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Found 15 results

  1. 1/32 de Havilland Mosquito B Mk. IX / B Mk.XVI Hong Kong Models Catalogue # HK01E16 Available from MJR Hobbies for £139.50 The Mosquito was probably one of the RAF’s most versatile aircraft designs, and indeed, an aircraft that we may never have had at all if it wasn’t for the perseverance of its designer, Geoffrey de Havilland. It was actually the simplicity of de Havilland’s design that could well have seen the project being stillborn. To meet Air Ministry requirements for a high-speed bomber, de Havilland proposed a new airframe, composed mainly of non-strategic materials, and powered by twin Rolls Royce Merlin engines. Unlike designs which were submitted by other manufacturers, de Havilland envisaged that his machine would be fast enough to be totally unarmed, and with a smooth, aerodynamic exterior. For the Air Ministry, this perhaps seemed a little too much like a flight of fancy, and de Havilland was asked to simply act as a contractor for designs from other manufacturers. Undeterred, Geoffrey de Havilland took on his design under a private venture arrangement, using a small design team led by Eric Bishop, and work began under strict secrecy at Salisbury Hall, Hertfordshire, in October 1939. The aircraft was to be designated ‘DH.98’. Even though de Havilland’s proposal was for an unarmed bomber, his team created a design, which would allow the installation of four, forward firing cannon that would sit in the forward belly of the aircraft, and fire through blast tubes. With the war now in full swing, and changes in Air Ministry requirements, which saw a general acceptance of the DH.98 for a reconnaissance role, a full size mock-up was inspected by the Air Ministry in December 1939; only 2 months after the project began in secrecy. The foot was now firmly in the doors, and from this point, the Air Ministry made demands of the DH.98 which saw it being developed for a high-speed bomber and also fighter role. The Mosquito, as it soon came to be known, was one of the most versatile airframes in frontline service, with it eventually being used for roles such as night-fighter, long-range fighter, photo-recon, fast bomber, and maritime strike aircraft. No potted history of the Mosquito can be complete without a few words about its construction. The main airframe itself was composed of wood, with the fuselage being formed over a concrete buck, as halves, using a sandwich of balsa in between birch layers. These rigid shells required no internal framework, and once fitted out, were glued together and strengthened by simple bulkheads. The wings were also all-wood, being constructed from spruce and plywood, mainly. This highly successful design was also operated by the US, as well as Canada, Australia, China, France and New Zealand etc. and nearly 8000 had been built by the time production ceased in 1950. The kit This is of course HKM’s second incarnation of the Mosquito, with this particular kit version, the Mk.IX and Mk.XVI differing from the original release, mainly due to being fitted with the two-stage Merlin engine. This B Mk.IX was derived from the PR Mk.IX machine, and there are parts in this kit, albeit unused, for such a machine. I’m pretty sure that type could be cobbled together with relative ease. There are TWENTY-FOUR sprues of light grey styrene, all individually wrapped, a further THREE slide moulded main parts (wing, forward fuse, rear fuse), and THREE sprues of clear styrene. If you like a nice part’s count, despite some of the single piece parts included, then you won’t be disappointed. A total of 375 plastic parts are included, with options for both standard and bulged (cookie/blockbuster) bomb bay. These are supplemented by TWO frets of PE parts, and a single decal sheet from Cartograf. Tomek Wajnkaim’s atmospheric box art is superb and would certainly catch my eye if I was in the local hobby store. At this point, I do have to state that I have had an input on this kit, as with the previous Mosquito release, and this extends to a few design touches and also work on the manual. My extended team at LSM has also contributed with the box art and box design, instruction illustration and decals. The box carries the LSM logo too, stating our input. I don’t want anyone to be of the impression that I will write my article based on something I hadn’t declared. This kit, as with any other, isn’t perfect. No doubt about that. I will also state from the outset that there has been no re-tooling of either the wing (intake shape), or the nose section. These remain the same as the original release, along with any respective clear parts. For an review of the previous release, take a look at Jason Gill’s article HERE. Ok, onto business. Many a paragraph has been written about the previous release, both in modelling