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1:32nd scale Lloyd C.V


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Hi all,
The build of the Junkers J.1 is coming to a close.
So next up is the 1:32nd scale resin/3D printed Lloyd C.V from 'Lukgraph'.

On October the 4th, 1917, Feldpilot (Zugsfuhrer) Adolph Wiltsch and his Observer Roman Schmidt were flying Lloyd C.V Serial No: 46.01 from Flik 13 on the Russian Front.
They were attacked by three Russian ‘Sopwith’ type aircraft.
They managed to evade these attackers and Schmidt managed to shoot down one in flames.
This was Schmidt’s third aerial victory.

Mike

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Hi all,
Having completed the basic chapters for the Lloyd C.V build log, I've found a few bits that will need adding.

Addition lower wing support rods.
Increased depth of support rods in upper wings.
Cockpit cross bracing wires.
Pilot cockpit control rods and wires etc.
Pilot cockpit flight control cables.

Plus the following.

Mike

anemometer.jpg

bungee.jpg

flarerack.jpg

obspit.jpg

pit1.jpg

pilotstep.jpg

eng1.jpg

eng2.jpg

 

 

 

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Hi all,
The six kit supplied 3D printed exhaust pipes are not chamfered at the ends and not bored out internally.
Also, when fitted, the exhaust pipes should be angled slightly rearwards, which the kits pipes are not.
Therefore, I discarded the kit pipes and replaced them with rod and rubber tube.

The two supplied 3D printed halves of the cooling pipe are intended to be butt joined to the engine and to each other. This is a weak method of joining parts.
Therefore I cut out and replaced the larger diameter portion of the front pipe and replaced it with Brass 1.4 mm diameter tube.
The ends of the pipe were drilled and pinned into the engine, using 0.3 mm diameter Brass rod,

Mike

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Hi all,
My assumptions for how the engine cooling system worked are:

The engine driven water pump on the lower, rear of the engine, supplied water to the six engine cylinders.
This supply was pumped through a pipe interconnected to the lower right of the cylinders.
The water flowed up inside the cooling jacket of each cylinder and flowed out into the the return in the camshaft housing.
From there it flowed through the external forward pipe over the camshaft housing and into the base of the radiator.
It was then drawn around the inside of the radiator housing then down through the radiator to be drawn back to the water pump through the external rear pipe.

The external overhead cooling pipe supplied in the kit is in two parts and joined together.
The radiator just sits on the top of this pipe.
However, it seems this is not correct as can be seen from the following photographs taken at the time.
The supply to and the return from the radiator are separate pipes, which given the above would make sense.

Mike

rad3.jpg

rad1.jpg

rad2.jpg

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Hi all,
I decided to modify the radiator pipes to better represent those fitted to the actual aircraft.
The 3D printed rear pipe in the kit was discarded and a replacement made from 1.0 mm diameter rod with a 90 degree bend in the radiator end.
A hole was drilled into the water pump on the rear of the engine and also into the underside of the radiator.
The forward facing extension to the pipe was added with 1.0 mm diameter rod and 1.2 mm diameter tube.

The forward 3D printed pipe in the kit was modified with a 1.2 mm diameter end tube and 1.0 mm diameter 90 degree bent rod.
A 1.4 mm diameter tube was cut and fitted to the pipe stub on the top, front of the camshaft housing.
A hole was drilled for this pipe in the underside of the radiator.
Although dry fitted for now, it can all be added after the fuselage, with engine, has been closed up,

Mike

rad4.jpg

rad5.jpg

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Hi all,
The basic engine is nearly finished.
Just the ignition leads to add.
The control rods, pipes and exhaust pipes will be added later in the build.
As usual, painting a complete 3D printed engine is not that easy.
Personally I'd prefer to paint parts then assemble the engine, but that's the way 3D printing is taking us,

Mike

donk7.jpg

donk6.jpg

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On 8/19/2022 at 6:02 AM, sandbagger said:

I'd prefer to paint parts then assemble the engine,

I know what you mean Mike I like to do ships from time to time and most assemble then paint I pre-paint the engine looks good thus far.:notworthy:

