Jump to content
The Great LSM Twins Group Build ends July 3, 2024 ×

Hey Peter, how’s the aftermath up there!


Recommended Posts

Just read about y’all’s 4.8   Any models bouncing off shelves?  
 

We’ve had a rash of quakes in our area about 10-12 miles from my home   Our biggest was a 3.2   It’s the only one I felt   
 

Good luck with the rebuild, let me know if we need to donate to your damaged stash  

 

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

HI Scott

it's really getting a bit crazy - first rain and wind that never seems to stop and now a rare earthquake. We were luck, as Long Island is on the east side of the Hudson River a good 100 plus miles from the epicenter in New jersey. We felt the shaking a bit but no damage. New jersey had some damage, but all is OK, thank goodness.  BTW, the stash is fine. 

Luckly your quakes were in the 3,2 range as those are some what a lot milder. 

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yea, I’m not kidding when I say this, but I think it was ‘22 we had right at 80 small quakes in the 2.0 magnitude. Geologist said it’s from water leaking into the underground plates from the river that comes from our lake.  I kind of find it funny that they completely ignored the landfill that’s not far from it.  20 years ago it was level ground, today it’s a 200’ tall “hill” of compacted trash that’s probably teeter tottering the tectonic plates below it. 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Scott, makes perfect sense. The news reported we could experience aftershocks for the next week or so - pretty nerve-wracking.  When I was growing up, we were taught that NYC is built on solid bedrock and could never have an earthquake - how wrong they were as a major fault line runs right under the Hudson River. 

Of course, science predicts with global warming and the rising sea levels, everywhere in the world, all coastal areas will permanently be under water.

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Peterpools said:

Of course, science predicts with global warming and the rising sea levels, everywhere in the world, all coastal areas will permanently be under water.

I love these tall tales.  If it were true, do you think banks would still make loans or insurance companies would insure  beach front property?

My son moved down to the low country of SC in the Charleston area.  He was harping on oceans rising because of the streets flooding in downtown Charleston during high tides and full moons.  I laughed at him and told him that was happening when we moved there in 1970, and that’s when we were all going to die because the next ice age was coming faster than expected.  

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 minutes ago, ScottsGT said:

I love these tall tales.  If it were true, do you think banks would still make loans or insurance companies would insure  beach front property?

My son moved down to the low country of SC in the Charleston area.  He was harping on oceans rising because of the streets flooding in downtown Charleston during high tides and full moons.  I laughed at him and told him that was happening when we moved there in 1970, and that’s when we were all going to die because the next ice age was coming faster than expected.  

I love the ‘rising sea levels’ thing. Scott , you are so right. IF the seas rise the banks (financial ones )would RUN away. It is such B. S. about the seas ‘rising’. Ice expands, when it melts there is no way it can take up MORE space as water than it did as ice. Simple experiment is to fill a glass with ice, then top it off with water to the top of the glass and then sit back and watch the ice melt. The melted water will not go over the top of the glass. Never.  So with that info lets go and buy some fancy beach front at a cheap deal from folks who think they are gonna get washed into the ocean !🙄😆maybe a deal to be had. 
 

Jeff

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Scott & Jeff

Unfortunately, it's true and the sea levels are slowly rising as the ice caps are melting. The theory of all coastal land will be underwater will eventually happen, as it's going to take many hundreds of years if not longer. It doesn't have anything to do with the insurance companies as none will be around when it does happen.   

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, Peterpools said:

Scott & Jeff

Unfortunately, it's true and the sea levels are slowly rising as the ice caps are melting. The theory of all coastal land will be underwater will eventually happen, as it's going to take many hundreds of years if not longer. It doesn't have anything to do with the insurance companies as none will be around when it does happen.   

 

Boo! This man!  
I’m sure that returning ice age will kick in either just before this November or November 4 years down the road. 

  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, Peterpools said:

Scott & Jeff

Unfortunately, it's true and the sea levels are slowly rising as the ice caps are melting. The theory of all coastal land will be underwater will eventually happen, as it's going to take many hundreds of years if not longer. It doesn't have anything to do with the insurance companies as none will be around when it does happen.   

 

Peter hate to argue. But it has been proven to be scientifically impossible. The sea levels cannot rise. I saw an excellent doc on it not long ago and there were a bevy of scientists who absolutely debunked the theory. I know my glass of Jack on the rocks never spills over 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jeff

Not really for me to say, just paraphrasing what I've read and seen online. Hope it's not true but there are some areas already where rising sea levels are an issue. Just never know and of all the issues to worry about, this isn't even on my list.

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know a few common sense things:

1) If the ice is in the glass, it won’t increase the level of liquid in the glass when it melts down

2) On the other hand, if the ice is in a funnel above the glass, the level of liquid in the glass will rise when it melts down. By analogy, if ice is stored on a bed-rock like, for instance Greenland, Antartica, or a glacier, it will spill into  the oceans when it melts down, and this will increase the level of « the glass »

3) it’s a common physics rule that the volume of matter increases as it heats-up. It is the case for water. And it is a fact that the oceans have never been as warm as they are now. So, physically, the same quantity of ocean water will take more volume as it’s getting warmer. If, on top of it, you add water to the tub, the level will mathematically increase …

Edit: the volume of the same quantity of water rising from 20° C to 22° C will increase by a factor of 1.00048611. Infinitesimal, you will say. But applied to the average 3800 meters of Earths’ oceans depth, that is an increase of 1.84 meters … This February, the average temperature of the oceans was 21.6 °C. But of course, as their temperature rises, the oceans loose more water to evaporation, which compensates somewhat …

(And, btw, I have read that Manhattan has become so heavy with all human constructions that it is « sinking » as the bed-rock is pushed down by the added weight. Maybe it’s an urban legend, but I know that glaciers literally weigh on the bed-rock under them, so why not the same with concrete, bricks and mortar ?)

