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Found 7 results

  1. 1:32 Focke-Wulf Fw 190F-8 cockpit and gun bay (for Revell kit) Eduard Catalogue # see article for code and price Available from Eduard Following hard on the heels of the undercarriage struts and wheels that we looked at recently, are two brand new sets that are designed for Revell’s recent Fw 190F-8 kit. Having built the test shot, and being in receipt of the production kit, I do know there are a few areas where the new Würger is let down a little. Whilst the cockpit is passable, it isn’t state of the art, and the forward gun bay is probably the worst feature of the kit, due to being both poor and lacking in much detail. The plastic parts, for me, were quite rudimentary, and the gun cowl was thick and lacked any interior detail. That pretty much kills that area for me, and you would either need to be a super-scratchbuilder or simply not bothered about it, to be able to display this area. Again, Eduard come to the rescue with these two new Brassin releases. 632056, Fw 190F-8 cockpit, 37,45 € 632060, Fw 190F-8 MG131 mount, 29,95 € Fw 190F-8 cockpit This set, presented in Eduard’s familiar satin black box, is designed to be a simple, drop-replacement set for the kit plastic parts. A quick scan of the instructions shows that to be the case, with no surgery needed to the host plastic, whatsoever. Inside the box, we see the three-sheet instructions, folded over some soft grey foam. Lift this out and you will find a one-piece resin cockpit tub, three small zip-lock wallets of resin, two photo-etch frets (one in colour), and a small decal sheet. Just as Revell made their tub in one piece, Eduard has designed theirs to fit the kit using the attachment points already present on the Revell styrene. As I know the Revell part very well, I have to say that, for detail, there is no comparison. The detail here is more numerous, accurate and certainly sharper. The ugly moulded-on throttle of the Revell part is a separate part here, which will attach neatly to the lever channel. Eduard really have made a beautiful job here, with a better looking foot plate and shield that covers the control column linkage, and the turtle-deck is a big improvement too. Not only is the stowage door is provided as a separate piece, there are two PE options provided. Removal of the casting block should be fairly easy too, and remember to also remove the resin web from the wall behind the pilot’s seat. Packet 1 Six parts are to be found here, cast in the same light grey resin that the tub itself is made from. Eduard’s seat really is excellent, being both thinly cast, and containing neat rivet detail and mounting attachment points. Two optional parts are also included for this. These are the main seat cushion, and separate lower back padding. The latter was missing from the Revell release. Also included here are resin replacement parts for one headrest option. Eduard supply a new instrument coaming too. Packet 2 Cast in a darker grey resin, the second canopy internal frame option is included. The armoured headrest for this is in the next package. Here you will also find a perfect-looking control stick (vastly different from the weedy looking thing in the kit!), the rudder pedal frames. Connection of the frame and canopy interior are easy to saw through, being thin resin membranes that require minimal effort to remove. Packet 3 Notice that Eduard have opted NOT to include a colour PE instrument panel here. The bezels and other detail on the Fw 190 instrument panel, perhaps don’t lend themselves too well to the 3D relief that is required? Maybe. Either way, the split level panel is supplied as resin parts, with blank instrument dial faces into which you can apply the decals that come with this set. As you can see from photos, the detail is really very good, with wiring also included. Optional panels are also included for WGr.21 rockets, or for the MG FF controller unit. These themselves are attached to one of two panel options. Another floor mounted instrument panel is included, as are two gun-sight option, with clear acetate parts for the lenses. Other parts include hood release handle. Photo Etch As standard, Eduard seem to include the colour-PE seatbelts in these cockpit upgrades. If I’m really honest, I’d much prefer to see the inevitable textile set included instead, as these are far more realistic and easy to manipulate. Still, a full set of belts is included, and printing is very good. The brass fret contains the bulk of the extra detail for this set, including stowage panel door options, levers, rudder pedals and mounting frames, forward hood facing, sliding hood elements etc. As you can see, quality is everything you would expect from Eduard, with narrow, thin attachment points, and fine detailing. Decals All instruments are supplied as separate decals, and ideally, you should punch them out so as to eliminate every trace of carrier film. This will make them easier to apply. Decals are included for the warning shield on the pilot’s headrest. Just a thought, but if these are included, maybe some replica placards would be good too, such as those that Barracuda produce for the Mustang and Corsair. Again, just a thought…. Printing is very good, and is thin, in register and there is minimal carrier film. Instructions You really should have zero problems in assembling this product. Illustrations are clear and concise, and optional parts are self-explanatory. Mr Hobby paint codes are supplied throughout too. There are three folded A4 sheets here that makes use of