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Lots of options for the very adventurous. 

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Yakutia diorama.

 
Shortly after takeoff from Batagay Airport, while in initial climb, the crew encountered technical problems with both engines. Unable to gain sufficient height, the pilot-in-command attempted an emergency landing near a river located one km from the airfield. The airplane hit trees, crash landed, lost its undercarriage and came to rest in a wooded area. While all five crew members were uninjured, the airplane was written off. 
Causes:  
It was determined that the crew failed to prepare the flight properly and hurried the departure. With an OAT of -48° C., the oil was not sufficiently warm and this caused the engine to run improperly after rotation, with propellers blocked in an angle between 20° and 30°, causing drag and impeding the plane to gain sufficient altitude. In such conditions, an emergency landing was unavoidable.

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A couple extra engines would have helped

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Further to the earlier discussion regarding Buffalo Airways' recreation of a D Day drop, the last episodes of the Buffalo Airways series "Ice Pilots" also recreated a D Day drop using their C-47 C-GWZS which flew during D Day as KG330. I found the story especially interesting as I have a connection with that particular airframe. After the war, KG330 went on to serve with the Canadian Forces eventually ending up as aircraft 12913, an air navigator training platform with 429 Squadron in support of the Canadian Forces Air Navigation School, Winnipeg. Aircraft 12913 is significant in that the last of two training flights were conducted on it on 26 May 1975 before its retirement and eventually ending up initially with Northwest Territorial Airways then with Buffalo Airways as C-GWZS. My connection? I was the aircraft captain of that last navigator training flight which lasted 5.2 hours. The following picture is of the crew - me second from the left.

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Wow, great picture Grizly, thanks for sharing !

Cheers

M.

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Grizly, I always wondered who flew those Daks. Y'all must have had your fair share of comments from the rotorheads and go fast boys.

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Well Clunkmeister, the Douglas swept wing racer may have only cruised at 150 knots but she had eight hours worth of gas, was built like a tank and was incredibly dependable. I racked up over 2000 hours in three years and never had an engine failure. Not bad for an ex USAAF C-47 (original serial number 42-92518) that was over 30 years old when I was flying the type and is still kicking around with Buffalo Airways.

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435 Chinthe Sqdn RCAF at Tulihul India, Sqdn/Ldr Bob Clements OC 'A' Flight, low and over............or , on the deck................. one of my favorite photos.....

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nice one Jeff !, look at the battered leading edge, such a classic design . 

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And here is one Li-2 still sitting in the field of Vysny Komarnik in eastern part of Slovakia. I am truly surprised that gypsies haven't recycled this one yet, probably too much work :)

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There are few differences , especially the location of entry door at the right side of the fuselage and re-positioned cargo door, closer to the wing root.

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The airplane departed the Polar Station SP-21 in the early morning on a flight to the North Pole (Arctic region) with six crew members and three scientists (hydrologists) on board, and was used for communications with Soviet submarines cruising in the Arctic zone. The crew found a suitable area to land located about 500 km north of the Queen Elizabeth Islands, NWT. After landing, the scientists proceeded to ice inspection and it was reported that the ice thickness was 47 cm, which was considered as insufficient to leave the aircraft parked for a long period. The decision was taken to leave the area to find another one when the left ski went through the ice, followed shortly later by the right ski. The aircraft was blocked into the ice and impossible to move. Due to the presence of sensible equipments on board, it was decided to destroy the airplane that partially sank. All nine occupants were evacuated two days later by the crew of an Antonov AN-2.

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They look positively dejected

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On 1/30/2019 at 2:43 PM, Grizly said:

Well Clunkmeister, the Douglas swept wing racer may have only cruised at 150 knots but she had eight hours worth of gas, was built like a tank and was incredibly dependable. I racked up over 2000 hours in three years and never had an engine failure. Not bad for an ex USAAF C-47 (original serial number 42-92518) that was over 30 years old when I was flying the type and is still kicking around with Buffalo Airways.

