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WillScarlet

Photographing your work

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  I'm  a complete ignoramus about modern DSLR photography concerning documenting WIP and etc. The first item I would like to address is what types of cameras and features should one look for?  Can what I'm looking for be kept as simple as possible, because cameras with all the "bells and whistles" and "features" are REALLY confussing to me?

         I hope this topic is of some interest to others as well as to myself.

 

   Will     :D

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Hi Will,

 

I have replied to your other question in the Pfalz topic, but I think this is a good topic to have here, and because of that, I'll PIN it. ;)

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Someone posted an excellent guide to model photography on the pre-crash SP&R. Extremely informative and I just happened to bookmark it. I will post it here when I get home from work today

 

Paul

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Doogs, your blog was/is VERY informative. I have a starting point for what to look for in a camera. I've had a little experience with an older SLR film camera and really prefer manual settings. It was a "trial-n-error" thing with me! LOL :D

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  If I was to go to .................... say........ Best Buy Electronics,  and try explaining what I'm looking for, do you think they would know enough to help pick a camera .............. or do any of you all have suggestions? Don't want to go "overboard" in expense. I would rather just walk in knowing what I want.          :rolleyes:

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Go to a camera shop to ask questions. You don't have to buy there. Best buy people know absolutely nothing about the things they sell.

 

I just bought a Nikon D3100 with 2 lenses from Dell, believe it or not.

 

Paul

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If any of you guys are knowledgeable, then feel free to populate this topic with your own information and setup, including photos ;)

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How much can you spend? I think the absolute best camera for your money right now is a Canon EOS 60D. Don't get the kit with lens though. Buy a good lens to go with it. You can even get a used one to stretch your dollar. I got the EF-S 17-55 f/2.8. Stunning lens but pricey. For the best image quality get the best lens you can afford. Consider a prime (ie. non-zoom lens) since zooming is not necessary for model photography. A 35mm is perfect for this type of camera.

 

The other option is the Canon Rebel Series, or as they're called overseas, xxxD (e.g. 550D). Again, don't get one with a kit lens. Buy a better lens separately.

 

Then, shoot only in RAW mode, and select aperture priority mode (Av) choosing f/20 or f/22, so the whole model is in focus. Set ISO to 100 to minimize noise. Get light sources from several angles and a nice smooth solid background that curves from horizontal to vertical. Never flash.

 

Hope that helps!

 

If I was to go to .................... say........ Best Buy Electronics, and try explaining what I'm looking for, do you think they would know enough to help pick a camera .............. or do any of you all have suggestions? Don't want to go "overboard" in expense. I would rather just walk in knowing what I want. :rolleyes:

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I use a Nikon D7000. Not that you'd need one to photograph models but I like to take pictures of flying aircraft too...

Been toying today. The best pics get made outside where you have the normal daylight color temperature.

 

Tip: if making pics outside; the lighting is best with a light overcast, it filters the harshness of the light and gives nicer softer shadows. Also don't forget that daylight in winter is much more blue than in summer, when it's much more yellow.

 

Where I live we have a temperate sea climate: that means quite some rain unfortunately, so I have invested in some studio lighting to get "daylight" inside. And enough of it, for that matter! See: http://forum.largescalemodeller.com/topic/1633-dutch-decals-spitfire-lf-mkixc-lsk-322-sqn-netherlands-east-indies-1948/

 

I'm not quite satisfied with the results but that probably has as much to do with the settings of my camera because I shot the first pic in JPG, while I normally shoot RAW... Didn't feel like tweaking photos in Lightroom today but that turned out to be a wrong shortcut! ;)

 

This was the set-up thrown together for today. If I was seriously photographing a model I would include a paper background of a neutral color. Now the tabletop had to fulfill that function which meant I couldn't take horizontal photos because I didn't want all the clutter in the background showing! Errr... now I'm saying that; please ignore the mess! :)

 

modelfoto1.jpg

 

modelfoto2.jpg

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I'd be tempted to bring the lights down a bit (mine are about a foot lower than that). Other than that, neutral background, shoot in RAW etc and I think you'll be going places.

 

The D7000 is a really nice camera - what lens are you shooting with? One thing I've found is that longer focal lengths tend to do this weird thing where they "compress" the kit so it feels smaller and less imposing. It's all about the picture angle and weird illusions the mind plays, but...

 

This was shot with my D300s packing a 60mm macro:

 

See original post for photo

 

Same plane, same camera, 35mm lens:

 

See original post for photo

 

Ey Matt, sorry for the delay in my reaction!

 

I've set up my "studio" in the attic. Rigged a backgound over an old desk, positioned the lights and voilá. When I bought this camera I also invested in a sturdy Manfrotto tripod. The one I had was really too light, so very susceptible for movement. A good tripod isn't cheap but should last a looooong time!

 

P1110137_zps05169ae8.jpg

 

As for lenses; I use my Nikkor 24-70 f/2.8

 

P1110138_zps38135a3a.jpg

 

And for detail work I have a Sigma 105mm f/2.8 macro

 

P1110140_zps940b1393.jpg

 

Cheers!

Erik.

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I was going to post that a tripod is essential, but I see thet several people have already mentioned them, one thing that hasn't been mentioned is a remote release, either a cable or wireless remote, because even the act of pressing the shutter button will impart vibrations that can spoil a photo, especially at slow shutter speeds, if you cant find a remote to suit then you can use the camera's built in timer function to take the shot without touching the camera.

 

Edit:

A photo of a 1/48 Hurricane taken with a Canon 7d, 24-105 lens on a tripod with a wireless remote, shutter speed was 1/4 sec, Aperture f/10 and ISO 100.