communities and on social media. Instead of doing an entire review for this new kit, I’ll do an overview, and describe the differences that are to be found with the B Mk.IX and B Mk.XVI. This is perhaps the first kit where I have seen slide moulding being used so widely, and for main parts. A full span wing is included again, and this incorporates both the upper and lower panels as a single piece. That’s certainly a very advanced way of using slide moulding, and definitely the most impressive. All there is to do to complete the basic wing structure is to add the trailing edge spars and wingtips. As far as clean-up goes, a faint moulding line exists around the leading edge, and that’s it. A few swipes with a sanding sponge, and its history. Wing detail is excellent, with not only the various filler and access panel details on the underside (remember that this was a wooden-skinned wing), but also the extremely fine laser-etched wing panel tapes. You’ll need to tread carefully with paint, or these will disappear. HK has also moulded the stabiliser as a full span part, with the same sort of trailing edge spar insert. In fact, all of the control surfaces and fin are also hollow and have a simple mould seam to remove only. I did say that slide-moulding was extensive. Surface detail on these parts is limited, by very nature, but what there is, is beautifully rendered. With the wing being a single part, if you wish to fit the underwing tanks, you will need to actually mark the locations yourself, and then drill holes. A plan is included to show you exactly how to do this. When you open the box, it’s hard to ignore the two fuselage sections, moulded as front and rear, and connected along the fuselage stiffening joint that runs circumferentially around this area. This perfectly hides any connection you will make. As with the wing, very faint moulding seams exist, and these will just need a few seconds to eradicate them with a sanding sponge. These parts are very impressive in their execution, with the minimal external details being nicely applied. The cockpit entry door and the equipment port in the lower rear fuse, are separate parts, and the side walls that sit underneath the wing, are also separate. This is to facilitate the fit of the wing to the fuselage, as per the real aircraft. Assembly at this point is not too dissimilar from that in the de Havilland factory! A detailed bomb bay is included, and two different styles of bomb door are available. These are the standard, straight doors, and the bulged doors for the cookie-carrying machine. Front and rear fairings are included for these, and these fit beautifully (speaking from previous experience). Of course, there is a major change in this kit, and that is inclusion of the two-stage Merlin engines. To accommodate these, longer nacelle panels have been included, as well as newly-tooled parts for the upper cowl, that plug into the upper wing. The new engine parts are moulded onto two identical sprues that also hold the longer engine bearers, glycol tank and supercharger etc. Detailed engines are supplied for both nacelles, as are two versions of the propeller. The exhaust sprue is the same as in the previous release, but this time, we build it as a 6 stub version, and not the 5 stub. All new sprues for this release concern the engine area. A total of six newly-tooled sprues account for this part of the build, and help to produce that recognisable nacelle profile. Photo-etch louvres are supplied for the side of the lower intake cowl. As far as I can tell, there are no cockpit changes in this release. Having built this one for the box art model on the previous release, I can say that the cockpit it very nice out of box, but would benefit from Eduard’s detail set, or the Profimodeller PE release. Some lead wire for wiring also wouldn’t go amiss. PE seatbelts are included too, but you might hanker after the textile ones from HGW. You’d have to go a long way to beat those for realism. Looking at the instructions, you are advised to install the bomb bay door actuators around the time you build the cockpit. My advice is NOT to do this, but to wait until the model is more or less complete, otherwise you will bend or snap them whilst handling the Mosquito. In fact, I would attach them after painting, at the same time you fit the bomb bay doors. If you want to see what can be done with the HKM kit, take a look at this link on The Modelling News. Probably one of the finest cockpits I’ve seen, albeit with a lot of dedication from the builder. I quite like the undercarriage on this kit. Looking at the real thing, HK has produced a superb replica, and it does actually articulate when built…..right up until the point where you have to install it to the model. Removing the seams on the wheels is a little tedious, but isn’t it always, unless you fit a nice resin