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FS numbers for SBD Dauntless 3? +other ??


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Hi guys.

I am building the Trumpeter 1/32 Douglas SBD Dauntless 3. I am hesitant to follow Trumpeter's instructions.

Zinc chromate green appears to be the internal colour. I am likely incorrect. 

The blue grey # will be gratefully appreciated. 

Is the belly white? 

Ordinance colour of bombs?

Should I build an SBD 'early' or 'late' Mk for Torch?

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5 hours ago, DocRob said:

I'm leaning in, though I have no information to share, but the very same kit in stash, that might be one of my next builds. I'm all ears, gents.

Cheers Rob

Hi Doc.

So far this is the best Trumpeter kit I have worked on. Over 2 days work it has fit together beautifully. IMHO this kit is superb. 

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“US Navy aircraft in 1939 carried a color scheme dating back to May 1925, requiring aircraft to be painted Overall Aluminum, with upper wing surfaces painted Orange Yellow 614. Hulls and floats of seaplanes were painted Non-Specular (flat) Light Grey 602. This scheme was used until December 1940, when all ship-based aircraft were painted overall Light Grey 602. Patrol aircraft wore overall Non-Specular Light Grey 602 except for surfaces viewed from above, which were painted Blue-Grey (FS 35189) * .

Two months prior to the Pearl Harbor attack, orders came down requiring all USN and Marine Corps aircraft to be painted overall Non-Specular Light Grey 602 except for upper surfaces, which were painted Blue-Grey (FS 35189). On aircraft with folding wings, the portion of the wing viewed when folded was also painted Blue-Grey. This scheme was to remain until February 1943, after which time the tide of war had turned against Japan.

The Non-Specular, or Three-Tone, scheme appeared in February of 1943. Orders required all upper surfaces be Non-Specular Sea Blue 607, with Non-Specular Intermediate Blue 608 being applied to fuselage sides, vertical tail surfaces, and rudder. Under surfaces were Non-Specular Insignia White 601. On aircraft with folding wings, the portion of the wing viewed when folded was painted Non-Specular Intermediate Blue 608.

In late March 1944, colors from the 1943 Three Tone scheme were changed from Non-Specular to Glossy. The exception to this rule was fighter aircraft, which were to now carry Glossy Sea Blue 623 overall. Non-Specular Sea Blue 607 could be substituted in areas where it was necessary to protect the pilot from sun glare.“

This excerpt came from Scalecolors.com

Here are some inspiration pics. Note that sun fading on blue gray was rapid and extreme, these planes had a very mottled and chalky appearance, oil stained the blue darker and sun faded it almost a powder blue. Fading happened within a week or two, and if you look at aircraft #2 and #4, you can see the color fade. These are high quality original photos and are not colorized.

 

BB300E7A-C2FF-4952-9D61-F030EF819886.jpeg

6F5235F5-74A4-4AA1-84ED-D652A33FC480.jpeg

6BFD863E-6536-472C-9D88-5D1175C68285.jpeg

5736B987-9498-482A-987F-7C5C9E0B3A67.jpeg

0FC02B25-4E09-48CB-9CAF-729F9151E7AC.jpeg

400F997C-A57D-4730-AA15-45F2D04481E4.jpeg

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Mark, I don't recall ever seeing those pictures before, although I'm sure I have.  Truly incredible pictures those are!!  The weathering on those is wild and extreme, almost like it'd rub off on the crew's pant legs when they climb in and out.

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12 hours ago, 1to1scale said:

“US Navy aircraft in 1939 carried a color scheme dating back to May 1925, requiring aircraft to be painted Overall Aluminum, with upper wing surfaces painted Orange Yellow 614. Hulls and floats of seaplanes were painted Non-Specular (flat) Light Grey 602. This scheme was used until December 1940, when all ship-based aircraft were painted overall Light Grey 602. Patrol aircraft wore overall Non-Specular Light Grey 602 except for surfaces viewed from above, which were painted Blue-Grey (FS 35189) * .

Two months prior to the Pearl Harbor attack, orders came down requiring all USN and Marine Corps aircraft to be painted overall Non-Specular Light Grey 602 except for upper surfaces, which were painted Blue-Grey (FS 35189). On aircraft with folding wings, the portion of the wing viewed when folded was also painted Blue-Grey. This scheme was to remain until February 1943, after which time the tide of war had turned against Japan.

The Non-Specular, or Three-Tone, scheme appeared in February of 1943. Orders required all upper surfaces be Non-Specular Sea Blue 607, with Non-Specular Intermediate Blue 608 being applied to fuselage sides, vertical tail surfaces, and rudder. Under surfaces were Non-Specular Insignia White 601. On aircraft with folding wings, the portion of the wing viewed when folded was painted Non-Specular Intermediate Blue 608.

In late March 1944, colors from the 1943 Three Tone scheme were changed from Non-Specular to Glossy. The exception to this rule was fighter aircraft, which were to now carry Glossy Sea Blue 623 overall. Non-Specular Sea Blue 607 could be substituted in areas where it was necessary to protect the pilot from sun glare.“

This excerpt came from Scalecolors.com

Here are some inspiration pics. Note that sun fading on blue gray was rapid and extreme, these planes had a very mottled and chalky appearance, oil stained the blue darker and sun faded it almost a powder blue. Fading happened within a week or two, and if you look at aircraft #2 and #4, you can see the color fade. These are high quality original photos and are not colorized.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you so very much. Your input is invaluable. 

Many many thanks. :thumbsup2:

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Those air to air colour shots are remarkable, even showing how the formerly bright red paint on the perforated dive brakes was considerably weathered in the tough operating conditions endured by these aircraft. Many thanks for publishing these pictures at such high definition and good colour rendition.

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7 hours ago, JohnB said:

By the time of Torch the SBD's had twin .30's in the rear pit as far as I know.

I recommend that you get a copy of the D&S book on the SBD. Lots of useful info there.

Thanks John. :thumbsup2:

7 hours ago, John Stedman said:

Those air to air colour shots are remarkable, even showing how the formerly bright red paint on the perforated dive brakes was considerably weathered in the tough operating conditions endured by these aircraft. Many thanks for publishing these pictures at such high definition and good colour rendition.

Indeed. :thumbsup2:

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