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Hi all,
The fuselage components have been prepared for assembly.
The wood finish is 'Tamiya' Dark Yellow (XF60) over painted with Windsor & Newton’ Griffin (Alkyd) Burnt Umber oil paint.
The ammunition drum is a spare from a 'Gaspatch' Parabellum set, as its more in-scale than the kit supplied 3D printed part.
Now it's onto the control rods and cables before the fuselage is assembled and closed up with the engine,

Mike

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Hi all,
The internal fuselage detail is now complete.
I've added Control cables and cross bracing using 0.08 mm diameter mono-filament.
The spark advance control rod is 0.4 mm diameter Nickel-Silver tube, as will be the throttle control rod.
The throttle control rod will be added after the fuselage is closed up, so it can be passed through the left side of the instrument panel frame.

I may add a map to the gunners table,

Mike

fusintdone.jpg

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Hi all,
I'm intending to add a flare and a grenade ammunition rack.
So I thought I ought to add the flare and grenade pistols to the gunners cockpit.
Both 'spares' from previous 'Wingnut Wings' models.
The stowage containers were made from photo-etch and 1.4 mm diameter tube.
I also added a map,

Mike

pistols.jpg

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hi all,
I've not posted in the last few weeks, as we took a holiday abroad.
The first time in three years due to the Covid restrictions etc.
The four of us arrived home yesterday.
Yes, you guessed it!!
I have Covid, so does my wife and the wife of our friends we went with.
Anyway, once we're back to normal I'll crack on with the Lloyd model.

Mike

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Hi all,
After closing up the fuselage I found a problem with the rear fuselage cabane struts.
The two rear struts on each side were slightly bowed due to the angle they were fitted.
The bottom of two struts had also cracked (3D printed and not reinforced with rods).
Therefore, I cut the struts away and replaced them with shaped Brass tube and internal rod.
This also makes the struts stronger for bearing the weight of the upper wing halves,

Mike

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Hi all,
I've prepared the fitting of the upper and lower wings, including test fitting of the six interplane struts.
I found the best way to do this was to permanently fit the lower wings first.
The lower wings have only one integral locating rod and no location for the rod into the fuselage.
Having only one rod meant that the wings would pivot in the fuselage, making wing alignment a problem.
Also, the rod in the right lower wing is located farther rearwards than that in the left wing.
Therefore, the rod would be visible inside the cockpit.
I chose to cut away that rod flush to the wing root.
I then drilled an extra 1.0 mm hole in the left wing root and two holes in the right wing root.
Into these I secured 1.0 mm diameter Brass locating rods.
The fuselage was then marked and holes drilled through the sides of the fuselage.
Both wing locating rods are now not visible from inside the cockpit and the wings are positively located in the fuselage.
The upper wing halves needed to be drilled for 1.0 mm diameter joining rods that locate into the two slots in the top of the fuselage cabane strut assembly.
The locating holes for the six interplane struts were then drilled into, but not through their location points in the wings.
The integral strut rods were cut to 2.0 mm length as they were too long.
The struts were then temporarily held in their locating holes in the upper wing, which was then test fitted into the lower wings and cabane strut slots.

All in all not an easy wing installation, but rigid enough when test fitted.

lowwing1.jpg

upperwing.jpg

struts.jpg

I've also prepared the tail unit, as all of the parts have no locating rods.
I've added location rods of 0.5 mm and 0.8 mm diameter Brass rods.
I cut the elevators from the tailplanes in order to have them angled down slightly.

tail1.jpg

tail2.jpg

Now it's onto preparing the landing gear,

Mike

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Hi all,
The landing gear has been prepared now.
I've added the following:

1.4 mm diameter Brass tube into the drilled through wheels to provide a more positive fit onto the integral 1.2 mm diameter axle rods.
'EZ' heavy white stretch line to represent the 'Bungee' type suspension cords.
0.4 mm diameter Nickel-Silver tube, bent and fitted to represent the axle restraining cables. 
Flattened 0.6 mm diameter Brass tube with integral 0.4 mm diameter Brass rod to represent the crew footstep.

gear4.jpg

I've also made two crew steps from flattened 0.5 mm diameter Brass tube.
These were fitted to the fuselage left side at the observer's cockpit and to the fuselage right side below the engine.

steps.jpg

Now it's onto preparing the tail skid,

Mike

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Hi all,
The resin used for the 3D printed parts tends to be very brittle.
The tail skid bracing bars need to take the weight of the model.
Also, the tail skid has no integral strengthening rods or any location into the fuselage.
As I wasn't sure if the bracing bars were strong enough, I replaced the rear bracing bar with 0.8 mm diameter Brass rod.
This was bent at one end to fit into a drilled hole in the underside of the fuselage.

