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ThomasProbert

1/32nd scale Avro Shackleton AEW2 - scratchbuild project

124 posts in this topic

Cheers for the compliments, chaps.

 

Today I have completed the cockpit roof area - it's had a spray of filler-primer which has hidden the multitude of sins below:

 

27449902266_e829026078_c.jpg

 

And with some fine tweaking of the cockpit bulkhead...

 

27484306305_8bf7caf159_c.jpg

 

The section fits a treat...

 

27449903236_37df323543_c.jpg

 

27484305415_cd19a529dd_c.jpg

 

...if you ignore the big gaps that is. But they'll disappear when it's fitted properly, he says hopefully.

 

I'm pleased to have got this part out of the way - it was worrying me as getting the cockpit right is critical in getting the character of the real aircraft. I'm confident that when I've added the observer's glazing atop the nose section it'll look acceptable. The real fun will be the glazing itself, but 'Tigger' Wilkes has come to the rescue and supplied me with three of his canopies for his 1/32nd Lancaster which I can cut up to drop the glass areas in later in the build.

 

Until next time,

 

Tom

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You hit the nail on the head by stating that it is the character that's important. That's how I feel too. The Tamiya Lancaster for example failed miserably

in that class regarding the windscreen and nose section. However impressive it (still) is.

Cees

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I haven't had any time at the bench to work on this project, but thought I'd share some 3D printing that's been helping with this build...
 
I'm indebted to Kev67 for his help here - he's done some beautiful prints of the main wheels:
 
28392333342_e19ea2721f_c.jpg
 
And the engine nacelles, exhausts and spinners:
 
28497385385_13cef080ef_c.jpg
 
And after a gentle sand and priming:
 
28392334752_d518983682_c.jpg
 
28392334002_fa28c8d607_c.jpg
 
In sort, this'll save a whole lot of complex scratch-building smile.png
 
Tom

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Afternoon all - time for a long over-due update on the Shackleton project...

 

I've recently been focusing on the nose section where the observer/gunner sat:

 

28088873113_ccf9be4660_c.jpg

 

On the AEW2s the 20mm cannon were removed but the seat remained. This was on a stilt-like structure which was raised above the bombaimer's window below, which when in it's MR2 guise gave him access to the bomb sight fitted below. I scratch-built this from plastic card and Milliput, and pictures showed some nice leather upholstery so stitching was replicated with a rivet wheel while the Milliput was still wet:

 

28704395905_a0260bbe16_c.jpg

 

With the interior of the nose being black, and very little being visible with the seat in situ, I haven't bothered to detail this area and it would be a waste of time. Here's a test fitting of the seat which sat below the transparency:

 

28086847604_64111f6793_c.jpg

 

Next I made a roof section for the flattish area on the top of the nose from 1mm plastic card, and added the more curved sides from plastic card 'planks':

 

28086846194_f6731f2f5c_c.jpg

 

This was then blended in with automotive filler:

 

28086845514_74325e9bd6_c.jpg

 

After this was all sanded smooth I began working on the upper fairing:

 

28704395145_0603a95c7b_c.jpg

More 'planking':

 

28086844244_e53a235e6f_c.jpg

 

An initial sand to remove any rough edges:

 

28086844174_b962761c38_c.jpg

 

More automotive filler:

 

28086843344_09b0969029_c.jpg

 

Halford's filler-primer applied and a good rub down with some fine grade sandpaper:

 

28704396575_4bfbd87865_c.jpg

 

And finally I had a passable resemblance to the real thing:

 

28723007275_7d3e1fbef3_c.jpg

 

28438489660_c56e18f9d6_c.jpg

 

Slowly but surely, what started out as a 'let's give this a go and see how we get on project' is starting to come together:

 

28722999275_e84bdc8a61_c.jpg

 

28438496040_80e6766fa8_c.jpg

 

The gun turret itself still needs to made, but that can wait for another day.

 

Until next time...

