Jump to content
The Great LSM Twins Group Build ends July 3, 2024 ×

Sharper Model Photographs


Peterpools

Recommended Posts

So far I've been rather lazy and relied on F22 for the best depth of field of acceptable sharpness but the results are images that leave a bit to be desired of only acceptable  sharpness, front to back. I decided to do a bit of focus stacking in Photoshop, combing five images, each focused at a different point along the model, which will produce an image of nearly perfect sharpness. I should have actually done seven images also focusing on both wing tips but I was just testing. I also forgot to drop down to either F8 or F11, which is the aperture for this lens (Nikon S 24-70).   

Keep 'em comin

Peter

Five images focused stacked and very sharp. 

QY15ZS.jpg

This image is a single file and you can see how the sharpness softens up from nose to tail and wing tip to wing tip.

DUEmii.jpg

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very interesting Peter. I have to admit, I was to lazy to test image stacking for a better depth of field and use mostly my phone for pics, but using an app for better manual control of the parameters.
The other issue, why I use the phone more than my Panasonic Lumix GH3 with good prime lenses is, the color rendition. It is nearly impossible to get the processor of the camera to reproduce correct colors under artificial light conditions, without heavy tweaking.
I know, I could post process, but I learned to take pictures analogue on 35mm material and to me the moment of pressing the shutter is the moment of truth. I don't like the idea of post procession and do it only for artificial reasons.
Anyway, I'm always interested in new approaches to get better pictures, as I find photographing models seems to be extra challenging.

Cheers Rob

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Rob

I’ve been a Nikon shooter since the mid 1960’s and love photography. In the digital age, post work for me is part of the process of creating a fine print (I do all my own printing) and half the enjoyment. I do remember my own home darkroom in the film days and there are times I wish we could go back in time, as I still shoot film from time to time.

’Getting it right’ in camera is easy, as your GH3 is a mirrorless camera and through it’s menu settings you can correct all the colors - no post necessary.  Just shoot JEPGs and not RAW Files, as RAW files absolutely need post work. You can do the color correction right in camera: color temperature, sharpness and any other settings you need to in your cameras menu settings. What you see on your LCD screen or in the EVF is the image on the cameras sensor. After you take the image, what you see on the LCD screen is a camera processed JPEG file. 
What focus stacking does is allow you to infinitely Increase your depth of field razor sharp front to back, which is impossible to do with any camera except the old style view camera with it’s swings and tilts. The smaller apertures will only yield increased depth of field with reasonable sharpness due to diffraction. A cellphone works differently and nothing wrong with using it. With your app, you are still manually manipulating the file. 
 

Keep ‘em comin

Peter


 

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Peter,
thanks for your thoughts about photographing. I started the hobby seriously with a Minolta X-700, bought from my first earned money in '81. Along the Canon AE1-Programm it was the first camera to incorporate a program automatic and therefore electronics. By the time everybody predicted less durability due to the electronics. Forty years later, I have to laugh about that, the X-700 is still working and never failed me.
Later I changed to the Contax G-system with all available prime lenses minus the 16mm. For me as a travelling photographer, the perfect system, compact, durable and the wide angle lenses are on par with the Leica M prime lenses of equal focal length.
Going digital, I chose micro four third, because of the size and weight of the prime lenses. I nearly never use zooms. Being a good traveling camera the GH3 has it's shortcomings, when there is need for fast autofocus or macro photography under artificial light. Another system immanent drawback is the reduced depth of field, caused by the small sensor, you have only half the DOF compared to a full format sensor. Guess, why the 85mm f1,4 is my most loved lens for the Panasonic ;).
I know, that I can alter color settings in the camera among many other things. The problem is, there is no general correction possible, as the needed corrective is depending on the color of the subject and I don't want to correct for every new subject I picture. In normal light, there is only a slight prob with some greens, but under artificial light, there are varying effects.
Logic would call for shooting RAW and post process, but I am too lazy to do that, I may have to grow into it poco a poco :D.

Cheers Rob

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Rob

Thank you for filling me in and you are 100% correct. My most reliable camera was the Nikkormat - 100% manual and except for the button battery for the meter, no electronics. My favorite film cameras were a Nikon F4s and a Leica M6 but both were a long time to go. The F4s was a weapon if needed, actually had AF but weighed a ton. The M6 was a perfect camera, expensive and the glass was magnificent but a wee bit expensive. Sure wish I kept the Leica. I use to zone focus with it and it surely was unique in how the film was loaded.

I've stayed with Nikon all these years and only have two Nikon F mount lenses left, with all my other lenses now are Nikon S Line mirrorless and I now shoot with a Nikon Z7 - just love it.

I completely understand your reasoning for using your cellphone and the images you post, the clarity and crispness are right there. Keep doing what you are doing, the images posted are right up there.

BTW, A Contax G System - fantastic equipment and nothing like German optics.

Keep 'em comin

Peter

 

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Peter and Rob, thanks for sharing all the info and tips about photography. It's something I've had a passing interest in but never took the plunge. 

Back in high school I had a friend's Nikon F4 for shooting the school yearbook and you're right Peter, it was an absolute tank. I had no idea how to truly use it, mostly as a point and shoot but it took great photos. 

My neighbour who was into photography eventually bought it from him. 

I bought a Canon EOS M100 a couple years ago for family trips and what have you but I still don't use it that much.  I'll have to give it a try more.

Carl

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Carl

Just did a little reading up on your Canon and it is a very capable camera. Do you use it to take your build/model photographs? I would give it a try, as it should produce excellent results. I would recommend shooting JPEG files, so you won't have to do any post work. If I can help, let me know even though I'm a Nikon shooter

Keep 'em comin

Peter

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Peter, I haven't used it for taking any of my build or RFI pics. It's up in our living room and since I pretty much have my phone with me all the time, that's what I use. Maybe my next bench re-do I'll add a their for shooting pics. 

I need to get it out and try it more. Otherwise I'll never get used to it.

Carl

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Peter, thanks for the heads up on DSLR. A few years ago I did did buy myself a Canon 1300D entry DSLR. I have tried model shots but the lighting is never enough and can’t really justify buying lights. It looks like works drying up again so I may have another serious attempt at understanding all of it’s workings. I did buy an adapter so i could my old manual lenses…… 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Phil

Have no fears - just tell me what settings you were using and we'll correct the exposure problems.  If it's low light, we need to increase the ISO and decrease the shutter speed. Are you using a tripod or hand holding - makes a difference.

Keep 'em photographing

Peter

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...