different coloured inks to show the demarcation between resin and plastic parts. Fw 190F-8 MG131 gun mount This set corrects perhaps the weakest element of the Revell kit. Discard those plastic parts and install this beautifully detailed gun bay, complete with a thinly cast and amazing looking gun cowl! Packed into a clear blister packet, this set contains TEN resin parts, and a further NINETEEN photo-etch pieces, all designed to totally transform this area of the host kit. Resin parts are cast in a combination of light and dark grey resin. It seems that the darker resin tends to be used for the more fragile parts, perhaps with a slightly different and more flexible property to them. The light grey parts include the upper weapons tray, ammunition boxes, feed chutes and empty shell chutes. Just compare the kit part against Eduard’s resin weapons tray, with its connectors, wiring and other detail. Then look at the guns for comparison. Now you can see why I consider this set to be essential, if you wish to pose this area in an open position. I think these MG131 guns are an absolute work of art. Ammunition boxes have their riveting, neatly cast strap handles, and of course, hollow shell ejector chutes. It did seem that Revell perhaps knew their gun bay detail was more than a little bit pants. They made no real effort to produce a thin, detailed cowling. The clunky and internally featureless affair isn’t very good. However, Eduard’s resin alternative is a world away in terms of quality. It is so thin that light streams through the resin when it’s held to the light. Externally, the detail of this looks great, with neat riveting, and recessed cowl latch areas. Internally, all the constructional elements can be seen, including the rear of the latch recesses. Also the hinge matches up perfectly to that moulded on the weapons tray. Now….who will be the first to try and drill/pin these so they move? The PE parts include a sheathing for the kit bulkhead, providing some good detail, as well as a couple of frames that attach to this. You will also find the cowl latches here and a nice addition too, namely the windscreen wash tubes. With the latter, I would still possibly make these from thin lead wire, but at least Eduard included them. Again, the instructions are easy to follow, but you will have to conduct the most basic of surgery to the internal bulkhead. Colour call-outs are supplied for Mr Hobby paints. Conclusion. I love what Eduard has created for this kit. Revell did a great job with the new 190F-8, generally. The look and feel of it, to me, is correct, and these sets add that detail that I just love to see. Both sets are reasonably priced, and won’t break the bank. Surgery is minimal, if any is required at all, and as a result, a relative notice should be able to fit these to their model too. What I now wonder is if we’ll see a super-detailed BMW801 engine to compliment these sets. I really do hope so! VERY highly recommended! My sincere thanks to Eduard for these review samples. To purchase directly, click the links in the review. James H
  2. Eduard F-104C Interior Set Product Number 32 819 for Italeri Available from many online stores or directly from Eduard for €22,95 As mentioned in the F-104A Zoom-set review, Eduard also markets sets with more details than just the bare necessities. This is such a set for the F-104C. Although the coloured fret at first looks like it's the same as the one provided in the F-104A set, that isn't the case. If you look at the right side of the main IP you see one of the main differences between the F-104A and -C IP's. The F-104A has three small gauges above each other (tachometer, exhaust temperature gauge and exhaust nozzle position indicator) flanked on the right side by one large gauge; the fuel quantity indicator. The F-104C has those same three gauges, but on the right side one can find three small gauges instead of one large: the fuel flow indicator, oil pressure gauge and the automatic pitch control indicator. Eduard copied this admirably. What is probably NOT accurate is part 50; the armament control panel. As in the F-104A set, the part of the gunsight control switches is red, which is not the case on the F-104C in the Air Force Museum; F-104C-5-LO 56-914. BTW, note the triangular shaped ejection handle on this C2 seat, indicative that it's an early C2: militaryfactory.com Michael Benolkin, TacAir Publications Michael Benolkin, TacAir Publications The second fret contains mainly parts for the walls of the side consoles and the inside of the hatch that was originally used for the downward ejection seat. The set doesn't provide the parts in such a way that you can dispense with the cockpit floor altogether. That would've been the most accurate as the F-104 never had a true cockpt floor. Somewhat like the F4U Corsair... PreservedAC In practice, between the stick, the foot boards and the sidewalls there wasn't much room, so it may not be too noticeable. But since you cannot show the model with it's seat removed, the parts for the inside of the lower hatch are somewhat of a waste of metal... I think that providing sidewalls that go no further than the imaginary floor is a missed opportunity, even if Eduard always claims "only to add detail, not to improve accuracy". Look at Eduard's instructions to see what I mean. Although I REALLY am a bit dissapointed about the floor issue, I still give this set a Highly Recommended as it provides enough other details that really enhance your F-104C Starfighter cockpit. My thanks go to Eduard for providing us with the review sample.
