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Using Rotex/Dymo Embossing Label Tape as scribing guide


rkranias
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It's good stuff but I've had trouble finding it. It seems they like to produce the thinner type of tape, probably because it's cheaper, but I cleaned out a local Officeworks of their last stock so I'm set for a while if the stuff ever gets discontinued.

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Hi Rick,

 

I have used it for years, although I think it is getting harder to find. I think peel-and-stick printable labels have been the death-knell of the Dymo labelers. I have a few rolls of it left, which is likely a lifetime supply for me. I only use it as a guide when restoring short lengths of panel lines lost in sanding.

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I have used it too. Bought a bunch of rolls on eBay a couple of years ago.

 

As has been said, cutting it into thinner strips a) makes it easier to conform to various surfaces and b ) makes it last three times longer or more...

 

I'm sure there must be a better product out there by now...

 

For scribing vertical panel lines on curved fuselages Doug Feeney (of ID Models fame) gave me a good tip. He uses cable ties. Line it up tighten it, scribe line and then with care you can open it up again for the next panel...

 

Matt

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I have used it too. Bought a bunch of rolls on eBay a couple of years ago.

 

As has been said, cutting it into thinner strips a) makes it easier to conform to various surfaces and b ) makes it last three times longer or more...

 

I'm sure there must be a better product out there by now...

 

For scribing vertical panel lines on curved fuselages Doug Feeney (of ID Models fame) gave me a good tip. He uses cable ties. Line it up tighten it, scribe line and then with care you can open it up again for the next panel...

 

Matt

cable ties!  how clever!

 

this is why I love this forum!

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  • 6 years later...

Hey, guys. Frankly speaking, I have tried a lot of different labels, I mean the firms and models, but brother dk2205 labels are the best. They are thinner than the original factory labels so they stick well and don't try to curl back off what you stick them to. These are the only labels I ever use in my store on my products.I use approximately 600 labels a month and could not be happier!

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I have found that the Dymo tape is too thick/heavy to use over tight curves. I have started to use Madworks Carving Guide Tape. It is available in 3&6 mm width. I ordered mine off E-Bay. It is much thinner and can be used on tight curves. Yet it is thick enough to be a good guide. 

 

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I used Dymo tape lately as a sawing guideline for my Arado 234 surgeries. It worked ok, but I got some black residues left on the fuselage plastic and decided to apply a layer of Kabuki for protection on the clear parts under the Dymo. That way I had no problems with black sticky leftovers on the canopy.

Cheers Rob 

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