Jump to content

Do Germans still write like this?


GazzaS
 Share

Recommended Posts

Silly question I know.   Is this script still in usage?  I can't read this well enough to type it into Google Translate.  I look at any old German document and all of the handwriting is completely lost to me.

109748091_10220475687474327_596783123530

 

So....   do they?

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

No, that is no more in use. Old people are able to read, but I had only some hours in school to study that type of German handwriting. I think it's called Kurrentschrift and differs from the printed letters in old German books.

I could decipher it only partly. Couldn't read the town.

Hauptmann Oeswin? mit seinem
Flugzeugführern beim Frühstück.
Unser (last world, I also can't decipher)

Hauptmann ? with his
pilots while breakfast.
Our ?

That's worse than 1/48 rigging :D, maybe others are more educated than me and can help.

Cheers Rob

  • Like 3
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tried some more on the last word, could be a name of a person.
The first version is with the letters I'm more or less sure they are right. The x's are where I'm nearly completely lost.

Nasxxlxagitüm
Nashelhagitüm

Nasfeltagitüm


None of this makes any sense in German, so maybe it's a name of a person, but it's hard to say, because there are different types of this kind of handwriting.

 

The name of the town seems to start with H and seems to end with the not unusual ending of 'kirch' like church. 

 

Hope that helps a little.

 

Cheers Rob

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Administrators

Even cursive in English is going the way of the Dodo bird.  No joke, when I write in cursive, not one single person under 30 has a clue what I wrote.  It's a GREAT code.

Same as writing on English, but, as best as you are able, using the Cyrillic alphabet.  :rofl:

  • Like 2
  • Haha 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sue asked my dad for a recipe for these steamed buns so my dad wrote it out for her. After she got it, she wasn't sure that she'd be able to eat them as she thought they had suet. I was a bit shocked so I took a look at the note. It said salt. Now my dad has terrible writing so I grew up trying to decipher things he'd written. But that was worth a laugh. 

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, GazzaS said:

It's on the back of a German wartime photograph, Hubert.

Sure. Even I could decipher « Flugzeug ». I was just making fun of the world’s most renown terrible handwriting profession: MDs. Mind you, pharmacists manage to decipher them. I wonder if they get special courses for that :rolleyes: ?
 

Hubert, who seldom uses handwriting now, and whose wife complains about « undecipherable gibberish » :D

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 hours ago, Clunkmeister said:

Even cursive in English is going the way of the Dodo bird.  No joke, when I write in cursive, not one single person under 30 has a clue what I wrote.  It's a GREAT code.

Same as writing on English, but, as best as you are able, using the Cyrillic alphabet.  :rofl:

Im with you mate ... my primary teachers would tear me a new one if my "upsweeps" or "curl's" were a fraction off ...

and then I had to fill out forms for a couple of years in block capitals only!! ... Never looked back since - can still read cursive well ...

Unless its written by a doctor - then I'm in strife!!

Rog :)

  • Like 2
  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

40 minutes ago, Artful69 said:

can still read cursive well ...

This is no normal German cursive up there. It's a way of handwriting used in Germany and other countries in history. In Germany it was officially used until the early 40's.
The letters used correspond to the actual used German handwriting only marginal. Some of the words are easy recognizable, like Hubert mentioned 'Flugzeug', but others are hard to read, because lots of letters feature similar shapes and are hard to distinguish.
The old handwriting is more gothic-, the new more Latinum styled, it's a whole different approach.

Cheers Rob

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, DocRob said:

This is no normal German cursive up there. It's a way of handwriting used in Germany and other countries in history. In Germany it was officially used until the early 40's.
The letters used correspond to the actual used German handwriting only marginal. Some of the words are easy recognizable, like Hubert mentioned 'Flugzeug', but others are hard to read, because lots of letters feature similar shapes and are hard to distinguish.
The old handwriting is more gothic-, the new more Latinum styled, it's a whole different approach.

Cheers Rob

I am sure you're correct ... I certainly have no idea!! ... 

But as my response was to Ernie's post and not the OP - I was referring to english handwriting!!

:lol::lol::lol:

Rog :)

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...