replacement, such as Eduard’s Brassin parts. The undercarriage bays are highly detailed, with nice constructional detail and some wiring/plumping. A little extra wiring would be good to add, but the bays are quite narrow, and vision will be limited. Gear bay doors have the correct internal detail representation. The last newly-tooled sprue in this release concerns the canopy. This sprue holds just two parts which are for the side panels. All clear parts fit around an internal framework, and they do fit just great. Clarity is superb, and the frame lines are nicely defined. I would use Eduard’s masks for this canopy though. When I originally built the prototype, I had no such luxury, and it took hours. There will be a small change in the masks to represent this kit, but nothing too different. Two PE frets are included, with parts for the louvres, intake grilles and seatbelts. There isn’t anything to tax you too much here, and PE quality is very good. If you, like me, want to add some extra detail, then of course it would make sense to change the belts, as previously mentioned. There are three schemes for this release. These are: B Mk.IX, ML897/D, No.1409 Met Flight, Wyton, late 1944 B Mk.IX, LR503/F, No.105 Squadron, Calgary, May 1945 B Mk.XVI, MM199/M5-Q, No.128 Squadron, Wyton, December 1944 A single, large Cartograf-printed decal sheet is included. Printing is superb, with decals being nice and thin, with minimal carrier film, authentic colour, and perfect register. They are also glossy, which is preferable to matt, as I find they conform far more easily. The glossy A4 instruction manual is printed in greyscale, but it easier to follow that the early HK manuals, with shading being used on solid areas. Construction takes place over 44 easy to follow stages, with some sub-stages included. Parts options are clearly shown and paint call-outs are supplied in Gunze, Tamiya and AK codes. This kit is a partnership between AK, LSM and HKM. The latter pages of the manual have profiles for all three schemes, from multiple angles. These are printed greyscale too, and I admit that I would have liked to have seen these in colour. A profile is included for stencil placement too. Conclusion Whilst not a perfect kit (is there one?), I do profess a love for this one, ever since I saw it on the Pocketbond stall at Telford in 2014. That was when I was working with HKM, along with the other LSM team, and I took the prototype home to build for a magazine, and the box art. There is a respectable parts count, some nice engineering, and a finely detailed kit to be had with this release, and no doubt we’ll see more sets released to coincide with this hitting the shelves. Being the B Mk. IX / B Mk.XVI variant, this of course opens up more neat options schemes. I wonder when we’ll see the PR version… My thanks to Hong Kong Models for the sample seen here. To purchase directly, check out your preferred hobby store. In the UK, MJR Hobbies will sell this for £139.50. Click here to hit their page. Completed model of previous HKM Mosquito kit, built by author
  2. Hello, the beauty is finished ... I love the Mosquito as one of the most beautifully shaped airplanes ever.... she has a kind of elegance in her shape ... Kit is from Tamiya in 1/32 with many, many parts, great fit, great quality, great details, great manuals, great ..... a fantastic kit of a huge model! I have added some photo etched parts from Eduard, some new decals for the stencils and markings (Canadian Airforce with beautiful nose art) and some resin parts. Painting was done with Lifecolor-colors mainly, plus AK Interactive. Weathering with oil colors, pigments, ... I hope that you like it! Cheers Micha
  3. Hi all, Time to throw my build into this. The kit is great but I am a sucker for Aftermarket so I bought: 1. Eduard Big Ed Etch Set, 2. Eduard Brassin Wheel Set, 3. Eduard Brassin Exhaust Stacks, 4. Profimodeller Pitot Tube, 5. Some Uschi Plywood Decals (awaiting delivery on those). Going to do the aircraft half bare metal and wood and the other half in a camouflage Im yet to decide upon. So, looking forward to joining the group build and seeing how everyone else does too
  4. So here are the finished pictures: Decals were Uschi van der Rosten WGSF48-C (Fine Veneer Plywood), WGSF48-B "Knotless Birch) and Ho-229 Special Edition (1 of 6). There were more than 160 individual pieces in total. Metallic parts were Vallejo Air Silver, Aluminium & Steel. Eduard belts, radiators & intake mesh. Master Model brass machine gun barrels. Little Lenses in various positions. Acetate reflector gunsight. Lead wire brake pipes. Brass tube pitot head. A bit of scratchbuilding in the cockpit. Apart from that OOB. It's another great Tamiya kit. Build thread here: http://forum.largescalemodeller.com/topic/3821-172-tamiya-mosquito-fb-mk-vi-woodgrain-finish/ Thanks for looking!
