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June 2015 releases


Maciej
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Dear LSM members and visitors,

Four new books will be published by Kagero in June 2015.

 

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Arado Ar 234 Blitz Vol. II

Marek J. Murawski

ISBN 978-83-64596-65-0

• 120 pages
• 35 archival photos
• 100 redenders
• 24 pages pages A4, and 3 pages format A2 drawings with technical data
• 2 drawings sheets  A4,  scale 1:72
• 1 double B2 sheet with drawings sheets, scale 1:32
• 1 single-track B2 sheet with drawings sheets, scale 1:48
• format (sizes): (210x297 mm)
• matte coated paper
• soft cover binding
 

[…] Other Projects
Tests with the Arado Ar 234 prototypes demonstrated that straight wings retained their good aerodynamic characteristics only at speeds below 800 kph. Near-supersonic flights demanded a completely new approach to wing geometry. On 9th December 1942 two Arado company engineers, Rüdiger Kosin and Walter Lehmann, patented a crescent shaped wing, which had its sweep and chord decreasing from root to tip. In mid-1944 Kosin decided to use his wing design on the Arado 234. Five variants of the wing were built, designated Versuchsflügel I through V, each differing in its sweep. Nevertheless, none of them was used in practice. The most advanced work on this project was carried out at Dedelsdorf airbase, where the Ar 234 V16 was being re-built as part of this research. The aircraft was destroyed in mid-April 1945 by advancing British troops as they captured the airfield. […]

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Available in preorder in Kagero’s webshop

 

 

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The Japanese Aircraft Carriers Sōryū and Hiryū

Mirosław Skwiot

ISBN 978-83-64596-52-0

• 100 pages
• 82 archive photos
• 30 drawings
• 16 Colour profiles

• 1 map
• format (sizes): (210x297 mm)
• matte coated paper
• hard cover binding

Aircraft carrier Hiryū
As mentioned in the previous chapter, Hiryū was the second aircraft carrier included in “The Second Naval Armaments Supplement Program” of 1934. Originally both carriers were supposed to be sister vessels, but the number of design modifications introduced during the construction of Sōryū resulted in many differences between the two. According to the original plans Hiryū was to be completed a year after Sōryū, but her construction (similarly to her predecessor) suffered delays caused by two key factors. The first one was the implementation of the lessons learned during the reconstruction of Kaga, which was going on simultaneously with Hiryū’s construction. Then there was new data available from the early service days of Sōryū, which exposed some of the design’s drawbacks and weaknesses. The number of issues popping up “along the way” was further increased by the Fourth Fleet Incident and by Japan’s withdrawal from the previously signed naval treaties. Considering all those issues, it is not hard to imagine the inevitable impact they had on Hiryū’s original design and construction schedule. The greatest source of delays was undoubtedly the aftermath of the Fourth Fleet Incident, which forced the Navy Aviation Bureau to introduce changes in the design of the second carrier. After the new requirements had been implemented, Hiryū’s final design (known as the “Basic Project G-10”) finally emerged. […]

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Available in preorder in Kagero’s webshop

 

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SMS Viribus Unitis
Austro-Hungarian Battleship

Andrew Wilkie, Friedrich Prasky

ISBN 978-83-64596-64-3

• 72 pages
• 123 renders
• Gloss coated paper
• Format (sizes): A4 (210x297 mm)
• Booklet binding

Tegetthoff Class
In 1907 the navy of the dualist, multinational Austro-Hungarian Empire placed an order for a new class of warships, whose design was based on the “all big gun” concept pioneered by HMS Dreadnought. Eventually four Tegetthoff class vessels were laid down, including the flagship Viribus Unitis, Tagetthoff, Prinz Eugen and Szent Istvan. The last warship of the class was not completed until well into World War I. The vessels’ careers were not especially eventful. They spent most of their service lives as a “fleet in being” anchored in a well-protected port of Pola with only occasional trips to the Fažana Channel (well-screened by Brijuni Islands) for gunnery practice. During the war the ships were manned mainly by reservists, while the most promising and experienced members of their crews were detached to serve onboard submarines or torpedo boats, or assigned to land-based units. The second ship of the class ended her career in rather dramatic circumstances, which is why she perhaps deserves a more detailed treatment.
Viribus Unitis
The Battleship IV was laid down at San Marco on July 23, 1910 and launched on June 24, 1911. The Emperor’s court used the occasion to organize a lavish celebration designed to carry a strong political message. The Emperor insisted that the battleship be given a rather unusual, Latin name Viribus Unitis (Strength in Unity – Emperor’s personal motto). […]

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Available in preorder in Kagero’s webshop

 

We invite to visit our website www.kagero.eu

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