  3. Eduard F-104A cockpit ZOOM-set. Product-number 33-142. Available from many online stores or direct from Eduard for €18,75. For quite some years now, Eduard gives the modeller the choice between complete interior / cockpit sets or basic sets to only tackle the key parts of the cockpit such as instrument panels and the like. This set is one of the latter; a ZOOM-set. Instead of two frets of PE as in the other Interior-set, you only get the coloured PE fret. The set does include parts to dress up the cockpit sills and has parts for new rudder pedals however. I don't have too much info on the F-104A cockpit but from looking at the drawings and photo in the "F-104 Starfighter in Detail & Scale" it looks like Eduard did their homework. The Instrument Panel does feature the differences I could see between the F-104A and C for instance. I don't know if the gunsight control panel (part 50) would have been predominantly red, however. The F-104C has the same panel that on F-104C-5-LO 56-914 in the Air Force Museum is completely black. The single B&W-shot of the F-104A cockpit that I have doesn't show a tonal difference between the black panel and the red. But then again, I don't know if a tonal difference would show up between those colours in a B&W photo... It may be that it was because the F-104A flew until 1964 without a gun, but really, that's just guessing on my part. Dan Siegle from The Dan Zone is or was busy building a 3D model of the F-104A cockpit. In the line of that quest he posted this composite picture of the F-104A cockpit -made from the original manual pictures- on his site: You can use it to check out the basics of the set, regarding the instrument panel and side consoles. The Eduard instructions give you an idea which parts are incorporated and which areas of the cockpit are treated. This set will give your F-104A model a boost by significantly upgrading the cockpit. Highly Recommended! I like to thank Eduard for providing the review sample.
