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RLM paint technical orders WW2, fighters and bombers


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From an article I rt-click-saved from I dunno where.

 

Maybe there's one or two on here might find it useful. (If they don't already have similar notes.)

;)

 

Regards

 

_________

 

RLM T.O.s

 

Reichsluftministrium (RLM) regulations state that, prior to November 1941, cockpits/crew areas were to be RLM Green-Gray 02, with the exception of instrument panels which were Gray with black instrument faces. After November 1941 all cockpit/crew areas visible through the glazing (windows) were to be RLM Black-Gray 66. Instrument panels remained as previously stated.

Fuel lines were yellow, oil lines were brown, coolant lines were green, oxygen lines were blue and fire extinguisher lines were red. Here is a general guide of specific aircraft by type arranged alphabetically. Keep in mind that, with any military regulation, variations of implementation and interpretation were often seen.

 

FIGHTERS

 

Bachem

Ba349 series: Cockpit areas are RLM Black-Gray 66

 

Dornier

Do335 series: Cockpit areas are RLM Black-Gray 66

 

Focke Wulf

Fw190A *lFlG series: Cockpit areas are RLM Black Gray 66 * (with exception of prototype)

Fw190D series: Cockpit areas are RLM Black Gray 66

Ta152 series: Cockpit areas are RLM Black-Gray 66

Ta154 series: Cockpit areas are RLM Black-Gray 66

 

Gotha/Horton

Go/Ho 229 series: Cockpit areas are RLM Black-Gray 66

 

Heinkel

He51 series: Cockpit areas are RLM Green-Gray 02

He100 series: Cockpit areas are RLM Green-Gray 02

He112 series: Cockpit areas are RLM Green-Gray 02

He162 series: Cockpit areas are RLM Black-Gray 66

He219 series: Cockpit areas are RLM Black-Gray 66

 

Junkers

Ju88C-2/C-3 series: Cockpit areas are RLM Green-Gray 02

Ju88C-4 thru C-7/R/G series: Cockpit areas are RLM Black-Gray 66

 

Messerschmitt

Bf109B thru E-3 series: Cockpit areas are RLM Green-Gray 02

Bf109E-4 thru K series: Cockpit areas are RLM Black-Gray 66

Me163 series: Cockpit areas are RLM Black-Gray 66

Me262 series: Cockpit areas are RLM Black-Gray 66

Bf110B thru E series: Cockpit areas RLM Green-Gray 02

Bf110F thru G series: Cockpit areas RLM Black-Gray 66

Me210/410 series: Cockpit areas are RLM Black-Gray 66

 

BOMBERS

Arado

Ar234 series: Cockpit areas are RLM Black-Gray 66

 

Dornier

Do17E/F/M/P/Z series: Cockpit areas are RLM Green-Gray 02

Do217C thru E-3 series: Cockpit areas are RI,M Green-Gray 02

Do217E-4 thru P-0 series: Cockpit areas are RLM Black-Gray 66

 

Focke Wulf

Fw200C-0 thru C-3 series: Cockpit areas are RLM Green-Gray 02

Fw200C-4 thru C-8 series: Cockpit areas are RLM Black-Gray 66

 

Heinkel

He70 series: Cockpit areas are RLM Green-Gray 02

He111 Al B1 C1 Dl El Fl G1 J1 Pl H-1 thru H-5 series: Cockpit areas are RLM Green-Gray 02

He111 H 6 thru H 23/R/Z(zwilling) series: Cockpit areas are RLM Black-Gray 66

He177 series: Cockpit areas are RLM Black-Gray 66

 

Herschel

Hs123 series: Cockpit areas are RLM Green-Gray 02

Hs129A-0: Cockpit areas are RLM Green-Gray 02

Hs129B/R series: Cockpit areas are RLM Black-Gray 66

 

Junkers

Ju86 series: Cockpit areas are RLM Green-Gray 02

Ju87A/B/C/R series: Cockpit areas are RLM Green-Gray 02

Ju87D*/G series: Cockpit areas are RLM Black-Gray 66 *D-1 first 84 aircraft are RLM Green-Gray 02

Ju88A/B series: Cockpit areas are RLM Green-Gray 02

Ju88D*/H/P/S/T series: Cockpit areas are RLM Black-Gray 66 *approximately 660 D series aircraft produced with RLM Green Gray 02

Ju188/288/388 series: Cockpit areas are RLM Black-Gray 66

 

PART 2 -- WHEEL WELLS, ENGINE COMPARTMENTS, ETC...

 

Regulations for these interior areas were standardised, and not a lot of variation existed, except for late war fighter aircraft. This variance in the latter stage of the war was caused by a number of factors. One was due to the allied strategic bombing campaign, which caused production of aircraft to be decentralised, leading to differences depending on the subcontractor of the specific components. Another was the urgent need for fighters, and the haste with which they were produced, which caused some relaxation of compliance with official regulations in order to speed up production. Another consideration was the remanufacturing of aircraft, in which case whole assemblies were pre-painted at the same time. Where variations are documented, they will appear listing the type of aircraft they were seen on. Remember, this is a general guide, and your best verification will be your own reference material.

