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1:32 F-104 exhaust nozzle late (Eduard Brassin)


JeroenPeters
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1:32 F-104 exhaust nozzle late


Eduard


For Italeri kit


 


 


Catalogue # 632044


Available from Eduard for €14,95


Bunny Fighter Club price: €12,71


 


104nozzle-1.jpg


 


Eduard has jumped on the new Italeri 1/32 F-104 Starfighter and gone to town! A total of 28 sets have seen the light, including two Big Sin sets that include all you need to spice up your Starfighter. (Almost) All of these sets are or will be reviewed here on Large Scale Modeller so you can decide for yourself whether you need or just plain want it :)


 


J79-GE-19


Here we take a look at the late exhaust nozzle. First of all: calling the nozzle of a F-104 is a little bit confusing since it’s not a common description for a certain type of 104. So more accurately this nozzle was used on the 104 that had the J79-GE-19 engine. You can find this info on the back of the packaging, so look there to check whether a set fits your particular 104!


 


104nozzle-2.jpg


 


All in all about 23 variants of the J79 engine were born and (are) used in jets like the F-4 Phantom, B-58 Hustler, F-16 and IAI Kfir. 


 


With this nozzle you can either make the italian build Aeritalia F-104S or the retrofitted F-104A belonging to the 319th FIS.


The italian F-104S was perhaps one of the most capable of the 104-series, with the ’S’ standing for Swallow. The J79-GE-19 engine allowed for a faster climb than the F-104G and was capable of reaching Mach 2.


 


1640863.jpg


 


The Aeritalia F-104S


 


General_Electric_J79_-_detail_2.jpg


 


Looking inside the engine. Lots of detail you don't want to miss.


 


vic_006_l.jpg


 


Don't just spray one colour Alclad. Use different shades...


 


What do we get?


This set comes in the usual Edaurd Brassin blister pack with the added foam to protect the resin from damaging during transport. The Eduard Brassin sets usually contain both resin and PE, but this particular set consists of two resin parts that fit together. You will have to saw the moulding block on the rear of on both pieces in order to fit them together.


 


104nozzle-3.jpg


 


The instructions. Cut and fit. That's it.


 


104nozzle-10.jpg


 


104nozzle-7.jpg


 


104nozzle-5.jpg


 


104nozzle-4.jpg


 


104nozzle-8.jpg


 


104nozzle-9.jpg


 


The detail is like we have come to expect from Eduard: sharp, computer rendered (so no flaws or tool marks) and printed and accurate. You may be able to get an even higher level of detail by folding the entire nozzle from photo etch, but there are better ways to torture one-self. If you look at the photo’s of the real thing you’ll see the engine is made up from small overlapping plates, but I believe that with a nice dark wash the detail really pops up. What is not included in this set is the engine nozzle with closed vanes. Only the all open position. But since this is the way the nozzle is normally position on the ground, that’s OK. (For me that is).


 


 


Conclusion


A very simple way to add a lot of visible detail and accuracy to your blowtorch. An all resin solution with one nozzle in the all open position.


 


Very highly recommended


 


My sincere thanks to Eduard for this review sample. To purchase directly, click THIS link.


 


Jeroen Peters


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This nozzle was also used by the Germans for their F-104G's in a modification program from 1971 on:

 

J79-MTU-J1K

The J79-MTU-J1K version was developed by MTU Aero Engines under a modification programme to improve the reliability and economy of the engine. The modification programme lasted from 1971 to 1973.
The main modifications to the J79-11A engine were:

New turbine nozzle, stage 1
New material for turbine rotor

blades, stage 1
New afterburner assembly, with

modified exhaust nozzle
New afterburner fuel system 

 

So until 1971 you should use the "early" nozzle for German 104's and from 1973 you can be fairly certain that the "late" nozzle should be used! ;)

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