  4. 1:32 F4U-1A cockpit Eduard 'Brassin' Catalogue # 632053 Available from Eduard for €41,25 Bunny Fighter Club price: €35,06 It hasn't taken Eduard as long to release a complete cockpit upgrade for the recent 1:32 Tamiya F4U-1A Corsair as it did for the initial Birdcage variant, and I'm pretty pleased about that. Having the kit in my stash for a pending magazine project, and knowing the level of detail within the cockpit, it may seem surprising that a whole resin replacement is now available, but just wait until you see this! You really won't want to build that kit without first seeing the detail that this upgrade offers. Before you say it though, yes, this set does differ from the original F4U-1 cockpit. I can't give a list of general changes, but the pilot seat on the F4U-1A set is in a higher position than it its predecessor. Eduard have used their satin black cardboard package for this release, and before you open it, you can feel that it's quite weighty. When opened, you'll see that part of that weight are the four, double sided and folded instruction sheets required for this project, followed by SIX bags of resin which is cast in a combination of light grey, mid grey and clear, plus a small wallet with two PE frets and an instrument panel decal. Two casting blocks are packaged within the main box, un-bagged due to their delicate nature. The resin parts are protected within the box by pieces of soft grey foam, and the instructions are wrapped around these for extra security. This is going to be no quick project, and the FOURTY-NINE pieces of resin and around SIXTY photo-etch parts, are testimony to that. Strangely enough, I'm attracted to the bag with the two largest parts first, plus those loose parts: Eduard appear to use the darker resin for the thinner components, and here, these are the deeply curved floor and the upper side walls which are attached at a late stage in construction. Light grey resin is used for the forward and rear bulkheads. The detail within these key areas is stunning, with plenty of subtle detail hiding around the key structures and avionics/pipework/cabling. I have to say that some carefully applied washes and dry brushing will bring levels of detail out that would normally be overshadowed by the larger cockpit components. Holding the various parts together, you can see that a lot of effort has been made in ensuring that detail areas, such as constructional elements, line up perfectly, as was seen in the 1:48 Spitfire Mk.IX cockpit replacement set. There are a number of minor webs on the cockpit floor, underneath cabling and pipes, and this will need careful trimming away. This goes for the main, central web in the floor too. These thinner, fragile parts are connected to their casting blocks via thin resin walls which look easy to remove and clean up. You will fine smoothly recessed areas on the sidewalls into which the side consoles will neatly fit, so there will be no guesswork here. A number of avionics boxes and cabling are included too. The main, light grey components for the bulkheads are a detail painters dream; especially the forward bulkhead with its mass of pipes, wiring, junction boxes etc. My only real criticism of these parts are the quite thick casting blocks which will need some elbow-grease to remove and clean up. This is a very complex set and one which will bore the pants off you if I describe every single piece (many of which I couldn't' even put a name to), so from here, let's take a look at this bag by bag, with photos, using captions where appropriate. I will also highlight anything which I think you should be aware of. Wallet 2 Wallet 3 Wallet 4 Here we can see that Eduard have given the choice of two different instrument panels. A full resin part is supplied, including cast instrument detail. Those instruments also have dial detail, so unless you're into dry brushing and micro-detail painting, you might prefer the other option. That second option is a resin panel with only a minor amount of cast detail. A first layer of PE is then applied, and then the instrument decal. Finally, a PE fascia is overlaid to complete the panel. This will be painted, and onto this you will lay the instrument decal before then applying the fascia. In an unusual move, this fascia panel is supplied as base brass, and is not colour-printed. Wallet 5 Wallet 6 All resin parts have been thoughtfully connected to their casting blocks in the least obtrusive manner possible. Many connecting areas fall along assembly joints, or will be hidden from view, despite them not really being a problem anyway. Eduard has mastered the easy to remove system for casting blocks, with only those two bulkhead parts having blocks which will require some substantial effort to remove. Many parts are also quit e fragile-looking, such as various pipes etc, and again we see these parts cast in the darker grey resin, which perhaps is a little different and more resilient to being handled. No flaw can be found anywhere, such as breakages, bubbles or short cast. This is as good as it can possibly get. Photo Etch There are two PE frets in this set, with one being colour-printed, and the other in bare brass. The colour fret contains the seatbelt set which is composed of belts and separate buckles. I think I prefer the textile belts to these though, for a more realistic effect and weathering possibilities. The second fret holds the various instrument panel