I used to joke with the Doug Jockeys about how even all up loaded with full fuel and oil, toothbrushes and flight bags, plus a little "extra" freight for Mother and Country, the Doug still weighed less than the empty weight of our 46s.   We'd run right by them if we shoved the loud levers forward, but the bigshots really frowned at that.  so we were still faster, but maybe by only 25 kts or so, not much, really.  But the 46 not only carried more freight, she sure loved to drink fuel. A great moneymaker when loaded. But it'd break a guy quick if you were running Douglas loads in them.  One thing that really surprised me was how slippery they were. You push the nose down, and speed would build up quickly. You could hit 250 kts real easy if you let it go. Not good for the engines, obviously. So you paid attention.  You treat them well, they treat you well. 

I never had an engine failure either, although I did have one prop go screwy, not a runaway per se, but it started surging and not responding to input. Slowed down to maximum left leg extension speed (still had pedal travel left) and that didn't cage it, so because we were at 12500, pulled back the good one and hung it nose high till it finally feathered. That little exercise took almost 6000 ft. That day I actually had visions of them finding a torn up 2800 about 5 miles from the main debris field.. 

Even though the CAF had pretty much finished with the Daks when I was flying commercially, I remember while flying privately how your Daks were always so spiffy and well presented, and then when I was flying, our equipment was wearing more Aeroshell than was in the tanks.  Good memories. :)

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This is great discussion guys. It is so much fun to listen to the old pilots sharing their stories. What took me by surprise was the fact how unusual it feels to walk into to the cockpit on Dakota. The incline is steep and to sit in the pilot's seat in the legs-up position  feels funny. Very different from An-2 for example .

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You get used to it, Martin. 

The trick for me on the 46 was to pull my seat forward. Even in my youth I looked like an idiot. 

The first airline trip I remember was on a DC-3.  Actually, the first bunch of airline trips were on DC-3. It sure beat taking the train or driving.  The mainline airlines were running DC-8s, DC-9s, Viscounts and Vanguards  

Less than 200 kts is boring today, but back then, man, you were flying.  

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yes,  Ernie.....'pristine'................. isn't this just about as pretty as an airplane can get??  Back in the day when our airplanes were gorgeous, we had an Air force back then....... very proud times.....  I wish we would go back to these paints....... everyone in the world knew it was RCAF !!!

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And don't forget, these guys made them too... well sorta... Showa L2D Tabby

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Edited by Jeff
more info
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16 hours ago, Clunkmeister said:

The first airline trip I remember was on a DC-3.

Likewise.

My first ever flight was on a Bush Pilot Airways DC-3, a one hour early evening jaunt around my hometown of Rockhampton Queensland purchased by my Dad for my 15th birthday in 1982.

One of BPA's Gooneys with Rocky in the background, may have been this one but u/f I failed to record the serial at the time.

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At last some civvy :thumbsup2: !

This is where the old Gooney really got his legendary wings, IMHO (not trying to minimise its merits during WWII, or in Vietnam, mind you, but my inclinations are definitely not on the warry side)...

Bring more :popcorn:

Hubert

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A model I built of one the aircraft I flew back in the day. It's the old Monogram 1/48 scale kit with Leading Edge decals. While I might be somewhat biased, such a model in 1/32 scale would be awesome (and bring back memories).

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8 hours ago, Jeff said:

yes,  Ernie.....'pristine'................. isn't this just about as pretty as an airplane can get??  Back in the day when our airplanes were gorgeous, we had an Air force back then....... very proud times.....  I wish we would go back to these paints....... everyone in the world knew it was RCAF !!!

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This could very easily be a scheme I'd do. It would even match the HK Lanc scheme  :) 

Jeff you're right. There was NO mistaking RCAF or CAF birds, no matter where they went.  Even the go-to-war nuke equipped  101 Voodoos carried a similar scheme for awhile. 

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