IMG_4983.jpg

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HELP !!!

 

I love this topic!  I'm just about to hit the button on buying a new camera (my aged Canon is way too decrepit and I spend so much time on the laptop trying to correct things that I have decided to replace it AND, I discovered the other day that the lens I have is an old "film" lens therefore the focal point[?] is way out!)

 

So .... Nikon D3200 or another Canon 1100D ???  

 

Both are about the same price ... both come with a 18-55mm lens. (I can get a remote shutter device for the Nikon too)

 

UPDATE:

Read up on a whole lot of reviews and the Nikon came out top .. so, that's the one I've gone for.

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I have a Canon 1100D that I use at work.. It's a great camera and I have no issues with it. It does it's job very well.

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I've shied away from buying a decent camera since there's just not that much that I want to take pictures of. Now that I'm back to building, though, I can see that I'll need something a bit more advanced than my iPhone camera... Thanks for all the info - time to raid the piggy bank and get something decent!

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When I got back into modeling I used my I-Phone to take pictures of my builds on my bench. As my modeling skill levels improved I wanted a more polished professional look to my photographs so I put out the word to friends concerning purchasing a DSLR. Friendship ruled the day and I was given a Minolta Maxxum D5 DSLR with a standard lens plus a telephoto lens.

I bought a tripod, modified my homemade light box with additional lighting and a neutral backdrop and so far the results are like night and day!!!  I’ve noticed that several members of the FB Group have adopted neutral backdrops in their build photos, lol!!

Still leaning the fine art of DSLR photography but looking forward to better and better results!

 

My new Minolta Maxxum D5 DSLR

063_zpsffc4fa20.jpg
 

Homemade photo box.

7ADA77AB-2EB6-4786-A24D-7CECBCAED41E_zps

 

Hind using I-Phone and old photo box.

4E71E313-FF68-4E04-B1E2-981D814A0AB6_zps

 

Hind using DSLR and neautral back drop

2770022E-A277-41DE-A689-B4BA3DB3B9E8_zps

 

I'm sold, lol!!!

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Yep - I learned when I was submitting work for gallery shows (waaaay back when) that the quality of a photograph can make or break your work. Back then, I sprung for a professional photog when I needed, because it wasn't something that I did that often.

 

Now, I'm going to be doing a good bit of WIP shots as well as finished work, so I guess it's time.

 

So let me see... Airbrush, camera, lathe, milling machine, vac-form kit, home photo-etch supplies... Mrs Poet must never, ever, ever see the price tag for my "cheap" hobby! 80

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Yep - I learned when I was submitting work for gallery shows (waaaay back when) that the quality of a photograph can make or break your work. Back then, I sprung for a professional photog when I needed, because it wasn't something that I did that often.

 

Now, I'm going to be doing a good bit of WIP shots as well as finished work, so I guess it's time.

 

So let me see... Airbrush, camera, lathe, milling machine, vac-form kit, home photo-etch supplies... Mrs Poet must never, ever, ever see the price tag for my "cheap" hobby! 80

 

Wow that's a big list, lol!!

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Though be it a Canon. I purchased the 18/200 Canon lens for gp and modeling photography at shows. At the house I have a couple of macro lens for use in my photo booth (poster paper taped to the washing machine :rolleyes: )

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Hi Sharpshooters,

Old thread, (more or less) new kid in town :D.

I recieved a Havox Photobox today. It is a cubus of 80cm width, so it should be suitable for models up to 60cm wingspan (B-25 ?????).

https://www.amazon.de/HAVOX-Fotostudio-80x80x80cm-LED-Beleuchtung-kommerziellen/dp/B01ATFIJYE/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1503580427&sr=8-3&keywords=havox

That ugly shot shows the size of the box with a 1/32 Raiden in it. 

IMG_3602.JPG.eead96adcea77378e0335e249a66ad2a.JPG

That was my first test shot, free handed, without any adjustments with f8. As I'm a landscape photographer and startrd to take photos of model kits just recently I will have to do a lot of experiments in the next time. I promise though my photos will improve and I will not hurt your eyes again.

P1130443.thumb.JPG.f698d498155a3a71585c8e8b4bd9bf3f.JPG

I use a Panasonic-Lumix GH3 which is a Micro 4/3 camera with interchangeable lenses. I have a lot of different lenses, but use manely prime lenses and no zooms.
I like the 90mm Macro from Leica for Modelling shots, because of the distortion free depiction. For field shooting I adore my 85mm Leica prime lense with f1,2 (I love to do available light stuff, mainly in black and white) and my 30mm f 1,7, specially because of a full metal case and thanks god, a real aperture ring, like in the old days. This makes it so much easier to handle the cam in lowlight conditions, at least when you are not using automatics. My third "always in the bag lens" is a zoom, but a special one with a focal length between 14mm and 28mm for the more dramatic stuff, but not useful for modelling subjects.

After some more expieriences in the next days I will leave some shots of the finished Raiden in the Finished work section.

Cheers Rob

 

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Rob

Thanks for posting and I've been looking at light-boxes as well and nice to see another 'passionate' photographer on the forum. Besides model building, I'm very serious about my photography and have been a Nikon Man since the  late 1960's. Currently, I shoot with a Nikon D850 and my kit has transformed over the years to the Holy Trinity of lenses: 16-35, 24-70 and a 70-200. For all my model and macro work: Nikkor 105 Micro and my big gun is the 200-500, used just once :(

I've always maintained the most important 'tool' in the bag: is the photographer.

Awesome equipment and I'm drooling over the Leica 30mm 1 .7.

Looking forward to your review

Peter

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