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Found 6 results

  1. 1:32 Dutch Gloster Meteor F.Mk.4/T.Mk.7 LSK ®NethAF. Decals Dutch Decal Catalogue # 32023 Available from Dutch Decal for €14 For years Dutch Decals has made a niche for themselves in providing decals (among other things) for aircraft used by the Koninklijke Luchtmacht or KLu (Royal Netherlands Air Force). Apart from the national Dutch aviation industry such as Fokker, Koolhoven, many types from different international manufacturers were used. As a result there is a large pool of colour schemes worn by many different aircraft types to choose from. Mainly aimed at the Dutch market, however if you are interested in a Dutch livery this brand is usually where you end up. With the recent release of the HK Models Meteor F4 they have thoughtfully provided a comprehensive decal sheet. Not surprisingly these cover a large number of Dutch operated Gloster Meteors. What do you get? Two decal sheets in A5 format in a re-sealable clear plastic bag. One sheet carries the individual identities of the various Meteors. The second sheet is completely devoted to the airframes stencils. The HK Models kit does have a number of these stencils but the Dutch Decal sheet is in a whole different league. A fold-out A3 format instruction sheet complements the set. These show colour artwork of the available liveries as well as detailed information where to place the decals. This is indeed one of the most comprehensive sheets by this manufacturer. The artwork is first class and clearly show the different liveries used in Dutch service. Most options are for the inevitable high speed silver scheme. Some would call that boring, but for the Meteor this really accentuates the type’s classic lines. The high speed silver is not a natural metal exterior but the whole airframe was sprayed a silver colour. Later in service the meteors were sprayed in grey/green camouflage. Some liveries are for a target towing or photoreconnaissance version. The target towing version had the yellow and diagonal black striped undersides similar to the RAF-version. These are strikingly colourful so there is much to choose from. The instruction sheet also has some very useful photographs showing that parts of the cockpit were interior green as opposed to all black. The photographs were taken from a preserved F4 at Soesterberg. Of course preserved aircraft can be misleading so check your refererences. Stencils The separate stencil sheet is fantastic and worth buying this set for, even if you are not into Dutch Meteors. Due to the large number of small decals you really have to work in an orderly fashion otherwise you cannot see the forest through the trees (Dutch saying). It took Cees five evenings of work to get them all on. They are all in English (apart from the stencil for the T7, which is in Dutch). They are also perfectly legible which is nice. Beware of the instructions Be careful though as there are some mistakes such as misnumbered stencils. The datum stencils are especially tricky as there a more of them indicated on the instruction sheet as there are decals. Luuk Boerman told LSM that the instructions are at fault. Looking at the horizontal tail it indeed looks like a datum stencil frenzy. Luuk also mentioned that information about the stencils was not complete. Thus only the stencils for fuselage and upper surfaces of the wing and tail surfaces are provided. You won’t find any decals for the undersurfaces. Some of the decals are for the fuselage tanks. On the HK Models kit there are no filler details here. Again, check your references. Exercise Cupola Some options are for operational meteors used during Western Union Air Defence Excersise “Cupola”. This was held between august 25th and august 27th 1950. This was the first largescale cooperation between the airforces of Britain, America, France, Belgium and the Netherlands. Its aim was to test the detecting, identifying and tracking of enemy aircraft and directing fighters to their interception. During this exercise the noses of participating Meteors were painted red. Some already carried red nosecaps and tail acorns as squadron colours. For this exercise the area on the nose was extended to roughly in line with the front edge of the nosewheelbay. Shape of things to come Surprisingly one of the options is for a Meteor T7 trainer. It is hoped that Fisher Model and Pattern will provide a resin conversion set. Quality One of the options was used by Cees Broere on his HK Models Meteor. The decals are very well printed in good register. Colour density is also very good. There is a limited amount of decal film overlap. This completely disappears using the Micorscale Set and Sol system and a coat of varnish. It is advised to cut as much excess film away with scissors to reduce the risk of silvering. The decals only need a few seconds of immersion in luke warm water and they slide off easily. They are very strong and can stand some handling. Especially in the case where after five minutes Cees noticed that the large roundels were upside down. Using a brush with a lot of water they were lifted off without any damage. Be careful in using the set/sol solutions as the white was affected. But it could be too much of the solution applied. So be careful here. Conclusion? A very welcome sheet. Even if a Dutch Meteor is not to your liking, the separate sheet with airframe stencils is worth buying for that alone. Highly recommended. Available directly from Dutch Decal, the Aviaton Hobby Shop or Hannants Cees Broere en Jeroen Peters