  5. So I am ready to start off my new project - Hong Kong Models 1/32 Mosquito B Mk. IV Series II
  6. Hi All, Finally finished the cookie monster! Basically a test shot that misses the fabric patches surface details and didn't include decals. I used Mal's perfect masks for the codes, roundels and No Step indications and also the ProfiModeller stencil decals. These include some typo's and are huge in numbers, but they definitely add some life to the otherwise dull surface of the wooden wonder. I took my time with the weathering part. Using a grey sharp colour pencil for scratches and a silver Prisma pencil for the scratches on aluminium parts, like the cowlings. Overall I'm pleased with the result and love the sleek lines of this machine. At the time I started this kit little after market was available, so limited to the HGW sutton harnesses and ProfiModeller Pitot tube. Ah! And almost forgot. I used Airscale decals for the instrument panel. Cheers! Next!
  7. 1/32 Mosquito Mk.IV Series II HK Models Catalogue No: 01E015 Available from all good model suppliers priced £149.99 Anyone who, like me, saw this kit at Telford 2014 will have been awaiting this kit with baited breath. Well its here and all I can say is Yes, its as good as one hoped and from handling at Telford expected of this release from HK Models. A certain Japanese company has also announced a Mosquito so its soon to have some company but I think it'll stand up to that if only for some of the major assemblies and their quality. More of that later. The kit arrives in a very shiny, nice artwork adorned, large box. Its very impressive and also has something Ive not seen before as it says its made in co-operation with AK Interactive and the one and only Large Scale Modeller. I think this, if nothing else puts HK Models where most modellers want them and thats listening to their customers. This has to be the future and I can only see HK going from strength to strength by doing this. The box is very full, nothing is going to rattle around in here and get damaged, in fact everything is very well wrapped and contained in plastic bags that support and protect the pieces. Also as this is one of the first run of these kits it comes with a little gift from HK Models. A resin crew thats sculpted by Steve Warillow. More on these later in the review. Kit Contents. The box contains the previously mentioned figures, 28 sprues including the clear ones, a sheet of decals, a small etched fret and the instruction booklet. The instruction booklet is also backed up by a one sheet that covers all colours with reference to a number of paint supplier including AK Interactive and Vallejo. This is a great idea as flipping back and forth in the instruction manual to find that colour chart often gets to be a pain, first world problems I know but when a manufacturer puts so much thought into it one has to give them credit. The Sprues Sprue A: Sprue A is the 1st surprise for those who didnt see the Telford moulds. Yes its a single piece nose as a single moulding. Slide moulded and very high standard its really a lovely piece. I really like the fact that there is a very small mould line that needs a quick waft with a snading stick and its ready to go. This has to be the future. Sprue B: Sprue B continues the surprise. Its a whole single piece fuselage. Again beautifully moulded, only needs a quick waft with the sanding stick and all those old worries about getting rid of fuselage seams is gone. Magic. The seam you see on the side is supposed to be there. These were tape lines on the real thing. These have been added to the kit by, once out by laser etching the kit moulds. This is a first and really adds a touch of class to this part, the other fuselage part and parts of the wings. Sprue C: Well as far as single moulds are concerned, HK have kept the best for last. Both wings, straight through the fuselage, as a single moulding with top and underside all as one piece. Amazing. No other words, you just have to see it for yourself and no picture will ever convey how good this is. Sprue D (x2) on left, Sprue E (x2) on right: Sprue D of which there are two are mostly engine, undercarriage and ancillary parts for those lovely merlin engines and the nacelles in which they are kept. Its all up to the standard of the other mouldings, very good, and looks great on the sprue. Sprue E again of which there are two is the bombs and the underwing fuel tanks. Sprue F (x2) on the left and Sprue G (x2): These sprues are a pair of propellers, 2 of each and of different types. In the instructions G are the ones used and F is for a later release. There are also some smaller nacelle parts here. Sprue H: Sprue H has the Merlin engine nacelles, control surfaces for both wings and tail and some panels for those 1 part wings. Its one of the largest single sprues in the kit. Sprue K: Sprues K and L are more parts to finish of those lovely wings. Sprue M: Sprue M is mostly cockpit parts. What surprises here is the cockpit frame. Its a single piece and has no glass in it, its