 

Tom

Mainly28s, GusMac and Dennis.E like this

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Good to see an update Tom,

That fairing looks really good and adds to the Shack's character.

Cees

 

Many thanks, Cees.

 

It's another very distinctive part of the aircraft, and if wrong would spoil the whole look of the model. I'm confident it'll pass as it is...

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Two updates in the space of a week? Wow - I'm back in the groove smile.png

 

I've been focusing on the inboard engine nacelles in the last few sessions at the bench - as well as the plans I have there's also plenty of information on the 'net, too. Check out this beautifully detailed image of the St Mawgan MR2 gate-guardian being disassembled ready for a brighter future (picture courtesy of the RAF news website)

 

28756717886_c987b395be_c.jpg

 

Notice how the firewalls are not circular as I had always presumed - this would have to be carefully replicated on my build - here they are in situ:

 

28711259931_a321654750_c.jpg

 

Although the Shackleton shared many common parts with the Lancaster inboard nacelles (more on that shortly) the Shackleton nacelle was much longer and had a streamlined fairing which protruded from the trailing edge of the wing. This was carefully copied from the plans and glued to the wing:

 

28756676816_64ec01b807_c.jpg

 

I was able to use the wheel-bay area of the ID Models Lancaster kit, and once the forward and rear bulkheads were made and added from plastic card, this gave a good starting point to start creating the rear section of the nacelle from plastic card formers:

 

28170727804_bac8852dde_c.jpg

 

Both sets were made alongside each other and added simultaneously to ensure they are identical:

 

28788671665_2ff5fac683_c.jpg

 

The forward-most section immediately behind the firewall and and the rear sections will now be skinned with the planking method I've used before:

 

28711259191_5b1d1ababf_c.jpg

 

...so when that's done I'll update you again.

 

Tom 

Pardelhas and Wingco57 like this

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Can't wait to see this up close in Telford...

 

 

(counting on you to bring it ;) )

 

Thanks for stopping by and your kind words. Yes Jeroen, I'll bring it along as a work in progress and there's no chance it'll be finished by then. 

 

A bit more progress to report...

 

I've got the inboard engine nacelles and fairings completed this week, which began by once again using plastic card 'planks' to cover the frame of the nacelles built previously. This method is time consuming, but allows the complex curves of the shape to be replicated far more easily than using sheets of larger card, as bending this to shape and getting it to conform to the desired shape is more hassle than it's worth. It all looks a little rough and ready in this picture, and you can see how the donor Lancaster nacelle starts to taper a lot sooner than on the Shackleton as the Lancaster nacelle fairing is of course in line with the trailing edge - unlike the Shackleton. This mis-shape would be solved with filler:

 

28281788223_0864aeb1a1_c.jpg

 

In this photo you can see how the extreme rear of the nacelle would be very difficult to get right with the plank method, so instead I sculpted this complex shape with Milliput, seen here after an initial sanding:

 

28612163070_9b97f5b8c4_c.jpg

 

After the usual P38 automotive filler treatment and a thorough session with the wet and dry paper, the nacelle took on the shape of the real thing and is now as smooth as a baby's bottom - you can see how the filler has built up the dip at the taper at the end of the Lancaster donor parts and planks, solving the shape problem:

 

28896852425_19154c4535_c.jpg

 

28281789723_e9194d2c15_c.jpg

 

I'm really pleased with the results, and I think have captured the complex shape of the real aircraft reasonably well - or as well as I could hope for, anyway!

 

28281790763_ba77c6e64c_c.jpg

 

28281789053_0ea4f383cc_c.jpg

 

28279471024_d96f0dd5ce_c.jpg

 

28281793383_a8116953e2_c.jpg

 

You've probably noticed the nacelles haven't had their usual coating in filler-primer, and that's because I've run out... and I've also just run out of P38 too; that's a whole tin used on this project so far. A trip to Halfords, me thinks...

