That rather sturdy, top-lid opening box has a glossy label on it depicting an exploded view of the bay, and inside, two zip-lock bags are chock full of creamy yellow colour resin. There is a distinct whiff of some sort of solvent/chemical too, indicating the presence of mould release agent. Whilst the bags are dry internally, the parts do seem to have a slight slippery residue which you'll need to carefully clean away before assembly. A large sheet of photo etch is also included, as is a series of instruction sheets with a LOT of constructional stages. More on that soon, but we'll look at the resin parts first, starting with the bag with the largest components. Same bulkheads, opposite side Revell designed their kit to incorporate two bulkheads from which wing spars protrude. One of these forms the rear cockpit wall, without any detail to the rear of it, where the bomb bay would be. Ironically, the rear bulkhead whose internals are completely hidden, includes some rudimentary detail as if Revell perhaps did originally intend to produce a bomb bay? What perhaps also gives this away is its location, which is in exactly the correct position for the middle bulkhead in the bomb bay. It's with this great start that Profimodeller have designed this new set. Interior side walls This kit contains brand new, highly detailed bulkheads and protruding spars to replace the kit parts. You still need to remove the hollow spars from the Revell parts and fit them over the resin spars, as a sort of sleeve. This is done so that the wings still hang onto something both plastic and rigid, unlike resin which can be more brittle. With these installed, you still have an entirely plastic to plastic contact surface on the outside. There is actually a third spar-less bulkhead which fits at the rearmost position of the bay, produced in high detailed resin. You now have, effectively, two bomb bay chambers. Some bulkheads have what looks like connectors for pipes/conduits in the roof area, but nothing here is mentioned. I'll have to check references to clarify whether they need, and indeed can be piped up. These bulkheads will be detailed further with a combination of PE wiring loom and other PE parts, resin parts and also lead wire, of which you need to avail yourself. Work begins by dry-fitting the newly plastic-sheathed bulkhead/spar parts into the fuselage slots, and then marking their inner wall positions with a pencil. You now remove these until work on them is complete and the bay is assembled externally. In between these pencilled areas you will fit the interior walls, complete with former and stringer detail, as well as a little wiring and piping which will again be supplemented by wire and photo etch parts, as well as some secondary photo etch cap strips for the vertical formers. All in all, very impressive. Two wall pieces, at first, looked to have been thinly cast from the rear, but investigation shows that these thin areas need to be removed, as it coincides with the blisters in the external skin. As far as the interior walls go, there was a little damage to some cast wiring detail, but nothing that can't be fixed within a few minutes with some 0.2mm lead wire. Of course, the inner ceiling needs some detail, and two parts are designed to fit onto the underside of the upper spine. Details here coincide with that on the plastic exterior, and is very good indeed. The various structures within the bay are constructed from a combination of photo etch and resin, such as the ceiling gantries, bomb racks and other devices within the bays. You have to know at this point that there are no bombs supplied in this kit, but I think to include them would detract, and most definitely hide, all that detail which you'll work hard to install. Some surgery will be needed in order to cut the lower fuselage belly so that the bomb bay can be displayed. This is perhaps one area which is a little unclear on the instructions. Whilst you can see where the cut needs to be made, no reference is made to any curvature which needs to be induced in the photo etch bomb bay doors. These doors are connected by tabs, and also have the operating rods which will need to be attached, using styrene rod (described as wire in the instructions). As well as those doors needing to be curved, the outer ones also don't appear to sit exactly on the junction from where the old plastic belly used to sit. This you will need to carefully measure up when it comes to installing the bay, and preferably before you cut that belly apart to use this bay. You might need to use the curved outer edges of the belly, alongside the metal bay doors, if a gap results between the doors and fuselage sides. A large, bare brass PE fret is included which contains many key parts of this structure, such as former cap rips, wiring, bay doors, gantry parts and bomb rack fixing plates etc. Production quality is excellent. An ELEVEN page construction manual is supplied, with 36 sequences to follow, and I do warn you that you really need to concentrate on this and acquaint yourself with the construction before you glue anything together. It's also advisable to get some photographic reference of this area too. I'll try to do this for you too, and publish on Large Scale Modeller's walkaround area. All drawings are in line drawing format, with most stages and areas being relatively straightforward after some study. Other areas are perhaps a little more ambiguous, but may well become more relevant during construction itself. Colour call-outs are given in general word terms, with the interior seeming to be grey. I need to check this again, as I believed that it could well have been a metallic-looking yellow colour which was the result of the electrolytic process the metal underwent to protect it from corrosion. Conclusion Well, what a set! This is probably the ultimate, and certainly most complicated detail set that I have ever seen for the Ju 88, but the finished result should look simply amazing. There is a lot of work to undertake here, and it's not going to be a walk in the park when it comes to getting everything to fit together, but patience should be extremely rewarding. Highly recommended Our sincere thanks to Profimodeller for this review sample. To purchase directly, click THIS link. Watch out for more Ju 88 sets from Profimodeller, to be reviewed here soon James H
  24. 1/32 Beer Kegs for Tamiya Mk.IX Spitfire Profimodeller Catalogue # 32065 Available directly from ProfiModeller for 319,00 CZK During the Second World War, brewery Henegar and Constable donated free beer to the Troops. After the D-Day landings in Normandy, supplying the war effort with critical supplies was already an issue and as you could imagine, carting liquid refreshments was pushed down the vital supply list. Some crafty soldiers were able to source the non-essential supplies from the locals or by other means. It was the RAF Spitfire pilots that ended up with a better solution. This was eventually recognised as an official modification by the RAF... It was called Modification XXX! With the new Mk.IX Spitfire variant, one of its improvements/developments were under wing pylons for external fuel tanks and bombs. But with a bit of clever ingenuity it was discovered that a pylon could be modified to carry nearly anything... including Beer Kegs! ProfiModeller have designed a neat conversion set for the modification XXX to be used on the 1/32 Tamiya Mk.IX Spitfire. Which is available directly from their website, Product # 32065 (http://www.profimodeller.com/detail/32065-beer-kegs-spitfire/) This set contains 34 resin parts for the beer kegs, 1 Photo Etch Fret, 1 plastic rod and a sheet of vinyl paint masks for two beer carrying Spitfire schemes. The resin parts are cast in a cream coloured resin, which are beautifully cast and are free of air bubbles or any imperfections. The resin staves have a wood grain cast into them, so if you are worried about wood grain finishes you will just need to paint and just add an oil wash with a darker brown to bring out the wood grain. The PE fret carries the metal hoops for each barrel and mounting plates for the pylons. The vinyl mask set includes serial numbers and squadron codes for two Spitfires, but you will have to use the kits decals or source your vinyl paint masks for the roundel and fin flash. The two Spitfires that are included – Spitfire Mk.IXc, MK823, JE-J JR, Wing Commander J.E. "Johnnie" Johnson, 144th Wing, June 1944. Spitfire Mk.IXc, MH978, M-FF, 132nd Wing RAF, June1944. So what do we think? Throughout different conflicts there have been some "interesting" items attached to aircraft, and this surely is one of them! An interesting and easy conversion set for the Tamiya Mk.IX Spitfire kit which will surely make your Spitfire pop out of out of a row of them! Highly recommended Our sincere thanks to ProfiMoldeller for the review sample used here. To purchase this directly, click THIS link.
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