Hubert

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

55 minutes ago, Peterpools said:

Jeff

Not really for me to say, just paraphrasing what I've read and seen online. Hope it's not true but there are some areas already where rising sea levels are an issue. Just never know and of all the issues to worry about, this isn't even on my list.

 

I hear ya there Peter, lots to think about.. and seems to be more and more everyday...:rolleyes: a friend told me onetime, that his brain was like a shelf full of books.... when a new book was added, one fell off the other end.... seems these days, MY brain shelf is getting shorter and shorter, stuff falls off the end all the time !  LOL!!!:lol:

  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use to live in what use to be a small town about 30 miles outside of Charleston.  Of course it’s exploding in population due to all the industry moving in from Boeing to Mercedes and all the support industry.  But back in 1972 they came in and clear cut the forest behind the neighborhood and dug it up for the sand to fill a swamp in North Charleston to build a mall.  To drain the land they dug up a drainage ditch about 10’ wide and 8’ deep all the way down to the Ashley River. It was about 1/4 to 1/2 mile long.  Closer to the river my friends were finding those huge megalodon sharks teeth.  Like 6” tall.  
So in a nutshell we’re just heading back to where we came from I guess. 
I can’t wait to go fishing for Megalodons one day! 

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Who knows. being 76, I no longer even give things like that a second thought.

Living here in New York out on the Island, we hear stories about that all the time and yet the building of skyscrapers in Manhattan goes on and on. 

Scott

2 hours ago, HubertB said:

I know a few common sense things:

1) If the ice is in the glass, it won’t increase the level of liquid in the glass when it melts down

2) On the other hand, if the ice is in a funnel above the glass, the level of liquid in the glass will rise when it melts down. By analogy, if ice is stored on a bed-rock like, for instance Greenland, Antartica, or a glacier, it will spill into  the oceans when it melts down, and this will increase the level of « the glass »

3) it’s a common physics rule that the volume of matter increases as it heats-up. It is the case for water. And it is a fact that the oceans have never been as warm as they are now. So, physically, the same quantity of ocean water will take more volume as it’s getting warmer. If, on top of it, you add water to the tub, the level will mathematically increase …

Edit: the volume of the same quantity of water rising from 20° C to 22° C will increase by a factor of 1.00048611. Infinitesimal, you will say. But applied to the average 3800 meters of Earths’ oceans depth, that is an increase of 1.84 meters … This February, the average temperature of the oceans was 21.6 °C. But of course, as their temperature rises, the oceans loose more water to evaporation, which compensates somewhat …

(And, btw, I have read that Manhattan has become so heavy with all human constructions that it is « sinking » as the bed-rock is pushed down by the added weight. Maybe it’s an urban legend, but I know that glaciers literally weigh on the bed-rock under them, so why not the same with concrete, bricks and mortar ?)

Hubert

Hubert

Makes a lot of sense but and what eventually happens, happens. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, Peterpools said:

Who knows. being 76, I no longer even give things like that a second thought.

Scott


Old neighbor of mine was about 72-74 and had new roofing shingles installed. I asked him how many years was his warranty.  
“You think I give a shit!?”

:rofl:

  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, HubertB said:

I know a few common sense things:

1) If the ice is in the glass, it won’t increase the level of liquid in the glass when it melts down

2) On the other hand, if the ice is in a funnel above the glass, the level of liquid in the glass will rise when it melts down. By analogy, if ice is stored on a bed-rock like, for instance Greenland, Antartica, or a glacier, it will spill into  the oceans when it melts down, and this will increase the level of « the glass »

3) it’s a common physics rule that the volume of matter increases as it heats-up. It is the case for water. And it is a fact that the oceans have never been as warm as they are now. So, physically, the same quantity of ocean water will take more volume as it’s getting warmer. If, on top of it, you add water to the tub, the level will mathematically increase …

Edit: the volume of the same quantity of water rising from 20° C to 22° C will increase by a factor of 1.00048611. Infinitesimal, you will say. But applied to the average 3800 meters of Earths’ oceans depth, that is an increase of 1.84 meters … This February, the average temperature of the oceans was 21.6 °C. But of course, as their temperature rises, the oceans loose more water to evaporation, which compensates somewhat …

(And, btw, I have read that Manhattan has become so heavy with all human constructions that it is « sinking » as the bed-rock is pushed down by the added weight. Maybe it’s an urban legend, but I know that glaciers literally weigh on the bed-rock under them, so why not the same with concrete, bricks and mortar ?)

Hubert

Hubert is absolutely spot on. Why do you think all the Pacific island nations are so panicked about this? They raise it at every COP conference and resolutely get ignored by the vested oil interests of the USA, Saudi Arabia, etc.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Let me throw another food for thought idea out there.  
What’s to say we might be getting a slight level increase, but after a short while (geologically speaking) the oceans sea floor absorbs the water while filtering out the salt and replenishes the aquifers below the surface of the planet? 
Isn’t this kind of how we got salt mines in the first place?

just spitballing. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Peterpools said:

Scott

Anything is possible but one thing for sure, none of us will be around to see any of this.

 

I will be if I live long enough to complete my stash. 

  • Like 1
  • Haha 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...