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A Technique I call: Component Variation


GazzaS

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Just beware that this idea may exist somewhere else, and may have been written much better than I can.  I only claim originality insomuch as I haven;t seen it somewhere else before that I can remember.

 

I know many people argue about paints, shades, historically correct, and a thousand other notions.  But this is mine, and I started it a couple models ago.

 

The basic idea is that the sub-contractor that made the radios, and the sub-contractor that made the floor, and the sub-contractor that made the fuse panel, and the sub-contractor that made the IP didn't all get to use the same pot of paint.  They all didn't necessarily get their paints from the same paint supplier.  In other areas, this expands to storage panniers, canopy framing, and anything else that arrived at the aircraft factory ready to be installed.

 

This example is in the Sturer Emil by Trumpeter:

jSzFmR.jpg

Instead of having the shell racks, the powder canister containers, the gun breach, and the inner walls of the fighting compartment looking like they were all painted by one guy at one time, I've tinted base colors to reflect that they were all painted prior to assembly and probably came from different sub-contractors.

 

I did it on this small scale Me-262 pit as well.  The IP and the stick are tinted differently from the rest of the tub.

44Kfjp.jpg

And on this Dornier Do 217.  I reckon that one company made the seats...  so I used the same color/tint for them.

t4sLtl.jpg

Now I can't claim to be particularly gifted when it comes to wielding the paint brush.  So streaks appear, or sometimes my wash will be less than neat/perfect....

But I think that this 1/32 Hasegawa  bf 109F's cockpit is one of the best I've ever done. 

bzbNEb.jpg

 

The unpainted parts were inspired by a Kagero book on the 109F.

9788365437440-us.jpg

 

I'd be interested in hearing what you guys think of it?

 

Gaz

 

 

 

 

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I've always thought that this was a good idea as it prevents the interior from looking too uniform and it's one reason I don't get too upset with Eduard's goofy colors on IP's and interior parts. That said I'm usually too lazy to spend the time and effort to multi shade parts.

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10 hours ago, GazzaS said:

Just beware that this idea may exist somewhere else, and may have been written much better than I can.  I only claim originality insomuch as I haven;t seen it somewhere else before that I can remember.

I know many people argue about paints, shades, historically correct, and a thousand other notions.  But this is mine, and I started it a couple models ago.

The basic idea is that the sub-contractor that made the radios, and the sub-contractor that made the floor, and the sub-contractor that made the fuse panel, and the sub-contractor that made the IP didn't all get to use the same pot of paint.  They all didn't necessarily get their paints from the same paint supplier.  In other areas, this expands to storage panniers, canopy framing, and anything else that arrived at the aircraft factory ready to be installed.

This example is in the Sturer Emil by Trumpeter:

Instead of having the shell racks, the powder canister containers, the gun breach, and the inner walls of the fighting compartment looking like they were all painted by one guy at one time, I've tinted base colors to reflect that they were all painted prior to assembly and probably came from different sub-contractors.

I did it on this small scale Me-262 pit as well.  The IP and the stick are tinted differently from the rest of the tub.

And on this Dornier Do 217.  I reckon that one company made the seats...  so I used the same color/tint for them.

Now I can't claim to be particularly gifted when it comes to wielding the paint brush.  So streaks appear, or sometimes my wash will be less than neat/perfect....

But I think that this 1/32 Hasegawa  bf 109F's cockpit is one of the best I've ever done. 

The unpainted parts were inspired by a Kagero book on the 109F.

I'd be interested in hearing what you guys think of it?

Gaz

Totally agree, and nice models you've shown, too!

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YESSSS!!!!

Gazz, you hit the nail squarely on the head.  This is something so often missed on models, especially when we tend to get lazy.  Case in point: my B-36.  There's a gazillion electronic boxes in that bugger, and each and every one has it's own subtle differences, not to mention variations due to component replacement due to unserviceability, ETC.

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Those Curtiss factory shots are amazing. Yes, we've seen tghem a thousand times or more, but it never ceases to amaze me at these people running the engines of aircraft being assembled, right in the middle of a crowded ramp, with people and equipment bustling all over the place.  An accident waiting to happen.  Anyone who's either witnessed, or seen the aftermath of a prop strike won't soon forget the visuals.

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It's an interesting and logical idea that I sometimes use sparingly Gaz.

Currently subtly varying the O/D colours on the ZM Tony cockpit. The base is Tamiya TS-28 from the spray can, the weathered plate above Tamiya XF-58 Olive Green, giving the lower section a slightly greener tinge.

IMG_20200526_201932.thumb.jpg.5e4073b8b1526ff233b6356908ee3427.jpg

This kind of technique is always a good idea on late-war Luftwaffe cockpits. Instrument panels were often made of wood, and the RLM66 used for them  lacked the Zinc Yellow that was added to other paints required for corrosion protection; and stayed Grey whereas the other areas turned to a greenish tinge over time.

S

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I remember reading a 2 Group history, apparently all the damaged Lanc’s were carted off to a place in Lincoln and from however many a few were then sent back to the airfields. Dare bet they didn’t bother repainting everything the MOD colour.....Gaz  like your approach .......great idea........

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Looking over this threadand the work displayed has reminded me of a lot of the custom work I have done.

Specifically the 'centering out' of components and the maximizing of colouring AND detailing.

When I built this model of a post war bobber I emplyed the same diligence that was applied to building custom choppers in real time.

cright3.jpg

cright1.jpg

cright.jpg

Same thing as this thread is alluding to , just going beyond the coloring...

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Thanks for the great responses and the great photos, guys!  I love those factory shots!  Imagine how modelling would be if they had developed (no pun intended) decent color film before the outbreak of WWI.

 

That blue on the p-40's is totally interesting!  Anybody know anything about it?

 

Gaz

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2 hours ago, GazzaS said:

Thanks for the great responses and the great photos, guys!  I love those factory shots!  Imagine how modelling would be if they had developed (no pun intended) decent color film before the outbreak of WWI.

 

That blue on the p-40's is totally interesting!  Anybody know anything about it?

 

Gaz

It’s just blue layout dye, used in machining and marking metal. Strange it’s on sheet aluminum, because it could cause cracking if you scribed a line. Maybe they just poked a dot from a template?

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1 hour ago, 1to1scale said:

It’s just blue layout dye, used in machining and marking metal. Strange it’s on sheet aluminum, because it could cause cracking if you scribed a line. Maybe they just poked a dot from a template?

My guess also. I've used it alot.....harv

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