layers, with neatly etched bezels. A series of levers are included too, as well as pedal adjustment ratchets and various brackets. Etch quality is excellent, and small connecting points mean parts will be easy to remove from the fret. Instructions There is a LOT of work involved in assembling this, and an even bigger job in painting it, but that is fun, right? There's no doubt that Eduard have done an admirable job in presenting the various constructional sequences with relative clarity. Newly attached parts are shown in blue ink, whilst any surgery required to the host kit, is inked in red. There is indeed some surgery to perform, but this seems to be limited to the removal of the moulded structures (frames) within the cockpit, and no actual wall thinning is required. This should be a relatively easy project to install within the plastic. Colour reference codes are supplied for Mr Hobby paints, throughout construction. A useful parts map, with part numbers, is supplied on the rear page of the manual. To complete the cockpit assembly, you will need a little lead, tin or copper wire for various tasks. Conclusion In the UK, you can buy this set for £30 to £35, and whilst the Tamiya kit itself can be bought for around £90 to £95 (cheaper from Lucky Model etc), it seems like quite a high proportion of cost to spend on just the cockpit. Having said that, the sheer number of parts in this set, and how thorough it is, for me, is a perfect reason to do so. It seems incredulous that you could improve the Tamiya kit parts to such an extent that you'd scrap them completely, but this is exactly what this set provides, at the same time, offering a mammoth leap in detail over the original. For me, this set is a MUST! Very highly recommended My sincere thanks to Eduard for the review sample seen here. To purchase directly, click THIS link. James H
  5. The de Havilland Vampire WZ507 is well known to the British air show scene, a rare cold war jet fighter preserved and flown by the Vampire Preservation Group, based at North Weald airfield. This interactive cockpit panorama has been created for the Vampire website - it's enormously expensive to keep such an old warbird flying, and the panorama is meant to attract visitors to the Vampire website, join their Supporter's Club, or even become shareholders. Click on the photo below to open the panorama, and switch to full screen mode! If you are interested in future aircraft panoramas, please sign up to my mailing list! A bit more about the panorama can be found here. Next to come are a Tiger Moth, and complete virtual tour of one of the iconic WWII bombers. If you can think of an aircraft that could benefit from such work, please let me know!
  6. 1:32 F4U-1 cockpit Eduard 'Brassin' Catalogue # 632039 Available from Eduard for €41,25 Bunny Fighter Club price: €35,06 I'm actually quite surprised that it's taken Eduard so long to release a complete cockpit upgrade for the recent(ish) 1:32 Tamiys F4U-1 Corsair, especially with the bubble-canopy F4U-1A just around the corner. Still, it's probably true to say that the F4U-1 'Birdcage' will stay popular for a long time. Having seen the kit itself, and knowing the level of detail within the cockpit, it may seem surprising that a whole resin replacement is now available, but just wait until you see this! You really won't want to build that kit without first seeing the detail that this upgrade offers. Eduard have used their satin black cardboard package for this release, and before you open it, you can feel that it's quite weighty. When opened, you'll see that part of that weight are the four, double sided and folded instruction sheets required for this project, followed by SIX bags of resin which is cast in a combination of light grey, mid grey and clear, plus a small wallet with two PE frets and an instrument panel decal. Two casting blocks are packaged within the main box, un-bagged due to their delicate nature. The resin parts are protected within the box by pieces of soft grey foam, and the instructions are wrapped around these for extra security. This is going to be no quick project, and the FOURTY-NINE pieces of resin and around SIXTY photo-etch parts, are testimony to that. Strangely enough, I'm attracted to the bag with the two largest parts first, plus those loose parts: Eduard appear to use the darker resin for the thinner components, and here, these are the deeply curved floor and the upper side walls which are attached at a late stage in construction. Light grey resin is used for the forward and rear bulkheads. The detail within these key areas is stunning, with plenty of subtle detail hiding around the key structures and avionics/pipework/cabling. I have to say that some carefully applied washes and dry brushing will bring levels of detail out that would normally be overshadowed by the larger cockpit components. Holding the various parts together, you can see that a lot of effort has been made in ensuring that detail areas, such as constructional elements, line up perfectly, as was seen in the 1:48 Spitfire Mk.IX cockpit replacement set. There are a number of minor webs on the cockpit floor, underneath cabling and pipes, and this will need careful trimming away. This goes for the main, central web in the floor too. These thinner, fragile parts are connected to their casting blocks via thin resin walls which look easy to remove and clean up. You will fine smoothly recessed areas