  2. Dutch Decal DD32015 F-104G RNLAF 312 Sqn "Dusty 3000 Hrs" Graffiti Price €12.95 including VAT at the Dutch resellers of Dutch Decal; see here: http://www.dutchdecal.nl/where-to-get If you really, REALLY want to have a different looking F-104G Starfighter in your collection, finish it with this decal sheet! It does need the original F-104G sheet DD32014 for the rosettes, emblems and stencilling though. A review of that decalsheet can be found here: http://forum.largescalemodeller.com/topic/1746-dutch-decal-dd-32014-f-104g-starfighter/#entry24374 In December 1982, F-104G D-8337 of 312 Sqn, Volkel Airbase had logged 3000 hours. This happy occasion inspired the squadron techies to improve somewhat on the serious Teutonic standard camouflage of the Starfighter... As a bonus there is also the tail art "Mirror Image" - a nude lady appearing out of a cloud- that appeared on 311 Sqn F-104G D-8063, also in 1982. The tail number is also supplied. The printing looks very good. Sharp isn't really the right word with graffiti like this! The decalfilm looks to be quite thin so should pose no problems on the model. Because of the large "art"work there is plenty of decalfilm however, so be sure to really gloss coat your model to avoid any chance of silvering. This sheet really is a hoot! Thanks to Dutch Decal for providing the review sample. Very Highly Recommended! Erik Bosch
  3. Dutch Decal DD 32014 F-104G Starfighter Available directly from Dutch Decal here: http://www.dutchdecal.nl/where-to-get for €15 A little history: The Royal Netherlands Air Force received its first F-104 on the 12th of December 1962. That day the D-8013 and D-8022 were handed over to 306 Squadron at Twenthe Air Base. In total the Klu received 138 F-104's; 18 TF-104G’s, 18 RF-104G’s and 102 F-104G’s. Later 10 F-104G’s were converted to RF-104G but received no internal photo reconnaissance systems but only the Orpheuspod (from The Oude Delft Optical Systems in conjunction with Fokker), which also replaced the internal reccesystem of the original RF-104G’s. 25 F-104’s had been delivered under the Militairy Assistance Program (MAP) and were built by Fiat in Turin, Italy. These F-104’s could be easily recognized by their serial number beginning with D-66.. Five operational squadrons flew with the 104 namely 306 squadron; from December 1962 till February 1983 in the tactical reconnaissance role, 311 squadron, from March 1965 till August 1982, and 312 squadron, from October 1965 till June 1984, in the fighter bomber role from Volkel Air Base. 322 and 323 Squadron used their Starfighters in the air defense role from August 1963 till 1980. There were also some conversion units in the KLu flying mainly with TF-104G. The first conversion unit was the “Dutch Masters” stationed at Twente Air Base but this unit was decommissioned on January 1st 1969. The TF-104G’s were then assigned to the “TCA”(Training en Conversie Afdeling) at Leeuwarden and “CAV” (Conversie Afdeling Volkel) at of course Volkel. On March 15th 1978, after the last Starfighter conversion had taken place at Leeuwarden, the TCA was the first unit which retired the 104. On 16th May 1979 645 Squadron was founded. This squadron received some Starfighters and would be flying with them until 322 and 323 were operational on the F-16. The remaining F-104’s were transferred to Volkel. Turkey was interested to buy 25 surplus F-104’s from the KLu and they were delivered on 25th August 1980(12), 15th December 1980(11) and the final 2 in 1982. Meanwhile the US decided that the remaining 16 under the MAP delivered F-104's had to be transferred to Greece (10) and Turkey (6). The Greek Starfighters were deliverd on 7th May 1982(4) and 23th June 1982. Meanwhile Volkel was in the middle of it's F-16 conversion, the first Squadron to receive F-16 was 311 which transferred al their F-104’s to 312 squadron which had at that time 40 F-104's. In February 1984 the final RF-104G flight was made so the KLu had a great surplus of 104’s. Turkey was interested in buying an extra 23 Starfighters. But only 22 were handed over because the D-8103 crashed before having been handed over to the TuAF. On 30th November 1983 a