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Davis Recoilless Aircraft Rifle (1917)


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https://www.shapeways.com/shops/maxmnemonic

Davis gun was the first true recoilless gun developed and taken into service. It was designed by Commander Cleland Davis of the US Navy, in 1910, just prior to World War I. His design connected two guns back to back, with the backwards-facing gun loaded with lead balls and grease of the same weight as the shell in the other gun, acting as a counter. His idea was used experimentally by the British and America as an anti-Zeppelin and anti-submarine weapon mounted on various flying boats and bombers.

 

Usually a Lewis machine gun was mounted on top of the Davis gun's barrel which was then used for sighting and as an auxiliary and anti-aircraft weapon. The direct development of the gun ended with World War I, but the firing principle has been copied by later designs.

 

Gun is available in 1:32 and 1:48 scales.

 

1:32 is suitable to use with Wingnut Wings Felixstowe F.2A flying boats (early and late).
List of machines Davis gun was used on:
- Curtiss H-16
- Curtiss HS-1L (and HS-2L)
- Felixstowe flying boats
- Norman Thompson N.T.4
- Handley Page 0/100
- Caudron G.IV (RNAS)

 

Model provided with a stand (cut required stand-arm length) and 4 shells.

Before painting carefully wash model in soapy water, to remove oil residue. Afterwards wash it with running water. Model can be painted with acrylics. Important - gun can come slighly bended after printing, don't worry, gently bend it by hand to make it straignt. Plastic allows certain amount of flexibility.

Would be great to see your models with Davis Gun installed, so please share them!

 

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