Now onto how to fit the upper wing ailerons onto the wing,

Mike

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Hi all,
The ailerons on the upper wing can't be attached with rods as the trailing edge of the upper wing is too thin to drill.
The kit supplies photo-etch 'hinges', which are flimsy and may not adhere well to an oil painted wood effect surface.
Therefore, I decided to modify the hinges by cutting away the hinge arms and drilling 0.5 mm diameter holes through the body of the hinges.
Brass tube of 0.4 mm diameter were inserted through the hinge bodies and holes drilled through the ailerons.
The tubes were bent forwards above and below the upper wing trailing edge.
Holes were drilled through the wing and the top tubes bent to fit into the holes.
The underside tubes were cut to end at the wing holes on the underside.
Doing this allows the ailerons to be angled on the upper wing and should provide a sturdier attachment.
The aileron control horns will be fitted into 0.4 mm wide slots, drilled though the ailerons inside the photo-etch mounting plates.

Now onto preparing for pre-rigging the model,

Mike

hinges.jpg

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi all,
It's been a while since I updated this build.
The fuselage, wings, gun cannister and landing gear axle fairing were airbrushed with 'Tamiya' Dark Yellow (XF60).
The flight control surfaces were primed white.
These were pre-shaded with 'Tamiya' Smoke (X19).
The flight control surfaces are covered with ‘Aviattic’ Clear Doped Linen (ATT32097) decal.
The wood effects were brush painted using a mix of Windsor & Newton’ Griffin (Alkyd) Vandyke Brown and Burnt Sienna.
Grey areas are ‘Tamiya’ Neutral Grey (XF53) or Dark Sea Grey (XF54).
Metallic surfaces are ‘Alclad’ Steel (ALC112) or 'Mr. Colour' Stainless Steel (213).
Decal areas were airbrushed with 'Alclad' Aqua Gloss 600.
All parts were then airbrushed with 'Alclad' Light Sheen (ALC311) in preparation for applying weathering effects,

Mike

decal1.jpg

CDL.jpg

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Hi all,
Just a few updates.
Propeller base coated with 'Tamiya' Dark Yellow (XF60) then brushed with Windsor & Newton (Alkyd) Burnt Sienna oil paint.
'Lohner' propeller logos applied from the 'LF Models' Austro-Hungarian set then sealed with 'Alclad' Light Sheen (ALC311).
Radiator assembly treated with 'Flory Models' Dark Dirt clay wash with the 'Number '7' decals (modified) from the 'Xtradecal' RAF set.
'Flory Models' Dark Dirt wash also applied to the wings, fuselage flight control surfaces and landing gear.

Now it's onto pre-rigging the model before assembly,

Mike

propdone.jpg

rad7.jpg

weathering.jpg

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Hi all,
The observer/gunners machine gun.
I chose to replace the kit supplied 3D printed machine gun parts.
I used the more refined resin ‘Schwarzlose’ 07-12 unjacketed weapon (17-32112) from ‘Gaspatch’.
The ammunition drum was a spare from a previous 'Wingnut Wings' build.
The kit supplied gun mount needed to be modified with a 0.4 mm diameter rod to fit the weapon to the mount firmly.
'Alclad' Gun Metal (ALC120) was airbrushed over the machine gun.
'Alclad' Steel (ALC112) was airbrushed over the ring mounting rails and lightly over the machine gun.
'Tamiya' Hull Red (XF9) was brush painted over the trigger handles.
'Tamiya' Weathering Master (Set B - Soot) was sponged around the muzzle of the barrel.
Ammunition belt was brush painted with 'Tamiya' Desert Yellow (XF59), 'Mr. Colour Brass (219) and Copper (215).

Mike

gundone.jpg

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