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Eduard Bf-108


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5 hours ago, Clunkmeister said:

Couldn’t resist.  Oh fart! Now I need to find a nice 1950s civil scheme.

Me 2 ! My order was on the assumption I would find some nice civvie scheme. And even without Martinn (- lazy -hint, hint ;) ) I did find some on the net, even if my choice is not final yet.

I also went for some AM (and doubled the price in doing so). The wheels seem a "must buy". From the inside-of-the-box pics on the Eduard site, it seems the resin propeller and some cockpit PE sold separately are not needed, because they are already in the original boxing, so beware.

Hubert

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Are the wheels similar to a 109 style, or more of a low pressure civilian style?

Im glad the prop is ok because i placed an order a few weeks ago with Henri Daehne and it’s too soon to bother him again.. LOL. 

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Kermit Weeks is restoring a civilian one that was sold to a gentleman in Brazil prior to the war, he has a number of videos documenting the work on his channel on you tube which shouldn't be hard to find. Most of those still flying today were built in France after the war.

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I got mine last week, looks really nice and great value for money looking at what's in the box. I've been building mostly jets recently but this has got my interest up for a WW2 build.

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12 hours ago, biggtim said:

I know I'm the minority, but this thing does not appeal to me at all. Am I missing something?

I don't think so, same here, no interest in it at all. Thankfully tastes are different.

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15 hours ago, biggtim said:

I know I'm the minority, but this thing does not appeal to me at all. Am I missing something?

No, not really.  I expect it’s an acquired taste. I don’t find it particularly attractive, but it’s certainly historical, and if you ever see one, they’re certainly unique. It’s a mid 30s light 4-5 seat general aviation craft that was decades ahead of its time when released to the public.  It’s claim to fame being that it was a very competent cruiser at the time new aircraft looked like WACos and Beech model 17s. Oh, and it also fathered the 109.

It was such a good design that it was produced for years in France after the war, with various engine installations.  I believe there have also been several halfhearted attempts to restart production using modern American engine and propeller combinations, but that has gone nowhere.  Today, it’s just an led airplane design that has been eclipsed by many others over the years. 

Half the issues for me are that people painting them up to look like 109s, and in that form, they’re downright ugly.  But as built, they ain’t bad.

8C1161BF-F285-466F-AA2C-0702658A9FF1.jpeg

C56B67F7-01AF-45E4-BFDC-5FE90CB63FB2.jpeg

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I always thought they looked OK with the original V-8, but they look spectacular with a nicely cowled Lycoming or Continental flat 6. plus, it gives the underpowered 108 a real horsepower boost as well.

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Got mine today, ordered direct from Eduard.

I had added to my order resin wheels (with plain hub - there is another set with spoked wheels) and they are worth the investment IMHO. Also masks for the canopy (ref. JX253), certainly needed given the glasshouse, and finally a set of PE external add-ons (ref. 32452) where at least the PE wheel-well covers are a redundant item to the resin ones included with the wheels' set. Only a building will tell if this set was needed at all.

I confirm that the standard boxing includes a PE-fret with a pre-printed IP (not bad, but maybe slightly inferior to the "Löök" one, which I passed) and small dteails like belts, handles, trim wheels, etc., a 3D-printed resin propeller to represent the original's wooden one (the metal prop is on the IM plastic sprues), and finally a small masks' sheet for the letters of the proposed markings, all military Luftwaffe ones, with Nazi Swastikas, unfortunately for me.

I'll try to do a box-opening review asap.

Hubert

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Please do a review, Hubert. I have absolutely NO time. And it’s pretty much a French aircraft, so you have more knowledge than I.

The only thing I ask is, “What were they thinking, moulding the slats CLOSED?  Handley-Page flaps are always open at rest. 

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WHAT?  Closed slats?  WTF!!  Anyway...  my spending habits are getting a big change...  I had to apply for a car loan today.  I wrecked my ute on Tuesday.:wacko:

 

I won't be rushing to buy one, now.

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3 hours ago, Clunkmeister said:

Please do a review, Hubert. I have absolutely NO time. And it’s pretty much a French aircraft, so you have more knowledge than I.

The only thing I ask is, “What were they thinking, moulding the slats CLOSED?  Handley-Page flaps are always open at rest. 

Me ? A specialist in anything Messerschmitt ? :rofl:

Here is ALL my knowledge about the 108 : it has a prominent role in preparing the ground for an iconic fighter, the 109, for which the filiation is apparent in many areas. It was produced in France during and after the war. Being a transport and liaison aircraft, it had some cool civilian schemes. And I quite like the shark look the air-cooled engine gave it ... Voilà, voilà :D

Hubert

PS : and now I know slats should be deployed when the aircraft is at rest on the ground - although, in fairness, it looks like they are sometimes locked shut on some modern civilian Taifuns ... 

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About slats. Years ago I had a chance to land my mitts on Buchon and first thing I did was to press the slats in, and viola they stayed closed, in matter of fact I had to use force to pull them back out, not much , just to fight the weight. So there you go, 109, and most likely 108 slates are naturally falling in.

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Well, it’s not really about what is natural or historically correct.  It’s about making extra work for the guys who want to add something else for visual interest.   At this scale and price I would be unhappy with an up scaled 1/48 model.

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