remarkable delivery flight took place, that day 13 (T)F-104G were flown to Turkey but only 11 made the delivery flight. The D-8052 crashed an hour after take off and the D-5807 crashed while on approach to Izmir (Turkey). On June 1st 1984, the last 104 squadron converted to the F-16 and a final but never official squadron was founded, the UFO flight (Uitfaserings onderdeel). Pilots who were not converted yet on the F-16 could stay current on jets. But on 21th November 1984 it was al over. That day the D-5803,D-5810,D-5804,D-8258 and D-8256 made a final flight along al the KLu Airbases. In 22 years the Klu flew 345.500 hours with the F-104 with the loss of 40 aircraft. The sight and sound of this great aircraft is still missed... (Text http://www.afterburner.nl/f104.htm) Although this decalset isn't exactly new; the prospect of having the 1/32 Italeri F-104G makes it quite relevant to have a look at the set. With this sheet you can build almost any (T)F-104G as flown in the Royal Netherlands Air Force, except for two units. The badge of the first OCU for the F-104G, "The Dutch Masters" operating from Twente Airbase is missing. (copyright http://www.klu-inkleur.nl/) Also missing is the early (round white base) and late (triangular orange base) emblem of the TCA -Traings- en Conversie Afdeling; Training and Conversion Unit Leeuwarden. The subject of that emblem was "Meneer de Uil" (Mr. Owl), the anchor"man" of the children's series "Fable News" which brought everyday human problems to children in a playful way through the animal inhabitants of "The Big Animal Forest". But let's not digress... The D-5815 with which my father had a heavy barrier engagement in 1970 as a result of which the aircraft had to be repaired at the Avio-Diepen facility. Note the early TCA badge... Back to the decal sheet; on the beautiful colour instructions there are 13 examples of (T)F-104G schemes. The variety of markings is outstanding. - A natural metal Luftwaffe F-104G built by Fokker was "hijacked", the German crosses were masked off and Dutch rosettes added for the press because at the time there weren't enough "real Dutch" 104's available... - A few (T)F-104G's in the early scheme of light grey. - A 311 Sqn 104 in camouflage with a replacement tail cone from rival 312 Sqn. Of course a 311 badge was duly added to the front fuselage! - A 312 Sqn "Agressor" with white top wings and airbrakes. - A 322 Sqn 104 with Dayglo orange tiptanks and dummy Sidewinders. - A 306 Recce Sqn 104 with AC tail-code; presumably for a Tactical Air Meet. - The F-104G Solo Display from Captain Hans van der Werff with a happy sharkmouth. - And lastly a couple of F-104's from the UFO; the Uitfaserings Onderdeel (Phasing Out Unit), the unit with which the pilots who hadn't yet converted or wouldn't convert to the F-16A could stay current on a jet. The decalsheet also contains the stencilling pertinent for Dutch F-104G's The decals themselves are printed on two sheets; one for the rosettes, the stencilling and the squadron-badges and one for the black codes. The decals are sharply printed, in register and true of colour. The decalfilm is nicely thin. I'm looking forward to use these decals when the 1/32 Italeri F-104G hits the shelves. Very Highly Recommended Erik Bosch.
  4. Been playing a little with my new studio lights and selected the 1/32 Spitfire built by Luuk from Dutch Decal as the victim! JPG's straight from the camera, no tweaking. I'm not completely satisfied with the results yet. But enough about photographing; on to the model:
  5. 1:32 PBY-5(A) Catalina Marine Luchtvaart Dienst / Royal Netherlands Naval Air Service Limited Run Manufacturer: Dutch Decal Catalogue # 32020 Available from Dutch Decal: www.dutchdecal.nl Let's start this review with our standard lines about Dutch Decal: Celebrating their 25th birthday, Dutch Decal has been around since 1986. It is run by the Dutch graphic designer Luuk Boerman and has been producing decal sheets of aircraft from all Dutch armed forces. Every now and then a foreign nationality slips through. More than 100 sheets have been released to date. Most of them are sold out now but a few much requested sheets will be reprinted in the near future depending on demand. The decal sheets are silkscreen printed and accompanied by English instructions. Dutch Decal sheets come in all scales: 1:72, 1:48 and 1:32. The 1:32 sheets can be identified by the broad black band at the bottom of the packaging. Let´s have a look what we get: Packed in the usual plastic zip lock bag is one sheet of decals, a booklet showing the four versions that can be chosen from and one paper template. More about that later. A close look at the decal sheet itself reveals a very nice register and sharp, crisp detail. The four versions the modeler can choose from are: • Consolidated PBY-5, Y-45, No 321 Squadron Royal Netherlands Naval