actually the internal roll cage on the real thing and is a nice touch here. This looks like a great idea and the glass parts are added later so will make painting the roll cage easier and potentially make painting the seperate clear part frames easier too. Sprue N: Sprue N contains more parts to finish off the fuselage itself. Sprue P (x2): Sprue P is the very large (Big Boy?) bomb. Sprue Q (x2): Again more fuselage parts for the engine nacelles. Sprue S: This contains panels for the nacelle sides Sprue T: Sprue T is another sprue with more tail components and some contents of the engine nacelles. Sprues U, V, W and X These are the clear glass components and are primarily for the cockpit, though there are some wingtip anti-collision lights too. Sprue Y: Sprue Y has the exhaust stacks for those 2 merlin engines. Theyre very fine and included hollow ends which should look great under a coat of paint. Sprue Z: This is the final sprue and has the bomb bay doors (there are bulged and non-bulged in this kit depending on the bomb payload) and some of the bomb bay actuator parts. Etched Fret: The single, small etched fret contains the seat straps for both the pilot and co-pilot/bomb aimer. These have great detail in them, sadly for now you'll have to take my word for it as I photgraphed the back, not the detailed front, of them. Doh!!! Decals: The Decals are on one very large sheet, this is very well printed, and includes a full set of stencils for the aircraft. They look to be very well produced and in register. There are 3 attractive schemes included: Marking A: Serial DK296, No.3 FTU, Errol, Autumn 1943 (in Russian Markings), Marking B: Serial DZ637/P3-C, No. 692 Sqn, Graveley, Spring 1944 in night bomber colours, Marking C: Serial DZ627/AZ-X, No. 627 Sqn, Woodhall Spa, Summer 1944 in daytime colours with invasion stripes. Instruction Manual: The very large almost A3 instruction manual runs to 28 pages, including colour schemes and the callouts for the stencilling and decals. I often think that a good instruction sheet makes me want to build a kit and this one certainly does that. And Finally Those Pilots. They are really well sculpted, great poses and will look marvellous next to the kit. I cant wait to paint these. Im not very aware of Steve Warillow and his sculpting work but if everything he does is this good he's a seriously talented figure sculpting master. These will look great under a coat of paint, and I cant wait to try them out. Final Thoughts. Well if you haven't worked it out yet I love this kit. from the advances single piece mouldings, the instruction sheet and throughout the whole presentation it just oozes class and its something that I think will fly off the shelf. It'll be hard to beat and I think at this point anyway it could well be the best 1/32 kit on the market. Its Highly recommended to all and even though its pricey I think it'll give you enough pleasure to justify the price. Thanks to HK Models and Neil Yan for supplying this review kit.
  8. Hello All, This is mt first WIP thread here. I did submit my completed WnW SE.5a in the early days of LSM, but I'm afraid since then I've been mainly modelling 1:72. Anyway, this project was started recently, and featured on Quitmodeller until recently...that's another story I guess. This is the story so far. I thought starting a build thread would motivate me to at least get on with the preliminary research, but more on that later... Usual Tamiya quality, looks like little or no filler will be needed, which is a good job in this case... I also went for the simple Eduard etch set, Master Model brass machine guns, and as an experiment in time saving (ha ha) a set of Eduard pre-cut canopy masks: Even though the Mosquito is undoubtedly a beautiful aircraft, in model form I think it can often look a bit bland and “seen one seen them all” –ish. Maybe it’s because of the lack of surface detail to break up the wooden airframe skins, I don’t know. So I’ve decided to finish mine in unpainted form, just a bare wood finish with the appropriate bits finished in aluminium, steel and fabric. I realise that this would never be possible (or extremely unlikely) in real life due to the way the aircraft was assembled and finished, but the idea is to give an impression of the different materials used in construction. I’ve seen a couple of Mosquito models either semi, or completely finished like this, but none are particularly accurate as far as I can tell. Anyway, with all this in mind, I got some Uschi woodgrain decals (more on this later): And I’ll probably be using these in conjunction with the oil paint method of simulating woodgrain on certain features, as I did on my WnW SE.5a here: ...and Vallejo Air Silver (for the ailerons, elevators, nacelles, various fairings and covers), a CDL colour (for the rudder, which was fabric covered), and Vallejo Air Steel (for the forward cockpit armour). The Interior will be painted as normal, as will the propellers. I made a start by sketching the various panels onto photographs of the kit fuselage and wings. It’s not at all easy to figure out the panel breaks from reference photographs, but I’m getting there. In reality there would be hundreds of white dots all over the skins where the outer ply sheets were screwed and the heads filled, but I’ll not be including these:
