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HPH Models 1:32 scale - Austro-Hungarian Aviatik 'Berg' D.I

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Hi all,
Here are the final reveal shots of the WW1 Austro-Hungarian Aviatik 'Berg' D.I fighter, operating with Flik 63J during 1918.

1:32 scale resin model from the Czech company 'HPH Models.
Gaspatch turnbuckles, micro-tube and mono-filament used for the rigging.
Laminated wood propeller from 'ProperPlane'.
Figure from 
Grass mat for display base from 'Polak'.
Paint used were 'Tamiya' acryics.
Figure - ‘Copper State Models’ Austro-Hungarian flying ace (F32-032).

My usual full and detailed PDF build log is available to download from gallery 2 on my site (link below).


Mike

Berg1.jpg

Berg2.jpg

Berg3.jpg

Berg4.jpg

Berg5.jpg

Berg6.jpg

Berg7.jpg

Berg8.jpg

Berg9.jpg

Berg10.jpg

Berg11.jpg

Berg12.jpg

Berg13.jpg

Berg14.jpg

Berg15.jpg

 

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Beautiful! I love the finish on the doped-fabric, just magic! Only an observation, and it may be the angle I'm looking at it, or some peculiarity of this aircraft, but the ailerons appear to be deflected as if rolling to the left, but the stick appears central(ish) whereas I'm guessing it should be laying to the left of vertical, (and perhaps forward a touch?) looking at the ailerons and elevator?

Parked, light fighters like this usually would  have the stick tied back with the lap-straps, to give full up-elevator, in effect helping prevent the tail from lifting in high-winds (the tail-plane and elevator exerting, therefore, a down-force whilst the wing remains "stalled"). This in turn helped prevent the wind getting under a wing and un-stalling it, and has the other benefit of preventing the control-surfaces being slapped back and forth by the wind which can do serious damage. Also common, would have been to tie-down the wings with loose-ropes to large stones or sand-bags (I'd expect the latter may well have been placed over the wheel axle?). Loose ropes being used as the dew over-night can cause them to shrink, potentially exerting damaging forces on the airframe if they become taut..

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You are a machine, Mike ! Not only is your work outstanding, but the speed at which you achieve it is simply mind-boggling !

And this one is another proof of your talent. (Extremely) Well done :unworthy: !

Hubert

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All the beautiful detail work aside, the most stunning aspect on your Berg is the perfectly blended overall look.

Cheers Rob

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Mike,  absolutely stunning congratulations. I agree with Rob that the whole vignette works seamlessly......what’s the secret to pop the rib definition out of the CDL. I’m just starting my first WnW and have decided to the CDL scheme.

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