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Spitfire Flap postion


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I read somewhere that Spitfires with the engines off, the flaps are always in the up position. Is this correct, as I am not sure what would be correct for my Spitfire build. I am planning on having most od the cowling panels off, so the flaps could be shown in the down position then. Just checking as to what is correct. 

 

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Flaps/shnaps :)

 

Always up, unless you are willing and ready to encounter the wrath of the Queen's bloodthirsty corgis .

51876605162_03a5c2536f_h.jpg1746834687_TrentonSpitfire.jpeg.2b8853852b835a71c81a77d51a7e30e7.jpeg 

 

Edit: pilots of the above planes were never to be seen again...  AAAAAAMEN 👑

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Now, I remember reading the comments of - sadly now defunct - Spitfire arch-specialist Edgar. 
In theory, you could leave the flaps down, in practice, the post-landing procedure drilled in the heads of the pilots, was to raise the flaps. Even before expecting to escape the wrath of the Royal Corgis, the point was to escape the more immediate wrath of the crew chief. Lowered flaps on the ground meant possible damage and FOD.

Hubert

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3 hours ago, Martinnfb said:

Flaps/shnaps :)

 

Always up, unless you are willing and ready to encounter the wrath of the Queen's bloodthirsty corgis .

51876605162_03a5c2536f_h.jpg1746834687_TrentonSpitfire.jpeg.2b8853852b835a71c81a77d51a7e30e7.jpeg 

 

Edit: pilots of the above planes were never to be seen again...  AAAAAAMEN 👑

Martin

Thank you for the photographs - adds fuel to the fire.

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11 minutes ago, HubertB said:

Now, I remember reading the comments of - sadly now defunct - Spitfire arch-specialist Edgar. 
In theory, you could leave the flaps down, in practice, the post-landing procedure drilled in the heads of the pilots, was to raise the flaps. Even before expecting to escape the wrath of the Royal Corgis, the point was to escape the more immediate wrath of the crew chief. Lowered flaps on the ground meant possible damage and FOD.

Hubert

Thanks Hubert

I'm pretty sure I now understand why the flaps were supposed to be raised. Martin just posted a few photographs showing the flaps down and seems as if it was matter of rules and not a design issue. So, in essence, the flaps could be in either position.   

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Definitely rules and training, as Hubert mentioned, taildraggers were risking damage . I was being little goofy because of the topic itself emerging every so often all over the net. In another words : “ exceptio probat regulam," 

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2 hours ago, Peterpools said:

Thanks Martin. I'm going to go flaps up and try to be correct and for me, that's a milestone.

 

That's what I'd do Peter. Flaps up.

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I talked to a member here today about flaps and airplanes. I’m a realist guru, not an “all opened up” guy.

I used the example of a DC-3/C-47.  Taxiing with the flaps DOWN on a DC-3 was a huge NO-NO. And there was a real reason for it:  rock damage. 
The flaps were dropped during your takeoff checklist, and were immediately pulled up upon turning off the active. 
Taxiing with them down would absolutely tear up equipment and if a crew was observed to have the flaps down when they were no pulling on or off the active, at best it was a big suspension, and at worst, the crew would be fired. They were dead serious about that stuff. Those things got tore up enough without helping it along. 
I hydro locked a 2800 one time even after the prop had been walked through by hand for multiple revolutions, and we counted 8 clear blades with the starter before it acted stupid. Despite not switching on, I still got a week off. And that was for something OUT of my control. (Eventually traced to an internal engine problem) Just imagine on something you CAN control: like choosing to taxi or park with the flaps down. If you park with them down, you’ll need the engines to pull them up.
A Spitty has the same issue.  Flaps are right in line with the prop, and form an almost right angle to the slipstream.  They’ll take an absolute beating from crap picked up by the prop.

I can think of exactly two aircraft that would benefit from parking with the flaps down:  the F4U Corsair and the T-28.  That’s it. 

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5 hours ago, Clunkmeister said:

I talked to a member here today about flaps and airplanes. I’m a realist guru, not an “all opened up” guy.

I used the example of a DC-3/C-47.  Taxiing with the flaps DOWN on a DC-3 was a huge NO-NO. And there was a real reason for it:  rock damage. 
The flaps were dropped during your takeoff checklist, and were immediately pulled up upon turning off the active. 
Taxiing with them down would absolutely tear up equipment and if a crew was observed to have the flaps down when they were no pulling on or off the active, at best it was a big suspension, and at worst, the crew would be fired. They were dead serious about that stuff. Those things got tore up enough without helping it along. 
I hydro locked a 2800 one time even after the prop had been walked through by hand for multiple revolutions, and we counted 8 clear blades with the starter before it acted stupid. Despite not switching on, I still got a week off. And that was for something OUT of my control. (Eventually traced to an internal engine problem) Just imagine on something you CAN control: like choosing to taxi or park with the flaps down. If you park with them down, you’ll need the engines to pull them up.
A Spitty has the same issue.  Flaps are right in line with the prop, and form an almost right angle to the slipstream.  They’ll take an absolute beating from crap picked up by the prop.

I can think of exactly two aircraft that would benefit from parking with the flaps down:  the F4U Corsair and the T-28.  That’s it. 

So no reason to add the flaps option on the C-47/DC-3, then, eh Ernie ;) ?

Hubert

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2 hours ago, HubertB said:

So no reason to add the flaps option on the C-47/DC-3, then, eh Ernie ;) ?

Hubert

Actually, no there isn’t.  They do look cool down, as in modeler’s license, but they certainly shouldn’t be on a full scale machine unless you’re modeling it pulling on the active. 
But, the flap kit contains an absolutely gorgeous boarding ladder, a pair of wheel chocks.  You won’t need the ladder, but anyone building a freight bird does.

Also, notice the kit comes with the correct tailcone for a civilian bird.  A wartime glider hook bulkhead is included, but HPH make you cut off the tailcone to install that.

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