on the sidewalls into which the side consoles will neatly fit, so there will be no guesswork here. A number of avionics boxes and cabling are included too. The main, light grey components for the bulkheads are a detail painters dream; especially the forward bulkhead with its mass of pipes, wiring, junction boxes etc. My only real criticism of these parts are the quite thick casting blocks which will need some elbow-grease to remove and clean up. This is a very complex set and one which will bore the pants off you if I describe every single piece (many of which I couldn't' even put a name to), so from here, let's take a look at this bag by bag, with photos, using captions where appropriate. I will also highlight anything which I think you should be aware of. Wallet 2 Wallet 3 Wallet 4 Here we can see that Eduard have given the choice of two different instrument panels. A full resin part is supplied, including cast instrument detail. Those instruments also have dial detail, so unless you're into dry brushing and micro-detail painting, you might prefer the other option. That second option is a resin panel with only a minor amount of cast detail. A first layer of PE is then applied, and then the instrument decal. Finally, a PE fascia is overlaid to complete the panel. This will be painted, and onto this you will lay the instrument decal before then applying the fascia. In an unusual move, this fascia panel is supplied as base brass, and is not colour-printed. Wallet 5 Wallet 6 All resin parts have been thoughtfully connected to their casting blocks in the least obtrusive manner possible. Many connecting areas fall along assembly joints, or will be hidden from view, despite them not really being a problem anyway. Eduard has mastered the easy to remove system for casting blocks, with only those two bulkhead parts having blocks which will require some substantial effort to remove. Many parts are also quit e fragile-looking, such as various pipes etc, and again we see these parts cast in the darker grey resin, which perhaps is a little different and more resilient to being handled. No flaw can be found anywhere, such as breakages, bubbles or short cast. This is as good as it can possibly get. Photo Etch There are two PE frets in this set, with one being colour-printed, and the other in bare brass. The colour fret contains the seatbelt set which is composed of belts and separate buckles. I think I prefer the textile belts to these though, for a more realistic effect and weathering possibilities. The second fret holds the various instrument panel layers, with neatly etched bezels. A series of levers are included too, as well as pedal adjustment ratchets and various brackets. Etch quality is excellent, and small connecting points mean parts will be easy to remove from the fret. Instructions There is a LOT of work involved in assembling this, and an even bigger job in painting it, but that is fun, right? There's no doubt that Eduard have done an admirable job in presenting the various constructional sequences with relative clarity. Newly attached parts are shown in blue ink, whilst any surgery required to the host kit, is inked in red. There is indeed some surgery to perform, but this seems to be limited to the removal of the moulded structures (frames) within the cockpit, and no actual wall thinning is required. This should be a relatively easy project to install within the plastic. Colour reference codes are supplied for Mr Hobby paints, throughout construction. A useful parts map, with part numbers, is supplied on the rear page of the manual. To complete the cockpit assembly, you will need a little lead, tin or copper wire for various tasks. Conclusion In the UK, you can buy this set for £30 to £35, and whilst the Tamiya kit itself can be bought for around £90 to £95 (cheaper from Lucky Model etc), it seems like quite a high proportion of cost to spend on just the cockpit. Having said that, the sheer number of parts in this set, and how thorough it is, for me, is a perfect reason to do so. It seems incredulous that you could improve the Tamiya kit parts to such an extent that you'd scrap them completely, but this is exactly what this set provides, at the same time, offering a mammoth leap in detail over the original. For me, this set is a MUST! Very highly recommended My sincere thanks to Eduard for the review sample seen here. To purchase directly, click THIS link. James H
  7. For a client, the highly recommended Tangmere Military Aviation Museum near Chichester, I have created a high resolution interactive cockpit panorama of their English Electric Lightning F.53, ZF578. The panorama has two parts - a daylight view, and a night view, with the cockpit light for the instruments switched on. Please use the "virtual switch" on the top left to toggle daylight! In the daylight panorama, all controls, instruments, and switches are explained. Unfortunately, this does not work on touchscreen devices. The panorama was shot inside a museum's hangar, using only available light. Click on the photo below to open the panorama, and switch to full screen mode! Night view: If you are interested in future aircraft panoramas, please sign up to my mailing list! A bit more about the panorama can be found here. More aircraft are lined up for 2015. If you can think of an aircraft that could benefit from such work, please let me know!
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