Air Service, Rose Bay Australia, 1943 • Consolidated PBY-5A, Y-75, No 321 Squadron Royal Netherlands Naval Air Service, 1941 • Consolidated PBY-5, Y-69, No 321 Squadron Royal Netherlands Naval Air Service, Australia, 1942 • Consolidated PBY-5A, K/Y-75, No 321 Squadron Royal Netherlands Naval Air Service, RAAF Ceylon (VIP Transport), Ceylon, 1943 • Consolidated PBY-5A, P-85, No 7 Squadron Royal Netherlands Naval Air Service, Dutch New Guinea, 1947 Needless to say, this sheet is intended for the HPH models Catalina A little intro: During the dutch colonial reign the need for flying boats was evident. The dutch indies cover almost 2 million square KM and consist out of thousands of scattered islands. The dutch navy used several flying boats in their struggle to protect the dutch interests. Two that stand out are the Dornier 24 and the Catalina. Whereas the Do24 was mainly used for transport missions, the Cats also performed missions like: bomb runs, mine dropping and providing air cover for ships. During the war (after the japanese took over the dutch indies) dutch Catalina crews formed two Catalina squadrons with the Royal Air Force and the Fleet Air Arm. Only a small number of Catalina planes survived the escape from japanese forces. They performed missions during the rest of the war from Australia and Ceylon (Sri Lanka). So, If you're looking to build a Catalina in more exotic markings, and heavily weathered Pacific Theatre look, this might be it for you. Paper template: A paper template is provided to cut the masks for the huge orange triangles and background for the dutch flags. This will prove much easier than laying these on with decals. Consolidated PBY-5, Y-45 This specific plane has some stories to tell. Entered service in 1940 and performed recon missions from Ambon. In 1942 it was transferred to Soerabaja and performed fleet protection missions. During one of these missions the Y-45 made the headlines by rescuing 79 souls!! You don't believe it? Here's a pic: After escaping in march 1942 from japanese forces the Y-45 struck a reef and was pulled on land by 100 locals. Here it was made-do mended with… cement! After these repairs the Y-45 finally reached the safety of Australia in Freemantle. The rest of the war the Y-45 performed clandestine secret service missions and at the end of the war this plane was the first to drop food over the starving population of Java. Here's a pic of the crest on the nose of the Y-45: Consolidated PBY-5A, Y-75 This particular plane was a little less 'fortunate'. While in service with the 321 squadron hit a reef in 1943 and sunk immediately. The crew managed to get out in time. The plane was however raised and it took a total of 5 months to fully repair it again. A tough job, since the salt water had eaten away at the wiring. After it was restored the Y-75 was transformed to a passenger plane, meant to transport high officials over long distances. The Y-75 was therefor nicknamed 'Skysleeper'. Here's a pic of the Skysleeper. 4th man from the left is A.V.M. Sir Alan Leeds: Consolidated PBY-5, Y-69 After the Pearl Harbour attack the Y-69 was confiscated by the americans and returned to the dutch after the war. I was not able to dig up much more interesting facts about this plane, except some photo's of the Y-69 during repairs. These photo's (www.maritiemdigitaal.nl) show the heavily weathered appearance. Here are some pics of the Y-69: Consolidated PBY-5A, P-85 This plane entered dutch service on 20-11-1942. It survived the war and in 1953 it was re-numbered to P-219. In 1954 it was destroyed in a fire on Biak. The P-85: Conclusion: As we have come to expect from Dutch Decal, the research is well done and the artwork is on the mark. This sheet is available directly from Dutch Decal or the Aviation Mega Store. It's a limited run edition, so If you want it get it while you can. Highly recommended Cees Broere and Jeroen Peters Our sincere thanks to Dutch Decals´Luuk Boerman for providing the review sample used here. Reference used: • http://www.maritiemdigitaal.nl • http://kw.jonker.co/
  6. 1:32 B-25J Mitchell No. 16 and 18 NEI Bomber Squadron ML-KNIL/RNEIAAF Limited Run Manufacturer: Dutch Decal Catalogue # 32012 Available from Dutch Decal: www.dutchdecal.nl Celebrating their 25th birthday, Dutch Decal has been around since 1986. It is run by the Dutch graphic designer Luuk Boerman and has been producing decal sheets of aircraft from all Dutch armed forces. Every now and then a foreign nationality slips through. More than 100 sheets have been released to date. Most of them are sold out now but a few much requested sheets will be reprinted in the near future depending on demand. The decal sheets are silkscreen printed and accompanied by English instructions. Dutch Decal sheets come in all scales: 1:72, 1:48 and 1:32. The 1:32 sheets can be identified by the broad