 

Engine Compartments

 

The interior of engine compartments were painted in RLM 02, with the exception of the firewall. This was painted RLM 02 on the cockpit side, but left unpainted on the engine side in most cases. All engine support braces, connecting rods and internal framework was also RLM 02. Pipelines for fuel, oil and coolant remained unpainted outside of the cockpit areas. Engines remained in the color applied by the manufacturer, usually black.

 

Exceptions

 

Photos of some Bf-109F/G/Ks exist which show the interior of the cowling in natural metal, while most are RLM 02. Photos of some Fw-190D-9s and Ta-152s show the interior of the cowling in natural metal, while most are RLM 02. Photos of some Me-262 and He-162 nacelles indicate that the interior was left in natural metal. These are all late war production aircraft and these variances are most likely a result of production dispersal and supply problems.

 

Fuselage

 

Prior to Fall, 1942 aircraft fuselage areas, with the exception of the cockpit were finished in RI.M 02. After Fall, 1942 they were left unpainted. The Alcad used for aircraft skinning material had an electroplated finish to prevent corrosion, which gave it a golden sheen similar to that on the interior of soup cans. Aluminum and other alloy areas were still given a coat of RLM 02 to prevent corrosion. However, galvanized steel was left unpainted. Equipment such as radios, fuel tanks, oxygen bottles, etc. were in the color applied by the manufacturer. Radios were usually black or gray; fuel tanks were usually black or gray. Oxygen bottles were usually overall blue or painted with blue striping.

 

Exceptions

 

Repaired areas were usually painted with whatever paint stocks were available, or left unpainted.

 

Wing

 

As with the fuselage, prior to Fall, 1942, wing areas were finished in RLM 02. After Fall, 1942, with the exception of the wheel wells and flap areas, they were left unpainted. . Gun bay areas generally retained their RLM 02 paint. They exhibited the golden color of the Alcad skinning material. Aluminum and other alloy areas were still given a coat of RLM 02 to prevent corrosion. However, galvanized steel was left unpainted. Equipment such as guns, fuel tanks, oxygen bottles, etc. were in the color applied by the manufacturer. Guns were usually black or gray; fuel tanks were usually black or gray. Oxygen bottles were usually overall blue, or painted with blue striping.

 

Exceptions

 

Repaired areas were usually painted with whatever paint stocks were available, or left unpainted. Gun bays on late war aircraft were sometimes seen in natural metal.

 

Flap Areas

 

For aircraft without separate flaps, the flap `well' and interior of the flap was painted with RLM 02. This is also true of the radiator flap and cowl flap areas.

 

Exceptions

 

Bf-109B/C/D/Es usually had the underwing radiator area painted the same color as the fuselage underside. Some late war Fw-190s exhibited natural metal flap areas.

 

Wheel wells

 

Now for the area you've been waiting for. Few regulations specific to the wheel well area exist, company and factories instructions usually deciding the matter. In keeping with standard practices as identified above, wheel wells and components should have been RLM 02. This includes tail wheel and nose wheel areas. Main gear and nose wheel struts were painted RLM 02, with the exception of the polished steel oleo area. Shock absorbers were a very dark gray, again with the exception of the polished steel telescopic sections. Cast and stamped wheel hubs were painted in semi-gloss black. Tail wheel hubs were usually unpainted (dark gray), or painted the underside color.

 

Exceptions

 

Some aircraft that used 100-octane fuel had the starboard gear strut (and sometimes the cover as well) painted red to distinguish them from other aircraft.

 

Photos of Bf-109B/C/D/E/Fs occasionally show wheel wells painted the same color as the underside.

Photos of Bf-109G/Ks indicate the wheel wells and struts were usually RLM 76 (fuselage underside color).

Photos of some Bf-109s show main gear struts painted RLM 66.

Photos of some Bf-109s show main gear struts painted underside color.

Photos of some Fw-190A-4 and later show wheel wells painted underside color.

Photos of some late war Fw-190s show natural metal wheel wells.

 

Me-262s had main gear bay/cockpit tub underside left in natural metal. However, nose wheel bay and strut were painted RLM 02. Some Me-262s had the main wheel well and/or nose wheel bay painted RLM 76.

 

Propellers

 

Although not an interior area propellers are also included in the Reichsluftministrium regulations. Steel prop blades were painted RLM 70 black green, while wood blades were painted RLM 71 dark green, with a semi-gloss clear coat protectant. Other late war wooden prop blades were painted in blue-gray, with the same semi-gloss clear coat protectant.

So there you have it, a fairly complete breakdown of World War 2 Luftwaffe color directives. While the information provided is by no means the definitive source on this subject, it should be a useful general guide. Remember, your best source of information is specific photos of your modeling subject!

 

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Glad to help, chaps. I'm simply propagating intel.

:book:

 

If Luft's your bag maybe you've not seen these:

 

RLM paint colour comparison charts, from Peter's Planes:

 

http://www.petersplanes.com/links.htm

 

Wolfram Bradac gives some more notes, and a small comment on scale effect:

 

http://www.rlm.at/cont/archiv01_e.htm

 

yiC

 

Rossco

 

 

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