  9. http://www.clubhyper.com/forums/forum.htm Brett Green writes: "This just in from Tamiya. More detail as it comes to hand at the Shizuoka Hobby Show (Marcus Nicholls will be on the ground with the latest news): Tamiya Kit No. 60326 1/32 De Havilland Mosquito FB Mk.VI Availability: July Japanese Retail Price: 19,800 yen (planned) The "Wooden Wonder" makes an appearance in highly impressive 1/32 scale! That was the nickname given to the De Havilland Mosquito series of aircraft, an ingenious and beautiful design which saw the versatile airplane made almost entirely of wood. Its outstanding speed and range ensured that the FB Mk.VI was used in a range of missions, including raids on important targets and infrastructure in the German homeland. It is often said that, until the advent of the Messerschmitt Me262, the German Luftwaffe did not have an adequate response to the "Mossie." About the Model • This is a 1/32 scale plastic model assembly kit. • At 515mm in wingspan, this masterpiece captures the elegant twin-engine form of the FB Mk.VI with astounding detail. This newly-tooled model was researched using real Mosquitos. • The cockpit interior is realistically depicted, right down to details such as the pilot's seat cushion. • The modeler is presented with a number of options in assembly of the kit. • Separate parts recreate bomb bay and wing underside 500lb bombs, plus 50-gallon drop tanks. • 3 figures are included. • Comes with 3 marking options, plus masking stickers. • A 12-page B5 size commemorative booklet includes color photographs and a detailed history of the Mosquito."
  10. Hi folks, Behind the scenes, LSM have been very proactive in working with HKM. Mostly on the Lancaster, but we have had a reasonable input to the forthcoming Mosquito kit too. If you'd like to see what we've been up to, then here is the box art, featuring my model, with the rest being done by LSM's graphic than division ( ) Pleased that we can finally announce it. Hope you like it!
  11. Hi guys and gals, The Mosquito is now finished, and all material submitted to Brett for publication in next month's Military Illustrated Modeller. A great kit to build. Pure fun, and no fussiness. Do yourself a favour...when this is released, buy it and share your work here. Here's mine, complete with Miracle Masks markings:
  12. Hi All, Here we go! Yet another Mosquito being build here on LSM while the kit is not even on the shelves yet. This kit arrived wrapped in bubbles, no decals and no instructions. Got these in PDF from Jim to help me out, since I'm not big with puzzles. Having already seen the sprues and kit at Telford the shock of all the slide mouldings wasn't big, but still impressive... Borrowed a few Mossie books from Cees (since I'm not an RAF expert) and just bought an HGW Sutton harness. My plan is to start with the instrument panel (some Airscale will help me out here) and see where I'll go from there! Let the journey begin...
  13. Morning folks! I've been busy beavering away on the HK Models Mosquito for the last week. This has been an exercise in understanding how the 350 parts go together. Thats right...I have no instructions Ideally, I want to build the version which carries a cookie, and also one with shrouded exhausts. Another thing I'd like to include are the invasion stripes. Matt suggested this: This is a possibility, but you'll notice un-shrouded exhausts. That's no big deal, but if anyone can suggest additional schemes with cookies and stripes, can you post here? I promise I'll include a couple of build images later today, or tomorrow, depending on how things go.
  14. Tally Ho! Despite the 1:32 Do 335B-2 being released soon, and the Do 335A-0 following in the not too distant future (already here with us at LSM!), HK Models has now painted in its plans for the release of the Mosquito (bomber version). There will actually be a few versions of this, and I can't confirm if several versions will be in the same box, but we thought you might like to see some renders of this great looking machine. For all you impatient types, pre-orders will be taken for this at Telford in November, and release looks to be happening in the first half of January 2015! I bet that took you by surprise! Any questions, ask away and I'll get you some answers. Enjoy!
  15. Whilst NOT strictly a walk-around, GUY5SY has asked that post the following YouTube clip here as there is an amazing amount of footage of the Lancaster and of the Mosquito whilst in the ground and both inside and out. Then, of course, you get to see and hear 6 aircraft powered by Merlin engines flying in formation with each other :- It's glorious!! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ceuU1UQuwVU Enjoy it. Grant
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