 

28279472274_14685d3f5a_c.jpg

 

...but when you consider this project has cost me nothing more than the price of some plastic card sheets and £7.99 for a tub of P38, that's pretty good going!

 

Until next time,

 

Tom

Dennis.E, Pardelhas and GusMac like this

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Tom,

I know you feel great after having pulled off this potentially problem stage but you passed with flying colours.

It must be awkward handling the model while you were filling and sanding those nacelles. I noticed that the

fuselage has that square bulk as the original and looks just great.

 

What is the difference between that P38 filler you use and Milliput? I would have made that nacelle mostly from

Milliput but the problem would be that the model would become too heavy.

Hmm, perhaps I have answered my own queston already. For the Manchester I have to completely build the nacelles

from scratch too so your tutorial is right on time.

 

Keep it up, this is getting better and better with every update.

Cees

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Tom,I know you feel great after having pulled off this potentially problem stage but you passed with flying colours.It must be awkward handling the model while you were filling and sanding those nacelles. I noticed that thefuselage has that square bulk as the original and looks just great.

 

What is the difference between that P38 filler you use and Milliput? I would have made that nacelle mostly from Milliput but the problem would be that the model would become too heavy. Hmm, perhaps I have answered my own queston already. For the Manchester I have to completely build the nacellesfrom scratch too so your tutorial is right on time.Keep it up, this is getting better and better with every update.Cees

Thanks for dropping in Cees, and for you kind words once again.

 

Yes the size is an issue and handling it is not easy - the lamp has gone flying on numerous occasions!

 

The difference between P38 and Milliput is primarily that the former is used in the automotive industry. It is in two-parts (the filler and hardener) and dries absolutely solid in about 15 mins with no shrinkage. It's very easy to sand and can be scribed without problems, too. The bonus is also the fact that it's very light but also very strong. Milliput, as you know, is easier to sculpt when wet but takes an age to dry and doesn't sand quite as well. Each has their own strength for different jobs I suppose.

 

The P38 absolutely stinks though, so I'm banished to the garden if I want to use it.

 

I'll look forward to seeing you tackle the nacelles on your Manchester when the time comes.

 

Tom

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Thanks, that will be probably sooner than later. Sanding the perspex wingtip lights at the moment.

I agree that Milliput is heavy and slow drying, that P38 sounds good, might try that sometime.

Cees

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This week I've spent some time finishing off the nose section of the big Shackleton. When the MR2 airframes were converted to AEW2s, the nose armament of cannons and sighting gear was removed, but the turret fairing itself remained with the gun apertures blanked over - see here on this image of an AEW2:

 

29021488635_eb751523b7_z.jpg

 

To replicate this, I first cut a piece of plastic card to the correct width of the nose, and heated it some hot water around a section of dowel to get the correct curvature. This was then glued to the nose and allowed to dry thoroughly:

 

28734549050_817921f9c8_c.jpg

 

Next, more plastic card faired in the sides, but you can see the sides don't match the contours of the fuselage yet:

 

28944855291_2586c385bf_c.jpg

 

These aerodynamic fairings were sculpted from Milliput and then finally blended with P38 and the whole area sanded smooth:

 

28400474324_eb149c2303_c.jpg

 

A bit of paneling and the covers for the guns were made from thin Evergreen strip and plastic card:

 

28915702512_531c8f41f9_c.jpg

 

And hey presto - the nose was done!

 

28400475004_730824378c_c.jpg

 

The camera angle and my poor photography skills makes everything look a bit elongated, but you get the idea!

 

Until next time,

 

Tom

ArnieC and GusMac like this

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WOW!!!!!! Just one word WOW!!!!! :notworthy: :notworthy: :notworthy:

 

Cheers,

 

Arnold

 

Many thanks, Arnold.

 

Just thought this was worth sharing - here's the design for the tail wheels that a friend is 3D printing for me. This man has some serious talent!

 

28924100502_cc8c461cb6_c.jpg

 

Saves on some serious scratch-building time smile.png

 

Tom

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