black band at the bottom of the packaging. Let´s have a look what we get: In a well packed zipped plastic bag you will find one sheet of decals protected by a folded colourful sheet of paper. On here you will find the various schemes for Dutch B-25J Mitchells. All of these subjects operated in the former Dutch East Indies by the ML KNIL (Militaire Luchtvaart/ Koninklijk Nederlands Indisch Leger) or RNEIAAF (Royal Netherlands East Indies Army Air Force). As you may have guessed this sheet is to be used with the HK Models B-25J model kit. At the time of conception of this sheet it was planned to be used with the Wingscale B-25J kit. Luuk Boerman was co-operating with Wingscale at the time. The Wingscale logo on the booklet proves this. The decals are well printed and register is perfect on our sample, there is no mismatch. The finish is gloss. Covered liveries: The various scheme options are olive drab with grey undersides, The sheet give the Federal Standard numbers as FS34088 for Olive drab and FS36173 for Neutral Grey. Other aircraft have partly removed paint exposing the natural metal finish. And some aircraft in natural metal finish overall. Very dark blue paint: What struck us was the dark tone of blue used in the Dutch nationality roundel. This is very dark, at first we thought this was a misprint. After pointing this out to Dutch Decal, Luuk informed us that this actually is correct. The Dutch roundels were applied at the North American factory where they simply used the same blue paint to apply the American star and bar. Dutch nationality markings: In the colour artwork it can clearly be seen that the former American star and bars have been painted out with a darker colour of green. Over this the Dutch flags were applied. Some had these flags bordered in white to make them better stand out to the population below. The wartime Dutch nationality marking is the black bordered orange triangle. These were removed for service in the Pacific Theatre of Operations because it was felt they resembled the Japanese “meatball” too much. To avoid confusion the Dutch flag was used. After 1947 the flags were replaced by the current tricoloured roundel with the orange dot. Dorsal turret deleted: Also note that only N5 245 carries the dorsal turret just after the cockpit, the others have the turret removed and the hole faired over. This was because after the cease of hostilities there was no Japanese threat and these were deleted. Only N5 245 on this sheet was used during the war, the others post war. Weathered camouflage: It is obvious that these aircraft were worked hard and the paintwork suffered heavily in the hot humid climate. If you like exotic subjects and go to town on heavily weathered liveries then this sheet is right up your alley. The sheet covers 7 individual aircraft: • NA B-25J Mitchell N5-245 “Lienke” No. 18 NEI Bomber Squadron, Royal Neth. East Indies Army AF. Batchelor AB Australia 1945 • NA B-25J Mitchell N5-246 No. 18 NEI Bomber Squadron, Royal Neth. East Indies Army AF. Tjililitan 1st AB Batavia Java Dutch East Indies 1947 (See photo below. Source: See reference) • NA B-25J Mitchell N5-257 No. 16 NEI Bomber Squadron, Royal Neth. East Indies Army AF. Talang Betoetoe 12th AB Palembang Sumatra Dutch East Indies 1947 (See photo below. Source: See reference) • NA B-25J Mitchell N5-264 No. 16 NEI Bomber Squadron, Royal Neth. East Indies Army AF. Talang Betoetoe 12th AB Palembang Sumatra Dutch East Indies 1946-1948. This machine was returned to the Netherlands during 1971 after an official request by HRH Prince Bernhard and is on display at the Military Aviation Museum, Soesterberg. • NA B-25J Mitchell N5-258 No. 16 NEI Bomber Squadron, Royal Neth. East Indies Army AF. Talang Betoetoe 12th AB Palembang Sumatra Dutch East Indies 1946-1948 • NA B-25J Mitchell M4 34. No. 18 NEI Bomber Squadron, Royal Neth. East Indies Army AF. Tjililitan 1st AB Batavia Java Dutch East Indies 1947-1948 • NA B-25J Mitchell M4 51 No. 18 NEI Bomber Squadron, Royal Neth. East Indies Army AF. Tjililitan 1st AB Batavia Java Dutch East Indies 1947-1948 (See photo below. Source: See reference) • NA B-25J Mitchell M-434. No. 16 or 18 NEI Bomber Squadron, Royal Neth. East Indies Army AF. Dutch East Indies 1948 Conclusion: The overall quality and accurancy is spot on. Using our reference we could not find any faults. We tried, honestly. This sheet is available directly from Dutch Decal or the Aviation Mega Store. It's a limited run edition, so If you want it get it while you can. Highly recommended Cees Broere and Jeroen Peters Our sincere thanks to Dutch Decals´Luuk Boerman for providing the review sample used here. Reference used: De nederlandse Mitchells by Gerben J. Tornij ISBN nr 90-9013058-6 This book covers the operational service of the Mitchell in the Dutch airforce
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